Friday, October 25, 2013

African Americans Separated from Whites and Demeaned in Class, Not Necessarily an Isolated Story

Students from a Dallas Fort Worth School allege that a music teacher separated the African American students from the white students and then demeaned the African American students, including calling them "stupid."  Charges of racism are now being leveled at the teacher.  The district is investigating.  In my attempt to track down the facts-- which are pretty fuzzy--on thisstory, I ran across a few other similar stories.  I would have thought that blatant classroom discrimination segregation would be an isolated story, but two stories suggest it may not be.

The first story relates to another teacher in Minnesota calling African American students "fat" and "stupid" in class.  The families subsequently filed a discrimination lawsuit.  If these were only isolated statements, they would be unlikely to lead to liability under Title VI, but the claim is that the teacher had repeatedly used such language and the school had refused to address it, which makes their claim stronger.

The second story was not malevolent, but even more remarkable.  In 2011, school officials in Lancaster, PA admitted to segregating African American students from the rest of a school's students and then dividing the African American students further by gender. The separation is purportedly brief, lasting just six minutes each day and 20 minutes twice a month.  When brought to light, the officials defended the plan, indicating it was motivated by their desire to address the specific challenges that African American students face and to close the achievement gap.  The school, however, seems to be overlooking its own biases as one of the likely causes of the underachievement of African American students.  That these biases are in play is reinforced by their stereotypical notion that African Americans are the only students in the district with risk factors that need to be singled out and that all African Americans are seriously at risk.  Were these assumptions not below the surface, the total and rigid segregation of African American students would have been illogical to the district.  In short, the district appears to have been well intentioned, but good intentions do not keep bias or discrimination at bay.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2013/10/african-americans-separated-from-whites-and-demeaned-in-class-not-necessarily-and-isolated-story.html

Discrimination, State law developments | Permalink

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