Wednesday, November 20, 2013

DOJ Drops Request to Block Louisiana Vouchers: Is Jindal Disappointed?

Yesterday, DOJ withdrew its requests for an injunction of Louisiana's voucher program. Most conservatives and choice proponents immediately rejoiced and appeared ready to move on. Bobby Jindal, however, displayed either minor disappointment or an inability to accept victory graciously.  My read is that he is disappointed this issue is going away and is going to try to keep it alive as best he can.  The problem is that he only remaining objection is paperwork.  

While DOJ is no longer seeking an injunction, it does want to continue to monitor the program to ensure it does not have segregative effects.  To do so, it wants to receive data each year on the program.  Data tracking, demographic shifts, and regular status conferences to review them are standard fare in desegregating districts and there really is no basis to object.  One never knows to which side's advantage the facts will play, but monitoring progress and regression is absolutely necessary for courts to carry out their responsibility.

Jindal's response: "This is a typical Washington move. The updated Department of Justice request reeks of federal government intrusion that would put a tremendous burden on the state, along with parents and teachers who want to participate in school choice.”  Louisiana's state superintendent also fell in line behind his governor, calling the request for data a “power grab. . . .They want to retain control over something that we believe should be in the hands of parents. . . .It is clear that they want that power.”

Given our data driven and reporting world, turning of this small data set over is unlikely to pose much, if any, additional burden on Louisiana.  This sounds more like an attempt to continue the political rhetoric and disregard basic desegregation law.  The troubling aspect of this case is why DOJ is taking this position now.  My perspective throughout was that we had to respect the legal process in a case where existing desegregation orders were already in place and that we could not presuppose the facts.  What is unclear is whether DOJ had been blocked from getting the facts initially and, thus, filed suit (but now that it has the facts believes there is no problem) or DOJ folded under political pressure.  DOJ is not one to fold and mid-way into this battle had indicated that all it wanted was data. In that respect, its actions have been consistent.  But if it only wanted data, why did ask for the program to be enjoined?  One explanation would be litigation strategy.  If in fact Louisiana was being obstinate in regard to the minor request for data, the request for injunction upped the ante and protected against the possibility that Louisiana was hiding something.  Regardless, to Jindal's likely disappointment, this case is finally poised to fade away into the normal litigation progress, which only a select few will follow.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2013/11/doj-drops-request-to-block-louisiana-vouchers-is-jindal-disappointed.html

Charters and Vouchers, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink

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