CrimProf Blog

Editor: Kevin Cole
Univ. of San Diego School of Law

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Symposium on Experts, Inference and Innocence

Seton Hall Law Review will hold this symposium, in honor of the D. Michael Risinger on the occasion of his retirement, on October 27-28. The distinguished slate of speakers follows the jump.

 

Experts, Inference and Innocence

A Symposium in Honor of the Work of D. Michael Risinger

October 27 to 28, 2017

 

Biographies

 

Simon A. Cole, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and Director of the Newkirk Center for Science & Society, University of California, Irvine

Professor Cole specializes in the historical and sociological study of the interaction between science, technology, law, and criminal justice. He is the author of Suspect Identities: A History of Fingerprinting and Criminal Identification (Harvard University Press, 2001), which was awarded the 2003 Rachel Carson Prize by the Society for Social Studies of Science. Most recently, he is a co-author (with Michael Lynch, Ruth McNally & Kathleen Jordan) of Truth Machine: The Contentious History of DNA Fingerprinting (University of Chicago Press, 2008), in addition to numerous scholarly journal articles on related subjects. Professor Cole has spoken widely on the subjects of fingerprinting, scientific evidence, and science and the law, and he has consulted and testified as an expert witness on the validity of fingerprint evidence. He has also written for many general interest publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, New Scientist, and Lingua Franca. His current interests are the sociology of forensic science and the development of criminal identification databases and biometric technologies. He teaches courses on Forensic Science and Society, Surveillance and Society, Miscarriages of Justice, The Death Penalty, Historical Criminology, and Science, Technology, and Law, and he is Co-Editor of the journal Theoretical Criminology. He is Director of The Newkirk Center for Science & Society, and he is affiliated with the Department of History.  He is also Associate Editor of the National Registry of Exonerations.

Jennifer L. Mnookin, Dean and David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, and Co-Director, Program on Understanding Law, Science & Evidence, UCLA School of Law

Dean Mnookin became dean of the UCLA Law School in August of 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13.  A leading evidence scholar, Dean Mnookin is founder and co-director the Program on Understanding Law, Science & Evidence (PULSE@UCLA Law).  She is a co-author of two major treatises—The New Wigmore, A Treatise on Evidence: Expert Evidence, and Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony. She has published extensively on issues relating to forensic science, including latent fingerprint identification, handwriting expertise, and DNA evidence, and has advocated developing a “research culture” in these areas.  Dean Mnookin is also known for her scholarship on evidence theory, the Confrontation Clause, and visual and photographic evidence. 

Dean Mnookin holds and A.B. from Harvard University, a J.D. from Yale Law School and a Ph.D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology from M.I.T.  She is a member of the National Academy of Science’s Committee on Law Science and Technology and the American Law Institute, and served as a Senior Advisor to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology’s Report, “Forensic Science in Criminal Courts: Ensuring Scientific Validity of Feature-Comparison Methods.”Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13.Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13.Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13.Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13. Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13.

As dean she has worked to build upon UCLA Law’s reputation for excellence and access, and to support a collaborative and engaged environment among students, the school’s renowned faculty and its 16,000 alumni. Initiatives she has spearheaded include the first alumnae leadership conference; new programs in human rights, criminal justice and immigration; and the expansion of clinical opportunities in areas ranging from veterans’ needs to documentary filmmaking.

David S. Caudill, Arthur M. Goldberg Professor of Law, Villanova University Widger School of Law

Professor Caudill joined The Villanova Law faculty in 2005 as Professor of Law and the first Arthur M. Goldberg Family Chair.  Professor Caudill earned his J.D. from the University of Houston Law Center, and was Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review, and Articles Editor of the Houston Journal of International Law. After graduating from the University of Houston Law Center, Professor Caudill clerked for the Honorable John Brown of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit before joining Gray, Cary, Ames & Frye in San Diego and then Graves, Dougherty, Hearon & Moody in Austin. While in Austin, he also taught as adjunct professor at the University of Texas. He joined the Washington and Lee School of Law faculty in 1989. He also has taught as a visiting professor at the University of Texas, Southern Illinois University, Cardozo School of Law and the University of Florida, and is currently a Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne Law Faculty.

Professor Caudill earned his Ph.D. in philosophy from the Free University of Amsterdam, and his B.A. in philosophy from Michigan State University. More recently, he has completed postdoctoral graduate work at the Science and Technology Studies Program at Virginia Tech, and at the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute.  He received a grant from the Program on Scientific Knowledge and Public Policy (SKAPP) in 2007 to study local water pollution controversies, and he was the 2007/2008 Société de Chimie Industrielle (American Section) Fellow; he was in residence at the Chemical Heritage Foundation (Philadelphia) in the spring of 2008.  Professor Caudill's research and scholarly interests focus on law and science studies, law and literature, and sports and entertainment law.

Andrew Sulner, Document Examiner, Andrew Sulner M.S., J.D., Forensic Document Examinations, LLC, New York, New York

Andrew Sulner is a board certified forensic document examiner and attorney who earned a Master of Science degree in Forensic Science from George Washington University and J.D (with Honors) from George Washington University Law School, both in 1975. The Sulner name is associated with three generations of document examiners, and Andrew Sulner has over 40 years of experience in examining questioned and disputed documents on behalf of major law firms, banks, insurance companies and financial institutions, as well as federal and state law enforcement and regulatory agencies. Mr. Sulner, who is also a certified fraud examiner and former state prosecutor, has been consulted nationally and internationally as an expert in determining the authenticity of documents, and his testimony as a forensic document examiner has been favorably cited in numerous federal and state court decisions. Mr. Sulner’s state-of-the-art forensic document laboratory is located in the heart of New York City.

In addition to being a Diplomate of the Board of Forensic Document Examiners (BFDE), Mr. Sulner is a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) and a member of the Association of Forensic Document Examiners (AFDE), the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, and the New York, Florida, California and District of Columbia Bars.  Mr. Sulner is a past Chair of the Jurisprudence Section of the AAFS and a past President of the BFDE and The New York Society of Medical Jurisprudence and Forensic Sciences.

Mr. Sulner has authored professional publications and presentations on the subject of forensic document examination, and he is a frequent speaker and lecturer at universities and continuing education seminars sponsored by forensic science, legal, judicial, and other professional membership associations throughout the United States. He has also appeared as a forensic document examiner on many television shows, including ABC’s “20/20” and news shows aired by CBS, NBC, FoxTV and others.

 

  1. Michael Risinger, John J. Gibbons Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law

 

Professor Risinger holds a B.A. from Yale University, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  He is a past chair of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Civil Procedure, a past chair of the AALS Section on Evidence, a life member of the American Law Institute, and was for 25 years a member of the New Jersey Supreme Court Committee on Evidence, which was responsible for the current version of the New Jersey Rules of Evidence.  He was a member of the Human Factors Subcommittee of the National Commission on Forensic Science until that Commission’s sad demise in April of 2017, and he is currently a member of the Human Factors Committee of the Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) of the National Institute for Science and Technology (NIST).  He is the author of two chapters in Faigman, Kaye, Cheng and Mnookin, Murphy, Sanders & Slobogin, Modern Scientific Evidence (“Handwriting Identification” and “A Proposed Taxonomy of Expertise”). He is also the author of dozens of articles and book chapters on a diverse range of subjects, including many articles on expert evidence issues, and on issues concerning the plight of the convicted innocent.  He is in addition Associate Director of the Last Resort Exoneration Project at Seton Hall, which is devoted to freeing the convicted innocent of New Jersey.

In January of 2017, he was awarded the John Henry Wigmore Award for Lifetime Achievement in Elucidating the Law of Evidence and the Process of Proof by the Evidence Section of the Association of American Law Schools.

Michael J. Saks, Regents' Professor - College of Law and Department of Psychology, and Faculty Fellow, Center for Law, Science & Innovation, Arizona State University

 

Professor Sak’s research interests focus on empirical studies of law and the legal system, especially decision-making in the legal process, evidence law, the law's use of science, the behavior of the litigation system, and legal policy affecting medical patient safety. He has served as editor of the journals Law & Human Behavior and Jurimetrics, as president of the American Psychology-Law Society and chair of the Section on Law and Social Science of the AALS. Among his approximately 250 publications (including 11 books), he has been co-editor/co-author of Modern Scientific Evidence (five volumes) and the Annotated Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence. Co-author of The Psychological Foundations of Evidence Law (2016). His article on The Behavior of the Tort Litigation System, 140 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1147 (1992), has been the most-cited tort law article in the past 25 years. His work has earned numerous awards and been cited in a number of judicial opinions, including by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Before coming to ASU in 2000, Saks was the Edward F. Howrey Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at the University of Iowa, after starting his academic career at Boston College, and serving on the staff of the National Center for State Courts. Courses he has taught include criminal law, evidence, law and science, and torts. He has also taught courses in scientific evidence to appellate judges in the University of Virginia Law School’s LL.M. program for appellate judges and in Duke Law School’s “Judging Science” program, as well as to law faculty at the Georgetown University Law Center and the Ohio State University.  In addition to his Ph.D., Saks earned an M.S.L. from the Yale Law School.

Dan Simon, Richard L. and Maria B. Crutcher Professor of Law and Psychology, USC Gould School of Law

Dan Simon specializes in the field of Law & Psychology. He teaches Criminal Law, as well as various courses in the intersection of law and psychology. He also teaches a course on law and psychology at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. Simon is the author of In Doubt: The Psychology of the Criminal Justice Process (Harvard University Press, 2012).  Following the publication of In Doubt, Simon has been invited to lecture on the psychological dimensions of the criminal justice process to groups of judges, prosecutors and police personnel across the United States and in Israel.

Simon’s publications in law reviews include The Limited Diagnosticity of Criminal Trials (Vanderbilt Law Review, 2011); A Third View of the Black Box: Cognitive Coherence in Legal Decision Making (The University of Chicago Law Review, 2004), and A Psychological Model of Judicial Decision Making (Rutgers Law Journal, 1988). He has also published a number of articles in experimental psychological journals, including "The Construction of Preferences by Constraint Satisfaction" (Psychological Science, 2004; with co-authors), "The Redux of cognitive consistency theories: Evidence judgments by constraint satisfaction" (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2004; with co-authors), and “Bidirectional Reasoning in Decision Making by Constraint Satisfaction” (Journal of Experimental Psychology—General, 1999, with Keith J. Holyoak).

Simon has been a visiting professor at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, Columbia Law School, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. He earned an SJD degree from Harvard Law School, an MBA from INSEAD in France, and an LLB from Tel Aviv University. He worked as an attorney for the Association for Civil Rights in Israel as human rights lawyer on the West Bank. Before joining the USC Gould School of Law in 1999, Simon was a member of the faculty of the University of Haifa Law School. He serves as an ad hoc referee for academic presses, peer-reviewed journals in experimental psychology, and the National Science Foundation.

David L. Faigman, Chancellor & Dean, and John F. Digardi Distinguished Professor of Law, U.C. Hastings College of the Law, and Professor in the School of Medicine (Dept. of Psychiatry), Univ. of California, San Francisco

Dean Faigman received his M.A. (Psychology) and J.D. from the University of Virginia, and clerked for the Honorable Thomas M. Reavley, Senior Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  He is the author of over 50 articles and essays, and has published in a variety of outlets, including the Chicago, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Northwestern law reviews, Science, Sociological Methods & Research and Nature Reviews Neuroscience. He is also the author of three books, Constitutional Fictions: A Unified Theory of Constitutional Facts (Oxford, 2008), Laboratory of Justice: The Supreme Court’s 200-Year Struggle to Integrate Science and the Law (Henry Holt & Co. 2004) and Legal Alchemy: The Use and Misuse of Science in the Law (W.H. Freeman, 1999). In addition, Dean Faigman is a co-author/co-editor of the five-volume treatise Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony (with Cheng, Mnookin, Murphy Sanders & Slobogin). The treatise has been cited widely by courts, including several times by the U.S. Supreme Court.  Dean Faigman was a member of the National Academies of Science panel that investigated the scientific validity of polygraphs, the MacArthur Law and Neuroscience Network, and served as a Senior Advisor to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology’s Report, “Forensic Science in Criminal Courts: Ensuring Scientific Validity of Feature-Comparison Methods.”

Jules Epstein, Professor of Law and Director of Advocacy Programs, Temple University Beasley School of Law

 

Jules Epstein is Professor of Law and Director of Advocacy Programs at Temple University Beasley School of Law.  He served as a Professor of Law and the Director of the Taishoff Advocacy, Technology, and Public Service Institute at Widener School of Law before joining the faculty at Temple. He is a former partner at the highly respected Philadelphia criminal defense and civil rights firm of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing & Feinberg, LLP, where he remains of counsel. Professor Epstein teaches criminal law and evidence courses.

A 1978 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Law, Professor Epstein began his legal career with the Defender Association of Philadelphia. He was an adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1988 through 2006, has taught in and prepared materials for countless continuing legal education programs, locally and nationally, and has authored dozens of articles and book chapters on criminal law and evidence topics, and he has served on the faculty of the National Judicial College teaching courses to judges in advanced evidence and capital case law.

 Professor Epstein’s work has concentrated, in recent years, on capital cases, eyewitness issues and the issues raised by forensic science. He continues to handle capital cases at the appellate and post-conviction stages. In the area of eyewitness evidence, he has lectured, authored both articles and book chapters, and served as an expert witness.  In regard to forensic science, Professor Epstein served as a member of the National Commission on Forensic Science from 2013 until the Commission’s demise in 2017.  He was co-editor of SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE REVIEW: ADMISSIBILITY AND THE USE OF EXPERT EVIDENCE IN THE COURTROOM, MONOGRAPH NO. 9, (ABA Books, 2013) and THE FUTURE OF EVIDENCE (ABA Books, 2011). In Pennsylvania, he is a member of a group of lawyers, judges and academics revising the Suggested Standard Jury Instruction, Criminal, and served on a commission addressing issues in cases of wrongful convictions.

William C. Thompson, Professor of Criminology, Law, and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior; and Law, University of California, Irvine

 

Professor Thompson received a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University and a J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He studies human judgment and decision making with a particular focus on cognitive and contextual bias in scientific assessments, on the use (and misuse) of scientific and statistical evidence in the courtroom, and on lay perceptions of scientific and statistical evidence, resulting in dozens of articles in both scientific journals and law journals.  His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Justice, and the Center for Statistics and Applications in Forensic Evidence (CSAFE). Thompson was a member of the Task Force that drafted the ABA’s Standards on DNA Evidence, he served on the California Crime Laboratory Review Task Force, and he has been a member of SWG-Speaker—the scientific working group on speaker identification. He was a member of the Human Factors Subcommittee of the National Commission on Forensic Science and is Chair of the Human Factors Committee of the Organization of Scientific Advisory Committees for Forensic Science (OSAC), a federal body devoted to improving standards in forensic science.  He recently chaired the expert panel that prepared a report for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) on Latent Fingerprint Examination.  Although primarily an academic, he has (as a lawyer) represented parties in both criminal and civil matters involving scientific and statistical evidence.

Richard D. Friedman, Alene and Allan F. Smith Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School

Professor Friedman is an expert on evidence and U.S. Supreme Court history. He is also one of a few scholars developing a new field, examining sports and games as legal systems. Professor Friedman is the general editor of The New Wigmore, a multi-​volume treatise on evidence. His textbook, The Elements of Evidence, is now in its fourth edition, and he is coauthor of Park & Friedman's Evidence: Cases and Materials, now in its 12th edition. He also has written many law review articles and essays. In Crawford v. Washington, 541 U.S. 36 (2004), the U.S. Supreme Court radically transformed the law governing the right of an accused to "be confronted with the witnesses against him" by adopting a "testimonial" approach, which Professor Friedman had long advocated; he now maintains the Confrontation Blog to comment on related issues and developments, and he has successfully argued two follow-up cases, Hammon v. Indiana and Briscoe v. Virginia, in the Supreme Court. Professor Friedman earned a BA and a JD from Harvard, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review, and a DPhil in modern history from Oxford University. He clerked for Chief Judge Irving R. Kaufman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, then practiced law in New York City. He joined the Law School faculty in 1988 from Cardozo Law School. He is a 2010 recipient of the Patriot Award from the Washtenaw County Bar Association.

Barbara A. Spellman, Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law

Barbara A. Spellman received a J.D. (1982) from New York University School of Law and a Ph.D. (1993) in Psychology from UCLA.  Her empirical research is in the area of higher-order cognition – thinking, reasoning, memory, and metacognition – with particular emphasis on causal, counterfactual, analogical, and inductive reasoning.  She applies psychological science to issues in judge and jury decision-making, forensics, and evidence law.  In addition to Evidence, she teaches various courses on the intersection of psychology and law (e.g., Behavioral Decision Making and Law; Psychology of the Deciders: Judges, Juries, Jurors).  Spellman is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, and the Association for Psychological Science.  She was editor-in-chief of Perspectives on Psychological Science from 2011-2015, which published over 100 articles on the recent changing norms in science under her watch.  She is the co-author of The Psychological Foundations of Evidence Law (with Michael J. Saks) (New York University Press, 2016).

Ronald J. Allen, John Henry Wigmore Professor of Law, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

 

Professor Allen did his undergraduate work in mathematics at Marshall University and studied law at the University of Michigan.  He is an internationally recognized expert in the fields of evidence, criminal procedure, and constitutional law.  He has published seven books and over 100 articles in major law reviews.  He has been quoted in national news outlets hundreds of times, and appears regularly on national broadcast media on matters ranging from constitutional law to criminal justice.  He has worked with various groups in China to help formulate proposals for legal reform, and he was recently retained by the Tanzanian Government to assist in the reform of their evidence law.

Professor Allen began his career at the State University of New York, and has held professorships at the University of Iowa and Duke University prior to coming to Northwestern.  He has lectured on his research at universities across the world, among them Columbia University, Cornell University, University of Chicago, University of Virginia, University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, Duke University, Oxford University, University of London, Leiden University, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, University of Edinburgh, University of British Columbia, the University of Paris (Sorbonne), Parma University, Turin University, Pavia University, University of Adelaide, Australia, and Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, and UNAM, Mexico City.  In 1991, he was the University Distinguished Visiting Scholar, at the University of Adelaide, South Australia. One of his books has been translated into Chinese by the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China, and he has been invited to China for a series of lectures each year from 2004 to 2017.  He was appointed the inaugural Fellow of the Procedural Law Research Center of the China University of Political Science and Law, Beijing, and Chair of the Board of Advisors of the new Evidence and Forensic Science Institute in Beijing.   In April of 2007, the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China announced that he had been designated as a Yangtze River Scholar, only the fourth American and first law professor (Chinese or foreign) to be so honored.  In 2014, he was given the highest honor China accords to foreigner nationals when he received the China Friendship Award from the Premier of China.  He has also been invited to lecture by the governments of Mexico, Spain, and Trinidad/Tobago.  For the last ten years, his research has focused on the nature of juridical proof.


He is a member of the American Law Institute, has chaired the Evidence Section of the Association of American Law Schools, and was Vice-chair of the Rules of Procedure and Evidence Committee of the American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section.  He has served as a Commissioner of the Illinois Supreme Court, assigned to the Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission. He is presently on the Boards of the Constitutional Rights Foundation-Chicago, and the Yeager Society of Scholars of Marshall University. He has served on various boards and committees of civic and cultural institutions in Chicago, and presently is a member of the Board of the Joffrey Ballet.

Dale A. Nance, John Homer Kapp Professor of Law, Case Western Reserve University School of Law

An internationally recognized evidence scholar, Professor Nance also teaches and writes about jurisprudence and legal theory. Before joining the Faculty at Case Western Reserve in 2002, Professor Nance taught law at Chicago-Kent, where he was named a Norman and Edna Freehling Scholar and Associate Dean for Program Development. He has also taught at Northern Illinois University, and University of Colorado, the University of San Diego, and Cornell University. Professor Nance is the author of The Burdens of Proof: Discriminatory Power, Weight of Evidence, and Tenacity of Belief (Cambridge U. P. 2016), and he is a reviser for the next edition of Wigmore on Evidence and is the author of numerous law review articles and the textbook, Law and Justice: Cases and Readings on the American Legal System (1994; 1999).

Michael S. Pardo, Henry Upson Sims Professor of Law, University of Alabama School of Law

Professor Pardo is the Henry Upson Sims Professor of Law at The University of Alabama School of Law. He joined the faculty in 2005. His teaching and scholarship are in the areas of evidence, criminal procedure, civil procedure, philosophy of law, and law and neuroscience.  His research focuses on philosophical issues pertaining to evidence, procedure, and legal proof.     

Professor Pardo is the author of two books and approximately forty articles, essays, and book chapters.  His books include: An Analytical Approach to Evidence (6th edition, Wolters Kluwer, 2016, with Allen et al) and Minds, Brains, and Law (Oxford University Press, 2013, with Patterson). He also co-edited, Philosophical Foundations of Law and Neuroscience (Oxford University Press, 2016, with Patterson).  Professor Pardo’s publications have appeared in several distinguished journals, including the William & Mary, Vanderbilt, Boston College, Illinois, Northwestern, Texas, and Iowa Law Reviews, and in Legal Theory, Law & Philosophy, Jurisprudence, Neuroethics, and the Journal of Legal Studies, among others. 

Professor Pardo is a founder and co-director the University of Alabama School of Law’s Program on Cross-Disciplinary Legal Studies, and he has served as Chair of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Evidence. 

Kevin M. Clermont, Robert D. Ziff Professor of Law, Cornell Law School

Professor Clermont is a specialist in the procedural aspects of litigation. After his graduation from Harvard Law School, Mr. Clermont clerked for the late Hon. Murray Gurfein of the Southern District of New York, and then spent two years in private practice as an associate at Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton.

Since joining the Cornell Law School Faculty in 1974, Professor Clermont has authored a good number of books on civil procedure. His coauthored casebook, Materials for a Basic Course in Civil Procedure, is regarded as a model of careful legal craftsmanship and also a thoughtful introduction for students.  In addition to his work in civil procedure, Professor Clermont has had a longstanding interest in standards of proof, and has written a series of articles on the subject, culminating in the 2013 book Standards of Decision in Law: Psychological and Logical Bases for the Standard of Proof, Here and Abroad.

Edward K Cheng, Professor of Law and current FedEx Research Professor, Vanderbilt University Law School

Professor Cheng's research focuses on scientific and expert evidence, and the interaction between law and statistics. Professor Cheng is a coauthor of Modern Scientific Evidence, a five-volume treatise that is updated annually, and he is the host of Excited Utterance, a podcast focusing on scholarship in evidence and proof. His articles, in which he explores evidence law from an empirical and statistical perspective, have been published in the Yale Law Journal, Columbia Law Review and Stanford Law Review, among other prestigious law journals. He holds a B.S.E. (summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) in electrical engineering from Princeton University, where he also earned a certificate from the Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs; an M.Sc. in information systems (with distinction) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he was a Fulbright Scholar; and a J.D. (cum laude) from Harvard Law School, where he was the articles, book reviews, and commentaries chair of the Harvard Law Review. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in statistics at Columbia University. Professor Cheng teaches Evidence, Torts, and Statistical Concepts for Lawyers, and is a six-time winner of the Hall-Hartman Outstanding Professor Award for excellence in teaching. He was also selected by the graduating classes of 2013 and 2017 to be their commencement speaker.

Edward J. Imwinkelried, Edward L. Barrett, Jr. Professor of Law Emeritus, U.C. Davis School of Law

 

Professor Imwinkelried could easily be a model for a character in crime fiction. News stories quoting him have included "Probers Use DNA Tests to Find Killer in Florida," "Love-Triangle Killing: Defense Questions Police," and "Will High-Tech Sleuthing Hold Up in Court?" To the country's prosecutors and defense attorneys, he is the one to consult about the admissibility of scientific evidence and evidence of uncharged crimes.

"These are two very specialized areas of evidence," said Imwinkelried. "They also happen to be the two areas that place a premium on creativity and imagination."

Imwinkelried wrote the book on scientific evidence, literally and figuratively. The Supreme Court itself cited the book in its landmark 1993 case, Daubert v Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals on expert testimony. Now in a forthcoming fifth edition, Scientific Evidence treats such subjects as DNA typing, forensic psychiatry, and laser techniques for fingerprint detection.

The admission of evidence of uncharged crimes, the topic of another of his books, is the "single most litigated issue on the criminal side of the law," he said. Such evidence often looms large in cases of mass murderers. Before the O.J. Simpson trial, the Trial of the 20th Century was the prosecution of Wayne Williams for the Atlanta child killings. "Wayne Williams, for instance, was charged on two counts, but the hair and fiber evidence showed a pattern that pulled together 10 other killings," said Imwinkelried. "Once a jury is allowed to hear that, the whole atmosphere of the trial changes and the likelihood of a conviction increases dramatically.

Aviva A. Orenstein, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Professor of Law and Val Nolan Faculty Fellow, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Professor Orenstein writes and teaches in the area of evidence. Her scholarly interests concern the intersection of evidence law and culture, and she is currently writing about jurors’ emotions and how the emotion of regret can justify rules excluding character evidence.

Professor Orenstein also teaches Civil Procedure and, occasionally, Family Law, Legal Profession, and Children and the Law. For the past three years, she has taught American evidence law in China. On her recent sabbatical she studied Bible, Talmud, and Jewish law as a visiting second-year student in the Hebrew College Rabbinical School in Newton, MA. Her Aramaic is much improved and her appreciation for the cultural aspects of legal interpretation has deepened.

In 2000-2001, Orenstein directed the Child Advocacy Clinic, supervising law students who serve as guardians ad litem for children in contested-custody cases. She has served as a court-appointed special advocate for abused and neglected children and currently performs pro bono work in the local juvenile court. In 2004-2005, Orenstein was a fellow at the Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, where she participated in a seminar on "The Ethics and Politics of Childhood."

Orenstein founded and supervises an Outreach for Legal Literacy, a program through which law students teach constitutional law and civics to local fifth-graders. She has written and produced a number of plays on legal and ethical questions used for the professional development of law students and the local bar. Orenstein was a humor columnist for the Bloomington Herald-Times and still runs into folks who have put laminated copies of her essays on their refrigerator.  No one does this with her scholarship.  In 2016, her debut novel, Fat Chance, was published to little acclaim but much personal delight. Orenstein is the mother of three grown sons.  She was named associate dean for academic affairs in 2017.

JoAnne A. Epps, Provost, Temple University, and former Dean, Temple University Beasley School of Law

A member of the faculty of Temple Law School since 1985, JoAnne Epps served as Dean of Temple Law School from 2008-2016.  In July, she stepped down as Dean to assume the role of Executive Vice President and Provost of Temple University.  She is the author and co-author of several books and articles on Evidence and Trial Advocacy. Commemorating Black History Month, in February 2015 U.S. Senator Robert P. Casey, Jr. honored Epps at the U.S. Senate.  From March 2015 until January 2017, Epps was the chair of a Police Community Oversight Board created by Mayor Michael Nutter. In June 2017, Epps was honored by The Legal Intelligencer as a Distinguished Leader in her field.  In May 2017, Epps received the Consular Award on Italian National Day by the Consulate General of Italy and was also the recipient of the Inaugural JoAnne Epps Award by the Barristers’ Association of Philadelphia. In November 2016, Epps was honored by The Philadelphia Inquirer as one of the inaugural class members of the Philadelphia Business Hall of Fame.  In 2015, the National Association of Women Lawyers presented her with the M. Ashley Dickerson Award for her work towards diversity in the legal profession. In 2014, Epps was awarded the Justice Sonia Sotomayor Diversity Award by the Philadelphia Bar Association and in 2009 received the Association’s Sandra Day O’Connor Award for her efforts to advance women in the profession and the community.  A three-time honoree by Lawyers of Color Magazine as one of the 100 most influential black lawyers in the country, Epps was named by National Jurist Magazine in 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 as one of the 25 most influential people in legal education.  She serves on several non-profit Boards, is a Board of Director for the American Bar Association Retirement Funds, is a member of the Philadelphia Board of Ethics, and is the court-appointed monitor of the settlement of the lawsuit challenging Philadelphia’s stop and frisk activity. Epps is a former Deputy City Attorney for the City of Los Angeles and Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Alex Stein, Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School

Professor Alex Stein is a widely published expert on torts, medical malpractice, evidence, and general legal theory. His writings combine law with economic theories and moral philosophy. He has written three books—Foundations of Evidence Law, Tort Liability Under Uncertainty, (with Ariel Porat), and An Analytical Approach to Evidence: Text, Cases and Problems (With Ronald J. Allen et al.),—and more than 60 articles that have appeared in scholarly journals including Columbia Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, Harvard Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Northwestern University Law Review, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Texas Law Review, University of Illinois Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vanderbilt Law Review, Virginia Law Review, and Washington Law Review.

Prior to joining Brooklyn Law School, Professor Stein was on the faculty at Cardozo (2004–16) and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1991–2004). During his career, he has held visiting professor appointments at several schools including Columbia Law School, Yale Law School, and most recently, Harvard Law School. He is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Evidence & Proof and was one of the founding editors of Theoretical Inquiries in Law

Professor Stein runs an e-journal, STEIN on Medical Malpractice, and he is a permanent contributor to the Bill of Health, a blog published by the Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School.

Larry Laudan, Lecturer, University of Texas Law School

Professor Laudan is one of the 20th century’s leading philosophers of science.  See his Wikipedia entry, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Laudan.  He is a past President of the American Philosophical Association and the International Charles Sanders Peirce Society. In an unusual pivot of professional focus, a dozen years ago he turned his attention to the problems of decision thresholds and the performance of the criminal justice system.  The result was Truth, Error and Criminal Law: An Essay in Legal Epistemology (2006), followed by a series of provocative articles with Ron Allen including Deadly Dilemmas 41 Texas Tech L.Rev. 65 (2008), Deadly Dilemas II: Bail and Crime, 85 Chi. Kent L. Rev 23 (2010); The Devastating Impact of Prior Crimes Evidence and Other Myths of the Criminal Justice Process, 101 J. Crim. L. & Criminology 493 (2011) and Deadly Dilemmas III Some Kind Words for Preventive Detention, 101 J. Crim. L. & Criminology 781 (2011), culminating in his most recent book The Law's Flaws: Rethinking Trial and Errors? (2016).

Keith A. Findley, Associate Professor of Law, University of Wisconsin Law School, and Co-founder and Senior Advisor to the Wisconsin Innocence Project

Keith Findley joined the tenure track faculty at Wisconsin in the fall of 2012, after more than 20 years as a clinical professor, and another 6 years as a public defender.  He currently teaches Evidence, Wrongful Convictions, and Criminal Procedure.  In 1997, along with Professor John Pray, he co-founded the Wisconsin Innocence Project, and he served as co-director of the project until the spring of 2017, when he assumed the role of Senior Advisor to the Project.  For five years, from 2009 to November 2014, he served as president of the Innocence Network, an affiliation of nearly 70 innocence organization throughout the world.  

Prof. Findley's primary areas of expertise are in wrongful convictions, criminal law and procedure, and appellate advocacy. He has previously worked as an Assistant State Public Defender in Wisconsin, both in the Appellate and Trial Divisions. He has litigated hundreds of post-conviction and appellate cases, at all levels of state and federal courts, including the United States Supreme Court.  He also lectures and teaches nationally on wrongful convictions, forensic science, evidence, and appellate advocacy.  His scholarly agenda focuses on the causes of and remedies for wrongful convictions, and he is the author of more than two dozen articles and book chapters on these issues.

Marvin Zalman, Professor of Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Wayne State University

Professor Zalman earned a Ph.D. in criminal justice from the State University of New York at Albany and a J.D. from Brooklyn Law School. He taught at Michigan State University’s School of Criminal Justice and as a law lecturer at Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, Nigeria. Earlier writings focus on sentencing, constitutional criminal procedure and criminal justice policy issues. Since 2005 his research focused on wrongful conviction. Publications include a co-edited anthology, with Julia Carrano, Wrongful Conviction and Criminal Justice Reform: Making Justice (Routledge, 2014). “Criminal Justice System Reform and Wrongful Conviction: A Research Agenda” (Criminal Justice Policy Review, 2006) suggested research paths for criminologists, and a newsletter review (“Wrongful Convictions and Criminal Justice: A Challenge and Invitation,” ACJS Today, January 2017) summarizes criminological innocence research.  “Measuring Wrongful Convictions” (Springer Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice, 2014) summarizes research related to estimating the incidence of wrongful convictions. 

Empirical studies include Smith, Zalman & Kiger, “How Justice System Officials View Wrongful  Conviction,” Crime & Delinquency (2011); Zalman, Smith & Kiger, “Officials’ Estimates of the Incidence of ‘Actual Innocence’ Convictions,” Justice Quarterly (2008); Zalman, Larson, & Smith, “Citizens’ Attitudes Toward Wrongful Convictions,” Criminal Justice Review (2012); Zalman, Rubino & Smith, “Beyond Police Compliance with Electronic Recording of Interrogation Legislation: Toward Error Reduction,” Criminal Justice Policy Review (2017).

Law review articles include Zalman, An Integrated Justice Model of Wrongful Convictions,” Albany Law Review (2010/2011); Zalman & Carrano, Sustainability of Innocence Reform, Albany Law Review (2013/2014); Zalman & Grunewald, Reinventing the Trial: The Innocence Revolution and Proposals to Modify the American Criminal Trial, Texas A & M Law Review (2015); and Zalman & Larson, Elephants in the Station House: Serial Crimes, Wrongful Convictions, and Expanding Wrongful Conviction Analysis to Include Police Investigation, Albany Law Review (2015/2016).

Professor Zalman has written chapters on wrongful convictions and interrogation in China with Yuning Wu, chapters with Nancy Marion on wrongful conviction and the public policy process, on detective work and wrongful convictions, and on the work of Edwin Borchard.   

Erik Lillquist, Associate Provost for Academic Projects, Seton Hall University, and Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law

Professor Lillquist teaches in the areas of criminal law and procedure, evidence and intellectual property.  He joined the faculty of Seton Hall Law School in 1999. From 2001 to 2009, he was the Director of The Gibbons Institute of Law, Science & Technology. He was named Associate Dean for Finance and Administration in 2007 and became Senior Associate Dean in 2009. He currently serves as Associate Provost for Academic Projects at Seton Hall University.

A leading evidence scholar, Dean Mnookin is founder and faculty co-director of PULSE @ UCLA Law (the Program on Understanding Law, Science & Evidence). She is a co-author of two major evidence treatises, The New Wigmore, A Treatise on Evidence: Expert Evidence and Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony. She has published extensively on issues relating to forensic science, including latent fingerprint identification, handwriting expertise and DNA evidence, and has advocated for developing a “research culture” in these areas. Dean Mnookin is also known for her scholarship on expert evidence, evidence theory, the Confrontation Clause, and visual and photographic evidence.

Dean Mnookin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Science, Technology and Law. She co-chaired a group of senior advisors for a President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on use of forensic science in criminal courts, and is on the advisory board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. Dean Mnookin serves on the steering committee of the Association of American Law Schools’ Deans Forum. She was elected to the American Law Institute in 2011.

Prior to joining UCLA Law, Dean Mnookin was professor of law and Barron F. Black Research Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School. She received her A.B. from Harvard University, her J.D. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology from M.I.T.

Jennifer L. Mnookin, David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law, became dean of the UCLA School of Law in August 2015. A member of the UCLA Law faculty since 2005, she served as Vice Dean for Faculty and Research from 2007 to 2009, and Vice Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Intellectual Life in 2012-13.

As dean she has worked to build upon UCLA Law’s reputation for excellence and access, and to support a collaborative and engaged environment among students, the school’s renowned faculty and its 16,000 alumni. Initiatives she has spearheaded include the first alumnae leadership conference; new programs in human rights, criminal justice and immigration; and the expansion of clinical opportunities in areas ranging from veterans’ needs to documentary filmmaking.

A leading evidence scholar, Dean Mnookin is founder and faculty co-director of PULSE @ UCLA Law (the Program on Understanding Law, Science & Evidence). She is a co-author of two major evidence treatises, The New Wigmore, A Treatise on Evidence: Expert Evidence and Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony. She has published extensively on issues relating to forensic science, including latent fingerprint identification, handwriting expertise and DNA evidence, and has advocated for developing a “research culture” in these areas. Dean Mnookin is also known for her scholarship on expert evidence, evidence theory, the Confrontation Clause, and visual and photographic evidence.

Dean Mnookin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Science, Technology and Law. She co-chaired a group of senior advisors for a President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on use of forensic science in criminal courts, and is on the advisory board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. Dean Mnookin serves on the steering committee of the Association of American Law Schools’ Deans Forum. She was elected to the American Law Institute in 2011.

Prior to joining UCLA Law, Dean Mnookin was professor of law and Barron F. Black Research Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School. She received her A.B. from Harvard University, her J.D. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology from M.I.T.

A leading evidence scholar, Dean Mnookin is founder and faculty co-director of PULSE @ UCLA Law (the Program on Understanding Law, Science & Evidence). She is a co-author of two major evidence treatises, The New Wigmore, A Treatise on Evidence: Expert Evidence and Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony. She has published extensively on issues relating to forensic science, including latent fingerprint identification, handwriting expertise and DNA evidence, and has advocated for developing a “research culture” in these areas. Dean Mnookin is also known for her scholarship on expert evidence, evidence theory, the Confrontation Clause, and visual and photographic evidence.

Dean Mnookin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Science, Technology and Law. She co-chaired a group of senior advisors for a President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on use of forensic science in criminal courts, and is on the advisory board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. Dean Mnookin serves on the steering committee of the Association of American Law Schools’ Deans Forum. She was elected to the American Law Institute in 2011.

Prior to joining UCLA Law, Dean Mnookin was professor of law and Barron F. Black Research Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School. She received her A.B. from Harvard University, her J.D. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology from M.I.T.

A leading evidence scholar, Dean Mnookin is founder and faculty co-director of PULSE @ UCLA Law (the Program on Understanding Law, Science & Evidence). She is a co-author of two major evidence treatises, The New Wigmore, A Treatise on Evidence: Expert Evidence and Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony. She has published extensively on issues relating to forensic science, including latent fingerprint identification, handwriting expertise and DNA evidence, and has advocated for developing a “research culture” in these areas. Dean Mnookin is also known for her scholarship on expert evidence, evidence theory, the Confrontation Clause, and visual and photographic evidence.

Dean Mnookin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Science, Technology and Law. She co-chaired a group of senior advisors for a President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on use of forensic science in criminal courts, and is on the advisory board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. Dean Mnookin serves on the steering committee of the Association of American Law Schools’ Deans Forum. She was elected to the American Law Institute in 2011.

Prior to joining UCLA Law, Dean Mnookin was professor of law and Barron F. Black Research Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, and visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School. She received her A.B. from Harvard University, her J.D. from Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology from M.I.T.

Professor Lillquist received his B.S. in Biology and B.A. in History from Stanford University in 1989, and his J.D. from the University of Virginia in 1995. At Virginia, he was elected to the Order of the Coif and was the Editor-in-Chief of the Virginia Law Review. He then clerked for the Honorable John M. Walker, Jr. of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and afterward, joined the firm of Lankler, Siffert & Wohl, where he specialized in criminal defense and civil litigation. Professor Lillquist has been very active in efforts to improve the operation of the criminal justice system, writing extensively on the topic before his extensive administrative responsibilities intervened, in a series of article including Recasting Reasonable Doubt: The Virtues of Variability, 36 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 85 (2002); A Comment on the Admissibility of Forensic Evidence, 33 Seton Hall L. Rev. 1189 (2003);  The Puzzling Return of Jury Sentencing: Misgivings About Apprendi, 82 N.C.L. Rev. 621 (2004); False Positives and False Negatives in Capital Cases, 80 Ind. L. J. 49 (2005); Absolute Certainty and the Death Penalty, 42 Am. Crim. L. Rev. 45 (2005); Improving Accuracy in Criminal Cases, 41 U. Rich. L. Rev. 897 (2007) Balancing Errors in the Criminal Justice System, 41 Tex. Tech. L. Rev. 175 (2008); and A Right to Voice? 40 Seton Hall L. Rev. 1621 (2010)

Roger Koppl, Professor of Finance, Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University

 

Roger Koppl is Professor of Finance in the Whitman School of Management of Syracuse University and a faculty fellow in the University’s Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute. Koppl has served on the faculty of the Copenhagen Business School, Auburn University, Fairleigh Dickinson University, and Auburn University at Montgomery. He has held visiting positions with New York University, George Mason University, University of Vassa, and the Max Planck Institute of Economics. Professor Koppl is a past president of the Society for the Development of Austrian Economics and a former editor of Advances in Austrian Economics. 

Koppl’s research interests include the economic theory of experts, complexity theory, and the production and distribution of knowledge in society. His work on forensic science reform has been featured in Forbes magazine, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Reason magazine, Slate, and The Huffington Post and other outlets. 

Koppl's Erdös number is 3.

Paul G. Cassell, Ronald N. Boyce Presidential Professor of Criminal Law and University Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law

 

Professor Cassell received a B.A. (1981) and a J.D. (1984) from Stanford University, where he graduated Order of the Coif and was President of the Stanford Law Review. He clerked for then-Judge Antonin Scalia when Scalia was on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (1984-85) and then for the Chief Justice of the United States, Warren Burger (1985-86). Cassell then served as an Associate Deputy Attorney General with the U.S. Justice Department (1986-88) and as an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia (1988 to 1991). Cassell joined the faculty at the College of Law in 1992, where he taught full time until he was sworn in as a U.S. District Court Judge for the District of Utah on July 2, 2002. In November 2007, he resigned his judgeship to return full time to the College of Law, to teach, write, and litigate on issues relating to crime victims' rights and criminal justice reform.

Professor Cassell teaches criminal procedure, crime victims' rights, criminal law, and related classes.  He has also published numerous law review articles on criminal justice issues in journals such as the Stanford Law Review, the Michigan Law Review, the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.

Professor Cassell has argued cases relating to crime victims' rights before the United States Supreme Court, the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 10th, and D.C. Circuits, the Utah Supreme Court, and various other courts around the country. 

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/crimprof_blog/2017/10/symposium-on-experts-inference-and-innocence.html

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