CrimProf Blog

Editor: Kevin Cole
Univ. of San Diego School of Law

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Saturday, October 15, 2011

Logan on "Mosaic Theory" and Megan's Laws

Logan wayneWayne A. Logan (Florida State University - College of Law) has posted ‘Mosaic Theory’ and Megan’s Laws (Cardozo Law Review de novo, p. 95, 2011) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

This essay urges reexamination of the privacy implications of registration and community notification (RCN) laws, commonly known as Megan’s Laws. Applying the analytic construct recently employed by the D.C. Circuit in United States v. Maynard to conclude that extended use of a GPS tracking device constitutes a search for Fourth Amendment purposes, the essay argues that the collection and aggregation of registrant data entailed in RCN implicates a protectable Fourteenth Amendment privacy interest. In both contexts, the government collects nominally public data – in Maynard, car travel, with RCN, registrants’ home/work/school addresses, physical traits, etc. – and creates an informational “mosaic” of personal life that would not otherwise practically exist.

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October 15, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Serota on Stare Decisis and the Mandated Disclosure of Exculpatory Evidence under Brady v. Maryland

Michael Serota has posted Stare Decisis and the Brady Doctrine (Harvard Law & Policy Review, Vol. 6, p. 415, 2011) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

An array of federal district court judges frustrated with the limited scope of the Supreme Court’s approach to constitutionally mandated disclosure - otherwise known as the Brady doctrine - has reinterpreted it so as to eliminate the materiality requirement in the pretrial context. After witnessing the prosecutorial abuse and chronic underdisclosure that Brady’s materiality requirement invites, as well as observing the failure of discovery reformers to remedy the doctrine’s shortcomings through other channels, these judges have provided a judicial solution by ignoring Supreme Court precedent in order to avoid the limitation on the government’s disclosure obligation that the materiality requirement creates. This practice amounts to nothing less than an abrogation of stare decisis based on the view that policy concerns necessitate this much-needed reform of the criminal discovery system. The question that remains - and that I explore in this Essay - is whether the instrumentalism underlying their decisions is acceptable, or even desirable, in light of the constitutional and normative foundations upon which stare decisis rests.

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October 15, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 14, 2011

"Could PTSD Be a Defense in Seal Beach Shooting?"

From FindLaw:

New information about Seal Beach shooting suspect Scott Dekraai has some wondering whether he will get off scot-free.

Court records indicate that Dekraai has suffered from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder since 2007. Medical documentation also suggests that contact with his ex-wife is incredibly stressful and unhealthy.

October 14, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

"U.S. Bishop Is Charged With Failing to Report Abuse"

From the New York Times:

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A bishop in the Roman Catholic Church has been indicted for failure to report suspected child abuse, the first time in the 25-year history of the church’s sex abuse scandals that the leader of an American diocese has been held criminally liable for the behavior of a priest he supervised.

The indictment of the bishop, Robert W. Finn, and the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph by a county grand jury was announced Friday. Each was charged with one misdemeanor count involving a priest accused of taking pornographic photographs of girls as recently as this year. They pleaded not guilty.

The case caused an uproar among Catholics in Kansas City this year when Bishop Finn acknowledged that he knew of the photographs last December but did not turn them over to the police until May. During that time, the priest, the Rev. Shawn Ratigan, allegedly continued to attend church events with children, and took lewd photographs of another young girl.

October 14, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Cassidy & Massing on Renunciation as a Defense to Criminal Conspiracy

Cassidy, R. Michael - Boston College LawMichael Cassidy (Boston College Law School, pictured) and Gregory Massing have posted The Model Penal Code’s Wrong Turn: Renunciation as a Defense to Criminal Conspiracy (Florida Law Review, April, 2012) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

While the Model Penal Code was certainly one the most influential developments in criminal law in the past century, the American Law Institute (ALI) took a seriously wrong turn by recognizing a defense of “renunciation” to the crime of conspiracy. Under the Model Penal Code formulation, a member of a conspiracy who later disavows the agreement and thwarts its objective (for example, by notifying authorities of the planned crime in order to prevent its completion) is afforded a complete defense to conspiracy liability. This defense has enormous implications for crimes involving national security and terrorism, which are typically planned covertly and involve extensive coordination among multiple actors.

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October 14, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Davis & Leo on Determinations of Voluntariness for Admissibility of Confessions

Leo, Richard A. - University of San Francisco SoLDeborah Davis (University of Nevada, Reno) and Richard A. Leo (University of San Francisco - School of Law, pictured) have posted 'Interrogation-Related Regulatory Decline:' Ego-Depletion, Failures of Self-Regulation and the Decision to Confess (Univ. of San Francisco Law Research Paper No. 2011-24) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

As reflected in rulings ranging from Trial Courts to the U.S. Supreme Court, our judiciary commonly views as “voluntary,” and admits into evidence, interrogation-induced confessions obtained under conditions entailing stressors sufficient to severely compromise or eliminate the rational decision making capacities and self-regulation abilities necessary to justify such a view. Such decisions reflect, and sometimes explicitly state, assumptions soundly contradicted by science regarding the capacity of normal suspects lacking mental defect to withstand such stressors as severe fatigue, sleep deprivation, emotional distress – and aversive interrogation length, tactics and circumstances – and nevertheless resist the powerful pressures of the interrogation to self-incriminate. Notwithstanding excessive length and other severe interrogation-related stressors and tactics demonstrably associated with elicitation of false confessions, judges overwhelmingly admit confessions into evidence and juries overwhelmingly convict. In this review, we introduce the concept of “interrogation-related regulatory decline” (IRRD) – or decline in the self-regulation abilities necessary to resist the forces of influence inherent to interrogation.

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October 14, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 13, 2011

"Would-Be Plane Bomber Pleads Guilty, Ending Trial"

From the New York Times:

DETROIT — The trial of a man accused of trying to blow up a commercial airliner with a bomb sewed into his underwear ended Wednesday, just a day after it had begun, when Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, the accused, abruptly announced that he would plead guilty to all of the federal counts against him.

Prosecutors and federal agents seemed stunned, if pleased, and declared that the plea was evidence that the American court system, as opposed to a military tribunal, could bring a suitable outcome to a terrorism case. Anthony Chambers, a legal adviser assigned to Mr. Abdulmutallab, who was representing himself in court, said that he was disappointed with Mr. Abdulmutallab’s last-moment decision, but that it was entirely his choice.

. . .

After telling Judge Nancy G. Edmunds that he was indeed pleading guilty to each count against him, Mr. Abdulmutallab read a statement that he had written saying that his behavior may have violated American law but that it was in keeping with Muslim law, and that his efforts to harm Americans were retribution for American acts around the world.

October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

"Oral Argument in Florence v. Board of Chosen Freeholders of the County of Burlington"

Thoughts from Orin Kerr at The Volokh Conspiracy on the strip-search case:

My sense of the argument was that the Justices were pretty skeptical of engaging in the kind of line-drawing that the Petitioner advocated. It was just too hard to distinguish a 10-foot inspection from a 5-foot inspection from a 2-foot inspection, or to distinguish a major crime from a minor one. So I would guess the votes will be there for a conclusion that no line-drawing as required, as the government has the discretion to do a close visual inspection of all arrestees when they enter jail.

October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Smith on Constitutional Innocence Protection in Pre-trial, Trial, and Post-Conviction Procedures

Robert J. Smith (DePaul University College of Law) has posted Recalibrating Constitutional Innocence Protection (Washington Law Review, Forthcoming) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

The remainder of the article is divided into three parts. Part One explores innocence protection as an animating value of constitutional criminal procedure (Section A) and describes how developments in the way that crimes are investigated, proved and re-examined have dislodged the trial from its place at the center of the constitutional criminal procedure universe (Section B). Part Two explores how re-aligning the importance of innocence-protection with the practical realities of our criminal justice system would impact the regulation of post-conviction procedures. It also is divided into two sections. Section A provides an overview of how the Court has treated innocence claims to date. It considers gateway innocence claims (those in which the prisoner asserts that new evidence of his factual innocence should permit substantive review of an otherwise defaulted claim that he received a constitutionally deficient trial) and freestanding innocence claims (in which a prisoner asserts that new evidence of his factual innocence warrants relief despite the fact that the conviction stemmed from a constitutionally sound trial). Section B articulates a three-tiered framework (conviction relief, execution relief, gateway innocence) for adjudicating such claims. Part III offers concluding thoughts, including a preliminary consideration of the ramifications the decline of the trial as the center of gravity for innocence protection has on the regulation of pretrial procedures. 

October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Biggest insider trading sentence ever

From the New York Times, which also discusses more generally the increase in white-collar sentences in recent years:

The fallen hedge fund billionaire Raj Rajaratnam received the longest prison sentence ever for insider trading on Thursday, a watershed moment in the government’s aggressive two-year campaign to root out the illegal exchange of confidential information on Wall Street.

Judge Richard J. Holwell sentenced Mr. Rajaratnam, the former head of the Galleon Group hedge fund, to 11 years in prison and fined him $10 million and ordered him to forfeit $53.8 million. A jury convicted Mr. Rajaratnam of securities fraud and conspiracy in May after a two-month trial.

October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Markel on Retributive Justice and the Demands of Democratic Citizenship

Markel, Dan - Florida State University CoL Dan Markel (Florida State University College of Law) has posted Retributive Justice and the Demands of Democratic Citizenship (Virginia Journal of Criminal Law, Vol. 1, 2012) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

This article reveals and responds to the democracy deficit in certain retributivist approaches to criminal law. Democracy deficits arise when we insufficiently recognize the moral authority of liberal democracies to create new moral obligations for us as individuals. Specifically, I will argue, in contrast to the claims of some leading criminal law theorists, that conduct can be legitimately and justly criminalized even if the conduct is not morally wrongful prior to or independent of law. In other words, once we understand the basis for our presumptive political obligations within liberal democracies, a more capacious approach to establishing criminal laws can be tolerated from a political retributivist perspective.

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October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Hall on U.S. Passport Revocation for Convicted Sex Offenders

Hall, John Alexander - Chapman University SoLJohn Alexander Hall (Chapman University - School of Law) has posted Sex Offenders and Child Sex Tourism: The Case for Passport Revocation (Virginia Journal of Social Policy and the Law, Vol. 18, No. 2, Winter 2011) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

This paper addresses the problem that, under current law, convicted American sex offenders can obtain passports and travel overseas to abuse children sexually. American citizens participate actively in the child sex tourism industry and are estimated to represent a quarter of sex tourists in some destination countries. Many of those citizens have already been convicted and served prison terms for such crimes as child molestation, violent sexual assault, and the sexual abuse of children. Though subject to significant post-incarceration controls within the United States, they are able to obtain a passport and travel to poor countries where they abuse children with no real likelihood of being arrested.

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October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

ABA project for criminal procedure students

The ABA Criminal Justice Section has created "The Citizens Amicus Project" that seeks to get criminal procedures students to contribute to public discussion of the Fourth Amendment. This year's project focuses on warrantless GPS tracking. Further information is available here and after the jump.

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October 13, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Argument transcript in immigration/criminal conviction case

The transcript in Judulang v. Holder is here.

October 12, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Eppich on Issues of Place and Race in the use of "Knock and Talk" Policing

Andrew Eppich has posted Wolf at the Door: Issues of Place and Race in the Use of the 'Knock and Talk' Policing Technique (Boston College Third World Law Journal, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2012) on SSRN. Here is the abstract: 

The procedure known as 'knock and talk‛ allows police to approach a dwelling, knock on the door, and ask questions of the inhabitant inside, with the ultimate goal of entry into the dwelling. This is a popular policing technique because neither probable cause nor a warrant is required. This Note will analyze the effect of knock and talk on conceptions of privacy and space of low income and minority individuals to which this technique is often targeted.

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October 12, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Argument transcript in strip-search case

The transcript in Florence v. Board of Chosen Freeholders of County of Burlington is here.

October 12, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

War on drugs assists war on terror

To paraphrase Hillary Clinton's reaction, you couldn't make this stuff up. From the New York Times article, this interesting excerpt on how the alleged murder plot came to light:

The case began in May, when a Drug Enforcement Administration informant with ties to high-level leaders of Los Zetas told agents of a bizarre conversation. He had been approached, he said, by an Iranian friend of his aunt’s in Corpus Christi — Mr. Arbabsiar — with a proposition to hire the cartel to carry out terrorist attacks inside the United States. Mr. Arbabsiar believed that the informant was an actual member of Los Zetas.

Over the next two months, Mr. Arbabsiar and the informant worked out a deal under which Mr. Arbabsiar would pay $1.5 million to Los Zetas to kill the Saudi ambassador at a restaurant in Washington, officials said. 

The complaint quotes Mr. Arbabsiar as making conflicting statements about the possibility of bystander deaths; at one point he is said to say that killing the ambassador alone would be preferable, but on another occasion he said it would be “no big deal” if many others at the restaurant — possibly including United States senators — died in any bombing.

October 12, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Epstein on Requiring Presentation of Mitigation Evidence in Death Sentence Cases

Epstein, Jules - Widener University SoLJules Epstein (Widener University - School of Law) has posted Mandatory Mitigation: An Eighth Amendment Mandate to Require Presentation of Mitigation Evidence, Even When the Sentencing Trial Defendant Wishes to Die (Temple Political & Civil Rights Law Review, Forthcoming, Widener Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 11-31) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

The Eighth Amendment’s mandate in death penalty proceedings is to “ensure that only the most deserving of execution are put to death[.]” This Article continues development of a thesis of this author, presented in an earlier piece, that it is cruel and unusual punishment to execute those who are not “most deserving,” and that the determination of this must include consideration of mitigation evidence. From this conclusion flows a second one, the focus of this Article - because the Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment is a limitation on society’s power, an individual may not consent and submit himself to a punishment that society itself is banned from imposing.

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October 12, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Werden, Hammond & Barnett on Cartel Enforcement in the United States

Gregory J. WerdenScott D. Hammond, and Belinda A. Barnett (U.S. Department of Justice - Antitrust Division) have posted Recidivism Eliminated: Cartel Enforcement in the United States Since 1999 on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

John Connor has asserted that recidivism by cartel participants is very common and is symptomatic of serious flaws in cartel enforcement. However, we searched U.S. enforcement records for instances of cartel recidivism and found none at all since July 1999 when the first non-U.S. national was sentenced to a term of imprisonment for participation in international cartel activity. All available evidence indicates U.S. cartel enforcement in the United States is at least achieving the specific deterrence of convicted offenders.

October 11, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Argument transcript in habeas case on "clearly established" law

Today's transcript from Greene v. Fisher is here.

October 11, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)