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Univ. of San Diego School of Law

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Sunday, August 10, 2008

Bridget M. McCormack Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs Michigan Law School

Bridgetm Bridget M. McCormack, who is the associate dean for clinical affairs, is also a clinical professor with the Michigan Clinical Law Program teaching a criminal defense clinic, a domestic violence clinic, and a pediatric advocacy clinic. Before joining the faculty, McCormack was a Robert M. Cover Fellow at Yale Law School. As a Cover Fellow, she taught and supervised students in the Community Legal Services Clinic and the Prison Litigation Clinic. McCormack earned her law degree from New York University School of Law where she was a Root-Tilden scholar, and her B.A., with honors in political science and philosophy, from Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut. She has worked as a staff attorney with the Office of the Appellate Defender and she was a senior trial attorney with the Criminal Defense Division of the Legal Aid Society, both in New York City. McCormack has been published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review and wrote, with Andrea Lyon, the Criminal Defense Motions Book for the State Appellate Defender’s Office. McCormack’s current clinical practice, as well as her research and scholarship, focuses on criminal charging issues, specifically the issues surrounding women charged with crimes against their partners and issues surrounding terrorism prosecutions. [Mark Godsey]

Featured Articles

Law School develops collaborative pediatric advocacy clinic
The University Record

August 10, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 2, 2008

Shaun P. Martin: University of San Diego Law School Professor of Criminal Law

Martinsp2 Professor of Law


A.B. 1988, Dartmouth College; J.D. 1991, Harvard University

Professor Shaun P. Martin served as an editor of the Harvard Law Review and a general editor of Harvard University’s Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review. He clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and practiced law with Quinn, Emanuel, Urquhart & Oliver in Los Angeles before coming to USD in 1995. Martin teaches civil procedure and professional ethics. He writes in the areas of civil procedure, criminal law and professional responsibility. Among his publications are "Intracorporate Conspiracies," Stanford Law Review, "Encumbered Shares," Illinois Law Review, and "Substitution," Tennessee Law Review. He received the Thorsnes Prize for Excellence in Teaching in both 2006 and 1999 and was the Herzog Endowed Scholar in 2007.  [Mark Godsey]

August 2, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 26, 2008

Carol A. Chase: Pepperdine Professor of Criminal Law

Chase

Professor of Law
B.A., summa cum laude, University of California, Los Angeles, 1975
J.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1978

View a list of Professor Chase's recent writings

Before joining the Pepperdine faculty, Professor Chase was an assistant U.S. attorney for the criminal division in Los Angeles. She has been an associate in the Los Angeles offices of Hughes, Hubbard & Reed, and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom. She is a member of the American Bar Association, the California State Bar, and is admitted to practice in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the U.S. District Court for the Central and Eastern Districts of California.

Professor Chase regularly teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, and Trial Practice, and has been honored as a Luckman Distinguished Teaching Fellow. She has commented extensively in the media on various legal topics, including the proceedings in People v. Simpson and People v. Jackson appearing for CNN, FOX-TV, E! Entertainment, KCET, and CBS-TV (Canada) and providing radio commentary for BBC (UK).

Her publications include a trial advocacy textbook, The Art & Science of Trial Advocacy (Anderson 2003), which she co-authored with Professors Perrin and Caldwell. In addition she has published "Bad Dream Team? The Simpson Defense Employs a Cynical Strategy," Los Angeles Daily Journal, February 1995; "Simpson Sideshow," Los Angeles Daily Journal, March 1995; "Police Action," Los Angeles Daily Journal, March 1995 (co-author); "Balancing Defendants' Confrontation Clause Rights Against the Need to Protect Child Abuse Victims," Los Angeles County Bar Association Litigation Newsletter; "Confronting Supreme Confusion: Balancing Defendants' Confrontation Clause Rights Against the Need to Protect Child Abuse Victims," 1993 Utah Law Review 407 (1993); "The Unruly Exclusionary Rule: Heeding Justice Blackmun's Call to Examine the Rule in Light of Changing Judicial Understanding About its Effects Outside the Courtroom," 78 Marquette Law Review 45 (1994) (co-author); "Hearing the 'Sounds of Silence' in Criminal Trials: A Look at Recent British Law Reforms with an Eye Toward Reforming the American Criminal Justice System," 44 Kansas Law Review 929 (1996); "A Challenge for Cause Against Preemptory Challenges in Criminal Proceedings," 19 Loyola International and Comparative Law Journal 507 (1997) (co-author); "If It's Broken, Fix It: Moving Beyond the Exclusionary Rule--A New and Extensive Empirical Study of the Exclusionary Rule and a Call for a Civil Administrative Remedy to Partially Replace the Rule," 83 Iowa Law Review 669 (1999) (co-author); "It is Broken: Breaking the Inertia of the Exclusionary Rule," 26 Pepperdine Law Review 971 (1999) (co-author); "Privacy Takes a Back Seat: Putting the Automobile Exception Back on Track After Several Wrong Turns," 41 Boston College Law Review (1999); "Rampart: A Crying Need to Restore Police Accountability," Loyola Law Review (2000); "The Five Faces of the Confrontation Clause," 40 Houston Law Review 1003 (2003); "Is Clawford a 'Get out of Jail Free Card' for Batterers and Abusers? An Argument for a Narrow Definition of 'Testimonials'" 84 Oregon Law Review 1093 (2006); and "Cars, Cops and Crooks: A Reexamination of Belton and Carroll with an Eye Towards Restoring Privacy Protection to Automobiles" 85 Oregon Law Review 101 (2007).

Professor Chase has also worked as a volunteer with elementary and high school children, teaching them about the American justice system and assisting them in participating in mock trials. She is an active volunteer in children's sports and holds an "F" license to coach soccer. [Mark Godsey]

More Information Carol A. Chase 

July 26, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 19, 2008

Debra A Livingston Paul J. Kellner Professor of Law

Dlivingston  Judge Livingston was appointed United States Circuit Judge for the Second Circuit on May 17, 2007 and entered on duty June 1, 2007. Prior to her appointment she was the Paul J. Kellner Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, where she also served as Vice Dean from 2005 to 2006. Judge Livingston joined the Columbia faculty in 1994. She continues to serve as a member of that faculty as the Paul J. Kellner Professor.

    Judge Livingston received her B.A., magna cum laude, in 1980 from Princeton University, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She received her J.D., magna cum laude, in 1984 from Harvard Law School, where she was an editor on the Harvard Law Review. Following law school, she served as a law clerk to Judge J. Edward Lumbard of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

    Judge Livingston was an Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of New York from 1986 to 1991 and she served as a Deputy Chief of Appeals in the Criminal Division from 1990 to 1991. She was an associate with the New York law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison from 1985 to 1986 and again from 1991 to 1992, when she elected to pursue an academic career. Judge Livingston was a member of the University of Michigan’s Law School faculty from 1992 until 1994.

    Judge Livingston is a co-author of the casebook, Comprehensive Criminal Procedure, and has published numerous academic articles on legal topics. She has taught courses in evidence, criminal law and procedure, and national security and terrorism. From 1994 to 2003, Judge Livingston was a Commissioner on New York City’s Civilian Complaint Review Board. [Mark Godsey]

More information Regarding "Debra A Livingston"

July 19, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 12, 2008

Arnold H. Loewy, professor of criminal law at Texas Tech University College of Law

Loewy He recently stated in an opinion page that the  "Death penalty should not be applied to cases of child sexual assault"  http://lubbockonline.com/stories/071208/edi_302931885.shtml

Admitted to practice in Connecticut.As the first professor to hold the Texas Tech School of Law’s new Judge George R. Killam Jr. Chair of Criminal Law, Loewy will initiate a series of annual symposiums in the area of criminal law or criminal procedure. His first two-day symposium will begin April 5 and include participation of 12 panelists with national reputations in criminal law and procedure.

In addition to his work on the annual symposiums, Loewy will teach a Supreme Court seminar and also courses in criminal law, criminal procedure, and the first amendment. In each course he will use a casebook that he has edited.

Loewy recently joined the Texas Tech School of Law faculty after having taught for 38 years at the University of North Carolina School of Law and four years at the University of Connecticut School of Law.

He received both his bachelor’s degree and Doctor of Jurisprudence from Boston University, where he achieved the top academic average in his graduating class and was a senior editor for the Boston University Law Review. Professor Loewy obtained his LL.M. from Harvard Law School in 1964.

Loewy was chair of the criminal justice section of the Association of American Law Schools in 1993 after serving for seven years on the executive board and as an officer. He also chaired the AALS Constitutional Law Section from 1973 to 1975. In addition to being an invited speaker at law schools and conferences throughout the nation, Loewy addressed the International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law in 1990 on the topic of criminal speech, in 2002 on the topic of virtual child pornography, and again in 2006 on "Systemic Changes to Reduce the Conviction of the Innocent." He also taught American Constitutional Law to European students at Katholieke University, Nijmegen, Netherlands. [Mark Godsey]

Degrees

B.S., Boston University, 1961

J.D., Boston University, 1963

LL.M., Harvard University, 1964

Courses

Criminal Law, Constitutional Law

Continue Reading about "Arnold H. Loewy"

July 12, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, July 5, 2008

Sanford H. Kadish Berkley Criminal Law Professor

                          FSBerkley_facultyphoto_2U Contact: Roxanne Livingston Sanford Kadish joined the Boalt faculty in 1964 and served as dean from 1975 to 1982. Previously, he taught at the University of Utah and the University of Michigan and also practiced with a New York firm.

Kadish has been a Guggenheim Fellow and visiting professor at Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, Kyoto-Doshisha University, the Freiburg Institute for Criminal Law, and the University of Melbourne. He has been president of both the American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Law Schools, as well as vice president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the City University of New York and Cologne University.

Kadish was editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice and his books include Discretion to Disobey; Criminal Law and Its Processes; and Blame and Punishment: Essays in Criminal Law. Recent publications include "Fifty Years of Criminal Law: An Opinionated Review," in the California Law Review (1999).

In 1991 Kadish was awarded the Berkeley Citation. In 1999 he received the ABA's Annual Research Award and was elected to the Executive Council of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Western Division.

Education:

FSU Contact: Roxanne Livingston Sanford Kadish joined the Boalt faculty in 1964 and served as dean from 1975 to 1982. Previously, he taught at the University of Utah and the University of Michigan and also practiced with a New York firm.

Kadish has been a Guggenheim Fellow and visiting professor at Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, Kyoto-Doshisha University, the Freiburg Institute for Criminal Law, and the University of Melbourne. He has been president of both the American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Law Schools, as well as vice president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the City University of New York and Cologne University.

Kadish was editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice and his books include Discretion to Disobey; Criminal Law and Its Processes; and Blame and Punishment: Essays in Criminal Law. Recent publications include "Fifty Years of Criminal Law: An Opinionated Review," in the California Law Review (1999).

In 1991 Kadish was awarded the Berkeley Citation. In 1999 he received the ABA's Annual Research Award and was elected to the Executive Council of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Western Division.

Education

B.S.S, City College of New York (1942)
LL.B., Columbia University (1948)
Dr. Jur., University of Cologne (1983)
LL.D., City University of New York (1985)
LL.D., Southwestern University (1993)

[Mark Godsey]

Continue Reading "Sanford H. Kadish Berkley Criminal Law Professor"

July 5, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 28, 2008

Robert Batey, a criminal law professor at Stetson University College of Law

Batey Robert Batey holds a bachelor's degree from Yale University and law degrees from the University of Virginia and the University of Illinois. After one year as a teaching assistant at the University of Illinois College of Law and two years as an assistant professor at West Virginia University College of Law, Batey joined the law faculty at Stetson University in 1977. During his tenure at Stetson, Professor Batey visited for one semester at the University of Virginia School of Law and served for four years as Stetson's associate dean. He has written extensively on criminal justice, law and literature, and related topics. Since 1995, he has been a local coordinator for Families Against Mandatory Minimums. [Mark Godsey]

Robert Batey
Stetson University College of Law
1401 61st Street South
St. Petersburg, FL 33707
batey@law.stetson.edu

Read More information about Robert Batey, a criminal law professor at Stetson University College of Law

June 28, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Plea Bargaining's Survival: Financial Crimes Plea Bargaining, a Continued Triumph in a Post-Enron World

This article examines the war on financial crimes that began after the collapse of Enron in 2001. Although many believed that the reforms implemented following this scandal led to greater prosecutorial focus on financial crimes and longer prison sentences, an analysis of data from 1995 through 2006 reveals that little has actually changed. The statistics demonstrate that the government's focus on financial crimes has not increased and prison sentences for fraud have remained stagnant. How could this be the case? It is this author's hypothesis that although prosecutors could have chosen to use new statutes and amendments to the United States Sentencing Guidelines passed in the wake of Enron to increase prosecutions and sentences, they did not. Instead, prosecutors are using their new tools to encourage defendants to accept plea agreements that include sentences similar to those offered before 2001, while simultaneously threatening to use these same powers to secure astounding sentences if defendants force a trial. The result is that the promises of post-Enron reforms aimed at financial criminals were hollow and served only to reinforce plea bargaining's triumph. [Lucian Emery Dervan]

Continue Reading "Plea Bargaining's Survival: Financial Crimes Plea Bargaining, a Continued Triumph in a Post-Enron World"

June 11, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, May 31, 2008

Executive Vice President and Provost Joseph A. Alutto named Alan C. Michaels as interim dean

On May 28, 2008, The Ohio State University Executive Vice President and Provost Joseph A. Alutto named Alan C. Michaels as interim dean. Michaels replaces Nancy H. Rogers, who was selected as interim Ohio Attorney General by Ohio Governor Ted Strickland.

Continue reading

May 31, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, April 11, 2008

CrimProf Spotlight: Paul Marcus

Marcus10 This week the CrimProf Blog spotlight William and Mary College of Law CrimProf Paul Marcus.

Joined the faculty in 1992. Clerked for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Practiced law at Loeb and Loeb in Los Angeles. Served as Dean of the University of Arizona School of Law, taught at the University of Illinois School of Law and was a visiting professor at the University of Geneva, University of Melbourne, University of Puerto Rico, University of San Diego and the University of Texas.

Author of Criminal Procedure in Practice, The Entrapment Defense, The Prosecution and Defense of Criminal Conspiracy Cases, and articles in the American Journal of Comparative Law and the Cornell, Georgetown, William and Mary, Florida, Southern California, and American Criminal law reviews. Co-author of Copyright and other Aspects of Law Pertaining to Literary, Musical and Artistic Works; Criminal Law: Cases and Materials; and Criminal Procedure: Cases and Materials.

Member of the American Bar Association Committees on the Rules of Criminal Procedure and Evidence, International Criminal Law, and Law School Curriculum. Chair and member of numerous committees within the Association of American Law Schools. Co-reporter for the National Right to Counsel Committee, 2004-2007.

Founder of the Literature and the Law Program at the Central Virginia Regional Jail.  Frequently interviewed by the media (Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, CBS, NPR, ABC) as an expert in criminal law and procedure. Recipient of the Distiniguished Citizen of the Year Award, University of Arizona; Volunteer of the Year Award, Williamsburg Big Brothers Mentoring Program; the Walter L. Williams, Jr. Teaching Award; and nominated by the College of William and Mary for several state and national recognition awards.

April 11, 2008 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, December 7, 2007

CrimProf Spotlight: Yale Kamisar

Kamisary This week the CrimProf Blog spotlights University of San Diego School of Law CrimProf Yale Kamisar.

Professor Yale Kamisar is the Clarence Darrow Distinguished   University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan Law   School and, since 2002, a tenured professor of law at USD. He   teaches and writes in the areas of criminal procedure, criminal   law, the administration of criminal justice and the politics of   crime. Known as the “Father of Miranda,” he is one of the nation’s   foremost authorities on criminal procedure, having written   a large number of the seminal articles and texts on the subject,   many of which have been quoted or cited by the U.S. Supreme   Court. 

Kamisar is author of Police Interrogations and   Confessions (University of Michigan Press) and co-author   of two widely-used casebooks: Constitutional Law: Cases, Comments & Questions (1st ed. 1964, 9th ed. 2001, West Publishing   Co.) (with William B. Locklear, Jesse H. Choper, Steven Shiffrin   and Richard Fallon) and Modern Criminal Procedure: Cases, Comments & Questions (1st ed. 1965, 10th ed. 2002, West Publishing   Co.) (with Wayne LaFave, Jerold Israel and Nancy King). Since   the mid-1960’s  Kamisar’s special interest has been   police interrogation and confessions.

He has also been a vigorous   defender of the “exclusionary rule” against attacks by courts   and scholars. In addition,  Kamisar is a noted expert   on issues related to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.   In 1996 he was awarded the American Bar Foundation Award   for his lifetime contributions to research and writing in law   and government. [Mark Godsey]

December 7, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, December 1, 2007

CrimProf Spotlight: Diane E. Eisenberg

Deisenberg This week, the CrimProf Blog spotlights Ave Maria Law School CrimProf Diane E.  Eisenberg.

Professor Eisenberg began her legal career in private practice, working first as an associate at the San Francisco firm of Steefel Levitt & Weiss, in the area of complex civil litigation and later at Townsend & Townsend & Crew, in the areas of intellectual property, antitrust and complex commercial litigation.

Professor Eisenberg has also served as an attorney for the administrative office of the Judicial Council of California, and has taught at Golden Gate University School of Law, the University of Michigan Law School, and Hastings College of the Law. Her course offerings include Professional Responsibility, Criminal Law, and Law and Literature.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts in English and Religious Studies from the State University of New York, Stony Brook, a Master of Arts in English and American Literature from Princeton University, and a Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School. [Mark Godsey]

December 1, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, November 24, 2007

CrimProf Spotlight: Peggy Tonon

TononThis week the CrimProf Blog spotlights University of Montana School of Law CrimProf Margaret "Peggy" Tonon

Peggy Tonon is the Director for Student Affairs, Clinical Director, and a Clinical Supervisor. A graduate of Bates College and The University of Montana School of Law, she was a Deputy County Attorney for sixteen years, where she prosecuted everything from goats running at large to deliberate homicide before joining the faculty in 1990.

As a Clinical Supervisor, she supervises the three external prosecution clinics which represent city, county, and federal governments. As Director for Student Affairs, she is responsible for academic advising and student organizations.

She has been the recipient of the Robert and Pauline Poore Faculty Service Award and the Margery Hunter Brown Faculty Merit Award recognizing service to the law school community.

She is a member of the Western Montana Bar Association and the American Bar Association. She is also a member of the Clinical Section of the Association of American Law Schools and the Clinical Legal Education Association.

Her service to the Montana Bar includes membership on the Commission on Courts of Limited Jurisdiction and the Evidence Commission.

Tonon resides in Hamilton, Montana, with her husband, Warren Neyenhuis.

November 24, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, November 2, 2007

CrimProf Spotlight: Cynthia Alkon

Alkon This week the CrimProf Blog spotlights Appalachian School of Law CrimProf Cynthia Alkon.

Cynthia Alkon joins the Appalachian School of Law after working to promote the development of rule of law in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union and after many years experience as a criminal defense attorney with the Office of the Los Angeles County Public Defender. She earned an LL.M. in Dispute Resolution from the University of Missouri-Columbia, a Juris Doctor from the University of California-Hastings, and a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations, magna cum laude, from San Francisco State University.

From 1991-1998 she worked as a Deputy Public Defender in Los Angeles handling a full range of criminal cases including a serious felony caseload in the courts in Compton and Downtown Los Angeles. In 1998 she began working in Eastern Europe. She worked in Belarus for the American Bar Association Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative promoting rule of law reform in the country. She left Belarus to work as the head of the legal department for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) in Albania.

From 2002-2006 she was the Head of the Rule of Law Unit for the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, based in Warsaw, Poland. During those years she worked in countries of the former Soviet Union and the former Yugoslavia primarily focusing on providing assistance in criminal justice reform. Her main area of academic interest is dispute resolution including how alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is used in criminal cases, and how ADR might contribute to rule of law development in countries in transition to democracy.
[Mark Godsey]

November 2, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, October 12, 2007

CrimProf Blog spotlight: Orde Kittrie

OkittrieThis week the CrimProf Blog spotlights University of Maryland School of Law CrimProf Orde Kittrie

Orde Félix Kittrie is a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Maryland School of Law during the 2007-8 academic year. He has been an Associate Professor of Law at Arizona State University since 2004.

Professor Kittrie teaches and writes in the areas of Criminal Law and International Law. Prior to joining the ASU law faculty in 2004, Professor Kittrie served for eleven years at the United States Department of State. Kittrie most recently served as the State Department's Director of International Anti-Crime Programs, overseeing United States policy and technical assistance programs for combating transnational crime worldwide. Prior to that assignment, Kittrie served as a Senior Attorney and Adviser to the Under Secretary of State for Public Affairs and Public Diplomacy, assisting with efforts to improve America's image and promote human rights and democracy in the Arab world.

Kittrie earlier served as Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of State for Economic, Business & Agricultural Affairs. In that capacity, he worked on economic aid for Pakistan following September 11, 2001 and assisted with planning for the reconstruction of Afghanistan. Kittrie also worked on U.S.-Mexico border issues and negotiation of the world's first multilateral agreement to combat computer crime. Prior to that, Kittrie served as the State Department's Senior Attorney for Nuclear Affairs. In that capacity, he negotiated five nuclear non-proliferation agreements between the United States and Russia and served as counsel for the U.S. Government's sanctions and other responses to the 1998 Indian and Pakistani nuclear tests.

Earlier in his State Department career, Kittrie specialized in trade controls governing arms and dual-use items, in which capacity he was a principal drafter of U.N. Security Council Resolutions, U.S. Executive Orders, and U.S. regulations imposing and implementing arms embargoes on terrorism-supporting and other outlaw regimes, including Rwanda during the genocide.

Prior to entering law school, Kittrie served as Press Spokesman and Legislative Assistant to U.S. Congresswoman Connie Morella (MD). Kittrie is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a board member of the Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations. A Mexican-American, Kittrie is active in the Latino community. During 2006, he served as President of Hispanic National Bar Association (HNBA) Region XIV, representing Arizona and Nevada on the HNBA Board of Governors and overseeing HNBA activities in those states.

He has also served as faculty advisor to ASU's Chicano Latino Law Students Association and as a member of the board of directors of Los Abogados, the Hispanic Bar Association of Arizona. Kittrie was honored by the Chicano Faculty Staff Association of ASU with the Dr. Manuel Servin Faculty Award for 2006. Kittrie was also recently named by Hispanic Outlook on Higher Education magazine as one of the U.S.'s top Hispanic professors of international law. [Mark Godsey]

October 12, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, September 30, 2007

CrimProf Spotlight: Mark Alexander

Alexander2This week the CrimProf Blog spotlight Seton Hall CrimProf Mark Alexander.

Mark C. Alexander is Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law. He writes and teaches in the areas of Constitutional Law, Law & Politics, The First Amendment and Criminal Procedure. His scholarship focuses on the intersection of law, politics and government and on free speech issues, with an emphasis on exploring new constitutional approaches to campaign finance reform. A recent article was cited by the Supreme Court in a major decision from 2006. In addition to his scholarly work, he recently filed a brief in the U.S. Supreme Court, defending the right of governments to limit campaign spending.

Active in politics, Prof. Alexander recently took a leave of absence to serve as General Counsel to Cory Booker and the Booker Team in the 2006 Newark Municipal elections. He then served in the same capacity for Newark in Transition, as Mayor Booker moved to assume the office. He continues to consult with the Mayor and his staff on a wide range of matters.

Other political work includes serving as Issues Director for the Bill Bradley for President campaign in 1999-2000. He was Issues Director for Senator Edward Kennedy’s Re-election in 1988, and before that, a legislative assistant to Senator Howard Metzenbaum. He also served a two-year term as an elected official in the Washington, D.C. government.

Professor Alexander also has significant international experience, including year in Spain on a Fulbright Scholarship, where he taught American law and politics. In addition he has taught in the Seton Hall Law-in-Italy program. He is also a fellow of the U.S.-Japan Leadership Program.

Professor Alexander clerked for Chief Judge Thelton Henderson of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California and was a litigator with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in San Francisco before joining the Seton Hall Law School faculty in 1996. Professor Alexander was the 1996-1997 Student Bar Association Professor of the Year, and he has been nominated for the award on numerous other occasions. He received his B.A. and J.D. from Yale University. In the spring 2003 semester, Professor Alexander returned to Yale Law School as a Visiting Scholar. [Mark Godsey]

September 30, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 21, 2007

CrimProf Blog Spotlight: Barry McCarthy

MccarthyfThis week the CrimProf Blog spotlights University of Pittsburgh Law School CrimProf Barry McCarthy.

Barry McCarthy is an expert in criminal law and procedure and in juvenile law, both in the United States and abroad. He is the former chair of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's Criminal Procedural Rules Committee (1993-1999) and currently is the chair of the Pennsylvania Juvenile Court Rules Committee.

He served as a consultant to the Law Reform Commission of Ireland for almost 20 years, and has also been a consultant to the U.S. Department of State. He was an adviser to Ireland's director of public prosecutions, and an active member of the International Bar Association. Author of Pennsylvania Juvenile Delinquency Practice and Procedure (West/Thomson 1984-2005) and coauthor of Juvenile Law and Its Processes (Lexis 1979 2003), Professor McCarthy is former chair of the Family and Juvenile Law Section of the Association of American Law Schools.

His scholarly work has appeared in New York University Law Review, Temple Law Review, and University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform, among others. He previously taught law at Capital University and University College Dublin. [Mark Godsey]

September 21, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 14, 2007

CrimProf Blog Spotlight: Charles P. Bubany

BubanyThis week the CrimProf Blog spotlights Texas Tech Law School CrimProf Charles P. Bubany.

Admitted to practice in Missouri, Professor Bubany was a note editor for the Washington University Law Quarterly. He attended a year of graduate school at the University of Illinois College of Law, taught law at West Virginia University, was a Navy JAG officer, and practiced law in St. Louis before joining the Law School faculty.

At Texas Tech, Professor Bubany coached the School of Law's National and International Champion team of the 1987 ABA Client Counseling Competition. He received the Faculty Ethics Award in 1988, 1989, and 1994; the Outstanding Law Professor Award in 1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2003; the Texas Tech Continuing Education Award in 1990; and the Faculty Service to the Professions Award from the National University Continuing Education Association in 1991.

A regular teacher of continuing education classes dealing with criminal law subjects for lawyers and nonlawyers, Professor Bubany is co-author of a casebook, Texas Criminal Procedure, and co-editor of Texas Traffic Law and Related Statutes; 1999.  An N.A.I.A. All-American golfer in college, Professor Bubany is currently engaged in research for a book on Golf and the Law. [Mark Godsey]

September 14, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 7, 2007

CrimProf Blog Spotlights Earl Dudley Jr.

DudThis week the CrimProf Blog spotlights Virginia Law CrimProf Earl Dudley Jr.

Beginning in 1982, Earl Dudley taught trial advocacy seminars at the Law School while he was a partner in the Washington, D.C. law firm of Nussbaum Owen & Webster. Then, in 1989, he became a full-time faculty member. Dudley's career, before he came to Virginia, was in private practice, except for two years when he was general counsel for the Committee on the Judiciary in the U.S. House of Representatives. At the Law School, Dudley teaches civil and criminal procedure, evidence, criminal law, constitutional law, and trial advocacy.

As a law student, Dudley was editor-in-chief of the Virginia Law Review. After graduation, he clerked for Justice Stanley Reed and Chief Justice Earl Warren of the Supreme Court of the United States. He serves on the Virginia State Bar Committee on Professionalism and was a member of the boards of directors of the Stuart Stiller Memorial Foundation, the Disability Rights Center, and the Center for the Study of Psychiatry. He was a public member of the ethics committee of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, and he has been an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, as well as a faculty member of the National Institute of Trial Advocacy in programs in various cities.

[Mark Godsey]

September 7, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 31, 2007

CrimProf Blog Spotlight: Fredric Lederer

Lederer46This week the CrimProf Blog spotlights William and Mary School of Law CrimProf Fredric Lederer.

Joined the faculty in 1980. Clerked for Judge Frederick P. Bryan, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, held various legal positions with the U.S. Army including four years on the faculty of the Judge Advocate General’s School and was a Fulbright-Hays Scholar.

Author of Fundamental Criminal Procedure, Military Law and articles in the Military Review, William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal, and Emory Law Journal. Editor of Basic Virginia Law for Non-Lawyers. Co-author of Court-Martial Procedure; An Introduction to Law, Law Study, and the Lawyer’s Role; Concepts of American Law; Aspects of American Law; Courtroom Criminal Evidence; and Defending Criminal Cases in Virginia. Co-drafter of Proposed Virginia Rules of Evidence. A principal author of the Military Rules of Evidence. Co-author and production consultant for three law-related television series and a frequent lecturer on courtroom technology.

Member of the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section’s Committee on Rules of Evidence and Procedure. Member of the Board of Directors, Virginia Consortium for Law Related Education. Founder and Director of the Center for Legal and Court Technology Project. [Mark Godsey]

August 31, 2007 in Weekly CrimProf Spotlight | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)