CrimProf Blog

Editor: Kevin Cole
Univ. of San Diego School of Law

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

"Notable new analysis of US incarceration levels and recent (modest) changes"

Doug Berman has this post at Sentencing Law & Policy. From  his excerpt:

Although the US prison population has declined over six years, after increasing for nearly four decades, a new analysis by researcher Malcolm C. Young, published by the Center for Community Alternatives, concludes that the nation is not reducing prison populations at a pace that would end mass incarceration in the foreseeable future.

A report issued in January by the Bureau of Justice Statistics of data through 2016 found that prison populations decreased in 33 states that year — more states than had experienced decreases in any recent year. The average decrease was three percent. In 42 states, prison populations were lower than they had been recently.  Just eight states increased their prison populations to record high numbers.

The downturn it documented, while perhaps marking the beginning of an end to three-and-a-half decades of increases, “is anemic to the point of listlessness,” says Young, a longtime advocate of cutting prison populations. If the numbers of inmates continue to decrease only at the rate they did between 2014 and2016, there will still be more than a million people incarcerated in prison in 2042. The nation wouldn’t reach the goal of groups like #Cut50.org to reduce prison populations to half of what they are today for another 50 years, until 2068.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/crimprof_blog/2018/06/notable-new-analysis-of-us-incarceration-levels-and-recent-modest-changes.html

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