Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Ravitch Says Concentrated Poverty is the Source of Our Schools Ills

Ravitch_au-photo_sq-b0dc85d6853d8edf48393b5c8a5f4a218029b85c-s6-c85Last week, I posted on the release of Diane Ravitch's new book, Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools.  I am eagerly awaiting its arrival and will post a review once I read it. In the meantime, she offered us a fuller taste Friday in an interview with NPR. The interview indicates a no-holds-barred attack on charters, vouchers, and other reforms of the past decade, which she, of course, signed onto during the Bush administration, but now thinks better of.  Speaking of school choice and charters, she threw several hard blows: 

When people pay taxes for schools, they don't think they're paying off investors. They think they're paying for smaller class sizes and better teachers. . . . [Charters] have become part of the movement to turn education into a consumer product rather than a social and a public responsibility....What I mean is that you go shopping for a school. I don't believe in school choice. I believe that every neighborhood should have a good public school. And if the parents don't want the good local public school and they want to send their child to a private school, they should do so — but they should pay for it.

After this stinging critique, she emphasized that our schools are not in some new crisis.  Rather, they are performing better than ever before.  With that said, we do have significant pockets of dropouts and low performance.  But these results are not a product of our schools somehow having sunk to new lows in terms of the education they offer.  She cites the problem as the continuing presence of concentrated poverty.  "Where there are low test scores, where there are higher dropout rates than the national average, is where there is concentrated poverty."

Much to my chagrin, she does not, however, seem to propose policies to deconcentrate poverty. Maybe she considers them unrealistic.  Instead, she prescribes smaller classes, pre-k, and arts programs.  I would agree that those are important programs that can provide significant help, particularly pre-k.  I just hope she is not giving up on remedying the root cause of the problem.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2013/10/ravitch-says-concentrated-poverty-is-the-source-of-our-schools-ills.html

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