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Thursday, November 27, 2014

Thanksgiving Feast: Meredith Miller Top Ten List

MeredithThis is a rather unconventional list.  I have just gone back into our archives and picked out one my favorite Meredith posts from each of the ten years since she started blogging here.  It's amazing how well I remember each of these posts!

Meredith Vintage 2014: John Oliver and Sarah Silverman Tackle Payday Loans

Meredith Vintage 2013: Breaking: Bieber Requires NDA of Guests in His Home

Meredith Vintage 2012: Markets on the Mekong

Meredith Vintage 2011: Don't Buy This: 'Tis the Cyber Season of Reverse Psychology

Meredith Vintage 2010: A Hairy Breach of Contract Suit against Paris Hilton 

Meredith Vintage 2009: Can Mad Men Bring Sexy Back to Contracts?

Meredeith Vintage 2008: Brown on Halloween, Promises & Signed Documents

Meredith Vintage 2007: Law Prof Takes on Cell Phone Company

Meredith Vintage 2006: British Court Must Watch Jerry Springer Show

Meredith Vintage 2005: The Commonality of Computers, French Fries and Arbitration

It was hard to make these choices.  Lots of competition in the Meredith archives!

 

November 27, 2014 in About this Blog, Celebrity Contracts, Television, Travel | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Styl'n at the International Commercial Arbitration Moot

 

Joe_cocker_1970

In a couple of previous posts I've described the International Commerical Arbitration Moot (ICAM) and detailed some aspects of  this year's problem. None of this is news  to the contracts, sales, and arbitration professors around the country who are involved in this activity. Still I am surprised at how many schools do not have teams. I have also noted the possible use of the yearly ICAM problem as a source or inspiration of exam questions. 

For professors who are interested in starting a team there are many things to consider other than substance. These involve selecting and preparing a team.  Here at Florida this means trimming a class of 30 or so  hopeful students down to a team of 4 to 6.  It is a complicated task. We try as much as possible to hold try outs that resemble the actual competition in Vienna.  Other coaches know that the ICAM competition requires students to know the facts and law with precision and to have certain mannerisms that the mainly European judges find appealing.  For example, speaking slowly is critical since many if not most judges will have English as a second language. Also, the closer the English spoken is to British English, the better. Why? Most of the arbitrators will have learned English abroad. The use of virtually any slang means you should move up your departure date from Vienna because you will not go far in the competition.  "Gonna" must be "going to." "Wanna" must be "want to." No "big bucks." No "you guys." etc.  If there such a thing as an eloquent yet casual style, that seems to work best. Yes, theater is involved and the coaches are directors as much as teachers. Even "costumes" seem to count. I watched a rather uncomfortable session in which an arbitrator dressed down a competitor who had, well,  "dressed down"  by not having the top button of his shirt buttoned. I think most coaches would agree the competition starts when the students arrive at the U.S. departure airport because from that point forward they may be rubbing shoulders with the arbitrators they will encounter in Vienna. 

 

November 20, 2014 in Contract Profs, Film, Miscellaneous, Television, Travel | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Aereo Loses in Supreme Court and so do Consumers – for Now

By Myanna Dellinger

Recently, I blogged here on Aereo’s attempt to provide inexpensive TV programming to consumers by capturing and rebroadcasting cable TV operators’ products without paying the large fees charged by those operators.  The technology is complex, but at bottom, Aereo argued that they were not breaking copyright laws because they merely enabled consumers to capture TV that was available over airwaves and via cloud technology anyway. 

In the recent narrow 6-3 Supreme Court ruling, the Courts said that Aereo was “substantially similar” to a cable TV company since it sold a service that enabled subscribers to watch copyrighted TV programs shortly after they were broadcast by the cable companies.  The Court found that “Aereo performs petitioners’ works publicly,” which violates the Copyright Act.  The fact that Aereo uses slightly different technology than the cable companies does not make a “critical difference,” said the Court.  Since the ruling, Aereo has suspended its operations and posted a message on its website that calls the Court’s outcome "a massive setback to consumers."

Whether or not the Supreme Court is legally right in this case is debatable, but it at least seems to be behind the technological curve.  Of course the cable TV companies resisted Aereo’s services just as IBM did not predict the need for very many personal computers, Kodak failed to adjust quickly enough to the digital camera craze, music companies initially resisted digital files and online streaming of songs.  But if companies want to survive in these technologically advanced times, it clearly does not make sense to resist technological changes.  They should embrace not only technology, but also, in a free market, competition so long as, of course, no laws are violated.  We also do not use typewriters anymore simply to protect the status quo of the companies that made them.

It is remarkable how much cable companies attempt to resist the fact that many, if not most, of us simply do not have time to watch hundreds of TV stations and thus should not have to buy huge, expensive package solutions.  Not one of the traditional cable TV companies seem to consider the business advantage of offering more individualized solutions, which is technologically possible today.  Instead, they are willing to waste money and time on resisting change all the way to the Supreme Court, not realizing that the change is coming whether or not they want it. 

Surely an innovative company will soon be able to work its way around traditional cable companies’ strong position on this market while at the same time observing the Supreme Court’s markedly narrow holding.  Some have already started doing so.  Aereo itself promises that it is only “paus[ing] our operations temporarily as we consult with the court and map out our next steps.”

 

 

July 9, 2014 in Commentary, Current Affairs, E-commerce, Famous Cases, Film, In the News, Music, Recent Cases, Television, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

CNN's Crossfire Almost Takes a Position on Sex Contracts on College Campuses

Friend of the blog, Kenneth Ching, shared this with us.

So I hadn't really thought about Crossfire since Jon Stewart shut them down.  It was the pinnacle of Stewart's career thus far.

 

But I guess it's just hard to keep a terrible idea down when you have 24 hours of time to kill every day.  

I don't know what CNN's little segment on sex contracts is supposed to accomplish.  I guess it is intended to introduce its audience to one of its contributors, S. E. Cupp   No doubt, Ms. Cupp has lots of interesting ideas and is telegenic and all that, but this segment reads like a Ms. America question gone wrong. "Ms. Louisiana, do you think colleges and universities ought to require written assent from both (or all) parties to any sexual act in which a student participates?"

Ms. Cupp starts, because her brand is "smart conservative," by lashing out at a culture that "disarms" students on college campuses.  Her claim is that women can't protect themselves with pepper spray because of weapons bans on campuses.  Of course, most of those bans do not include defensive weapons and anyway, if a woman used her pepper spary defensively in defiance of such a ban, she would 1) escape an assault and 2) perhaps face reprimand.  It's not clear that the disarmament has occurred, nor does Ms. Cupp address the very real possibility that women are safer when men can't carry weapons on campus, but I digress.

Then she seems to complain about resources going to crisis centers and hotlines rather than to rape prevention but she is careful to say that crisis centers and hotlines are a good thing (way to give a  balanced perspective, Ms. Louisiana!).  Then comes the segue to the University of California's consideration of sex contracts.   This is not news.  Antioch College did it for years.  Even we  blogged about the subject two years ago.

What's Cupp's take?  The idea is silly, but good for California for at least trying!  Alright audience.  Ms. Louisiana!  Isn't she a great sport?

Cupp actually makes me feel nostalgic for the days when Camille Paglia would not just strike provocative intellectual poses but would actually take provocative intellectual positions on the right.  I didn't agree with Paglia, but she expressed her original and outlandish ideas with verve and panache.  She challenged her readers to consider their positions and think things anew.  If anyone actually watches the new Crossfire, let me know if you see any signs of an ability to do so over there.

 

July 9, 2014 in Commentary, Television, True Contracts | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 23, 2014

Fargo: A TV Series About an Implied Contract

Martin_FreemanThe event that fuels the first-season plot of the new F/X television series Fargo is a conversation in an emergency room waiting room.  Lester Nygaard (Martin Freeman, left) has just been assaulted by Sam Hess, who used to bully him mercilessly in high school.  Hess intimidates and humiliates Lester in front of Hess's comically neanderthal sons.  Although Hess never actually hits Lester, the result is still a broken nose.  

While waiting for someone to attend to his injury, Lester has a conversation with Lorne Malvo (Billy Bob Thornton, Right), who was injured when his car hit a deer and careened off the highway.  Once the car came to rest in a snow-covered field, a man wearing only boxer shorts, who for some reason had been in the trunk of Malvo's car, jumped out and ran for the cover of the nearby woods.  That's pretty much all we know about Malvo when he and Lester have their conversation.

BillyBobThorntonMalvo manages to learn from Lester what had happened to him and that the man responsible for his injuries is named Hess.  Malvo suggests that Lester ought to kill Hess, but Lester is not that kind of person (or at least not yet), so he dismisses the idea.  Malvo offers to kill Hess for Lester.  Lester just gives him that look of incredulity that has been a staple of Martin Freeman's wonderful career.  Malvo insists that Lester say either yes or no, but  a nurse interrupts the conversation to take Lester in for treatment, and Lester says nothing.

Spoiler alert: you may not want to read below the jump if you have not watched the show (and intend to do so) as a few plot details are revealed:

Continue reading

May 23, 2014 in Commentary, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, May 18, 2014

More on the Structure of Cable Contracts

By Myanna Dellinger

Recently, Jeremy Telman blogged here about the insanity of having to pay for hundreds of TV stations when one really only wants to, or has time to, watch a few. 

Luckily, change may finally be on its way.  The company Aereo is offering about 30 channels of network programming on, so far, computers or mobile devices using cloud technology.  The price?  About $10 a month, surely a dream for “cable cutters” in the areas which Aereo currently serves. 

How does this work?  Each customer gets their own tiny Aereo antenna instead of having to either have a large, unsightly antenna on their roofs or buying expensive cable services just to get broadcast stations.  In other words, Aereo enables its subscribers to watch broadcast TV on modern, mobile devices at low cost and with relative technological ease.  In other words, Aereo records show for its subscribers so that they don’t have to. 

That sounds great, right?  Not if you are the big broadcast companies in fear of losing millions or billions of dollars (from the revenue they get via cable companies that carry their shows).  They claim that this is a loophole in the law that allows private users to record shows for their own private use, but not for companies to do so for commercial gain and copyright infringement.

Of course, the great American tradition of filing suit was followed.  Most judges have sided with Aero so far, the networks have filed petition for review with the United States Supreme Court, which granted the petition in January.

Stay tuned for the outcome in this case…

May 18, 2014 in About this Blog, Commentary, Current Affairs, E-commerce, Famous Cases, In the News, Recent Cases, Television, True Contracts, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 15, 2014

The Structure of Cable Contracts

Today's New York Times features an article reporting on a 2012 study that indicates that consumers are better off being forced to buy bundled packages than they would be if they could choose to purchase only the cable channels they actually view.  The argument seems to boil down to the fact that it costs the cable companies about the same to bring you four channels as it does for them to bring you 179 channels, so they are going to find a way to charge you the same regardless, and now you will miss out on watching channels that you only watch occasionally.  Moreoever, the channels that are most in demand on a per-channel basis will now demand higher fees to make up for lost revenues from their sister stations that fewer people watch and which consequently cannot generate as much advertising revenue as they could under the bundled system.  

Televisions
Given that this story is based on one two-year old study and comes from Times correspondent Josh Barro, who also gives the thumbs up to Frontier Airlines for charging people extra to use overhead storage bins, I'm going to file this story provisionally under, "Wait, that can't be right," and see if any counterarguments turn up.  The comments on the story indicate that some of the assumptions underlying the study and Barro's column could be questioned.

May 15, 2014 in In the News, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 7, 2014

No Contract! But There Is This Agreement

Cecelia HarperMy student, Cecelia Harper (pictured), recently ordered television service.  The representative for the service provider offered a 2-year agreement, which he said was “absolutely, positively not a contract.”  Learned in the law as she is, Cecelia asked the representative what he thought the difference was between a contract and an agreement.  He wasn't sure, but he did read her what he called "literature," which surprisingly enough was not a Graham Greene novel but the terms and conditions of the agreement, which included a $20/month "deactivation" fee should Cecelia terminate service before the end of the contract -- oops, I mean agreement -- term.  

I have seen said agreement, and it includes the following charming terms:

  • Service provider reserves the right to make programming and pricing changes;
  • Customer is entitled to notice of changes and is free to cancel her service if she does not like the changes, but then she will incur the deactivation fee;
  • Customer must agree in advance to 12 categories of administrative fees that may be imposed on her;
  • Service provider reserves right to change the terms of the agreement at any time, and continued use of the service after notice constitutes acceptance of new terms;
  • An arbitration clause that excludes certain actions that the service provider might bring; and 
  • A class action waiver

If the agreement had a $20/month deactivation fee in it, I could not find it.  All I see is a deactivation fee of "up to $15."  Rather, the "customer agreement" references a separate "programming agreement," and suggests that there are cancellation fees associated with termination prior to the term of the programming agreement.

So in what sense is this not a contract?  My guess is that this is service providers trying to emulate what cell phone service providers have done with their "no contract phone" campaigns.  For example, there's this one:

 

I'm guessing that the television service providers have learned that these ad campaigns have made "contract" into a dirty word.  They are now seeking to seduce new customers by insisting that they do not offer contracts.  Oren Bar-Gill will have to write a sequel to his last book and call it Seduction by Agreement.

If anyone has any other theories for why representatives for service providers are insisting that their contracts are really agreements, please share!

April 7, 2014 in Commentary, Television, True Contracts | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 14, 2014

Thank You For Your Patience

We at the ContractsProf appreciate your readership.  Unfortunately, all of our bloggers are occupied at this time binging on Season 2 of House of Cards.  Readers may stare at their screens, visit the TaxProf Blog or any other blog on the Law Professor Blog Network, or pass Valentine's Day by doing whatever it takes to get a free crib from Ikea (hat tip to Rachel Arnow-Richman).

Test Pattern

We will resume blogging shortly.  

Thank you for your patience. 

February 14, 2014 in About this Blog, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, February 1, 2014

Hong Kong Tycoon Revokes His $65M Offer to Suitors of Lesbian Daughter

Running out of examples of unilateral contracts?  Well, here's one: Hong Kong tycoon Cecil Chao offered $65 million to any man that could get his lesbian daughter's hand in marriage.  That is, if a person could reasonably believe that Chao intended to enter into this bargain (it seems that he was in fact serious, especially in light of his wealth and his rejection of his daughter's sexuality):

Chao's daughter Gigi handled the situation with incredbile grace, writing an open letter to her father:

In her letter, Gigi Chao tells her father that she "will always forgive you for thinking the way you do, because I know you think you are acting in my best interests."

And she says she takes responsibility for some of her father's misplaced expectations.

When he first announced the colossal dowry in 2012, she said at the time she found it "quite entertaining."

But this week she appeared to set the record straight.

"I'm sorry to mislead you to think I was only in a lesbian relationship because there was a shortage of good, suitable men in Hong Kong," she writes. "There are plenty of good men, they are just not for me."

Here's Gigi in her own words:

It sounds like quite a few men responded to the offer with attempts to win Gigi's heart.  But it is now too late.  Even though Chao will not recognize his daughter's relationship with her long-time partner (really, wife - given that they wed in France even though the marriage is not recognized in Hong Kong), Chao has now revoked the offer.   

February 1, 2014 in In the News, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 27, 2014

Severe Economic Disruptions from Climate Change

Severe Economic Disruptions from Climate Change

For many, climate change remains a far off notion that will affect their grandchildren and other “future generations.”  Think again.  Expect your food prices to increase now, if they have not already.  Amidst the worst drought in California history, the United Nations is releasing a report that, according to a copy obtained by the New York Times, finds that the risk of severe economic disruptions is increasing because nations have so dragged their feet in combating climate change that the problem may be virtually impossible to solve with current technologies. 

The report also says that nations around the world are still spending far more money to subsidize fossil fuels than to accelerate the urgently needed shift to cleaner energy.  The United States is one of these.  Even if the internationally agreed-upon goal of limiting temperature increases to 2° C, vast ecological and economic damage will still occur.  One of the sectors most at risk: the food industry.  In California, a leading agricultural state, the prices of certain food items are already rising caused by the current drought.  In times of shrinking relative incomes for middle- and lower class households, this means a higher percentage of incomes going to basic necessities such as food, water and possible medical expenses caused by volatile weather and extreme heat waves.  In turn, this may mean less disposable income that could otherwise spur the economy. 

Disregarding climate change is technologically risky too: to meet the target of keeping concentrations of CO2 below the most recently agreed-upon threshold of 500 ppm, future generations would have to literally pull CO2 out of the air with machinery that does not yet exist and may never become technically or economically feasible or with other yet unknown methods.

Of course, it doesn’t help that a secretive network of conservative billionaires is pouring billions of dollars into a vast political effort attempting to deny climate change and that – perhaps as a consequence – the coverage of climate change by American media is down significantly from 2009, when media was happy to report a climate change “scandal” that eventually proved to be unfounded.

The good news is that for the first time ever, the United States now has an official Climate Change Action Plan.  This will force some industries to adopt modern technologies to help combat the problem nationally.  Internationally, a new climate change treaty is slated for 2015 to take effect from 2020.  Let us hope for broad participation and that 2020 is not too late to avoid the catastrophic and unforeseen economic and environmental effects that experts are predicting.

Myanna Dellinger

Assistant Professor of Law

Western State College of Law

 

January 27, 2014 in Current Affairs, Food and Drink, In the News, Legislation, Science, Television | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 23, 2013

Motion to Compel Arbitration Granted in Part, Denied in Part in Antitrust Case v. Cable Providers and Sports Organizations

HockeyOn November 25, 2013, Judge Scheindlin of the Southern District of New York issued an opinion in Laumann v. National Hockey League, granting in part and denying in part a motion to compel arbitration brought by defendant Comcast and denying in full a similar motion brought by defendant DIRECTV.  Plaintiffs claim that defendants, including the National Hockey League and Major League Baseball, along with the major cable and satellite television service providers entered into "agreements to eliminate competition in the distribution of [baseball and hockey] games over the Internet and television [by] divid[ing] the live-game video presentation market into exclusive territories, which are protected by anticompetitive blackouts," and by "collud[ing] to sell the `out-of-market' packages only through the League [which] exploit[s] [its] illegal monopoly by charging supra-competitive prices."  These agreements allegedly violate the Sherman Antiturst Act.

At the heart of plaintiffs' beef, it seems, is that if one wants to view "out-of-market" games -- that is, games that do not feature the team from one's home city or the city where one is located -- one must purchase television packages which inculde all out-of-market games, even if one is only interested in the games of one out-of-market team.

BaseballBoth Comcast and DIRECTV have customer service agreements that feature arbitration clauses and so both defedants moved to compel arbitration.  Judge Scheindlin granted Comcast's motion with respect to one plaintiff who purchased an out-of-market package directly from Comcast and thus was clearly bound by the arbitration provision.  The remaining plaintiffs had a more complicated relationship to Comcast and claimed that their claims did not arise directly under their customer service agreements with Comcast.

Judge Scheindlin first ruled that any colorable dispute about the scope or validity of the arbitration clause must be referred to the arbitrator.  Plaintiffs colorfully objected that where the relationship between the agreements and the claims are too attenuated, granting Comcast's motion would be like compelling arbitration of a claim by a plaintiff who had been hit by a Comcast bus.  Judge Scheindlin agreed with respect to one plaintiff, where "the sole nexus between his claims and his Comcast service is the allegation that his DIRECTV package contained material produced by the Comcast" Regional Sports Networks.

Comcast also sought to compel arbitration of claims brought against it pursuant to arbitration clauses in plaintiffs' agreements with DIRECTV.  With respect to these claims, Judge Scheindlin noted that there was no clear intent to have questions of arbitrability between a signatory and a non-signatory decided by the arbitrator.  She then ruled that the arbitration clause in the DIRECTV agreements did not encompass plaintiffs' claims against Comcast.  She also rejected Comcast's claim that plaintiffs should be estopped from bringing a claim under the DIRECTV agreements through any mechanism other than arbitration.

DIRECTV's motion to compel arbitration against another plaintiff failed because the plaintiff is not a DIRECTV customer bound by its arbitration agreement.  The DIRECTV subscription is in the name of plaintiff's wife, and the court rejected any claim that he could be bound by admission or estoppel.

[JT]

 

December 23, 2013 in Recent Cases, Sports, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 9, 2013

FIRM OFFERS or firm offers

Download

Like others writing or reading this blog, my students are currently toiling away on their final exam. This means the last several days have been filled with questions. Sometimes the questions are so good I think the questioner should be teaching the course and not me. On the other hand, sometimes the questions are so worrisome that I wonder whether or not I have actually been teaching anything at all. One of my favorite sources of questions is 2-205 of the Code. In the context of essay questions I have presented all manner of issues based on 2-205. Are initials sufficient as a signature? (The Comments say yes.) What constitutes an assurance? What is a reasonable time? When I enter "2-205" into westlaw I am surprised at how few cases seem to turn on a 2-205 question.

Most of us have probably asked a question based on something like this. "Please let me know whether you accept within 7 days." Is that an assurance? If not, it's not a firm offer. Or is it? Suppose it is "I will hold the offer open for you. Please led my know your answer within seven days." How long is the offer open? Seven days or even longer if that is reasonable? And what does reasonable depend on? Should the reasonable offeree [btw is there an official correct spelling of offeree?] really expect the offer to be available on day 10.

And there are the questions dealing with a firm offer that is rejected or when there is a counter offer. Does it matter if the offeree has relied on the rejection? After all, the firm offer is a very thin concept and mere limits the rationale for a revocation. Which raises the question what are the other rationales for revocation?

If we fall back to common law answers what we know, or seem to know, is that firm offers can be open for longer than the time stated, although they become "soft" after that time, and if rejected or met with a counteroffer, can end before the time stated.

On the other hand, if the drafters only meant to take the consideration requirement out of option contracts (which the Restatement almost does), are these answers right?

2-205 is like a box of choclates.

Jeff "Jake" Harrison

December 9, 2013 in Television | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Breaking Bad: It All Came Down to Contracts!

As we predicted, the finale of Breaking Bad turned crucially on Walt's contract with Uncle Jack pursuant to which Uncle Jack was to kill Jesse Pinkman.  

*******

SPOILER ALERT

IF YOU ARE NOT UP-TO-DATE ON BREAKING BAD EPISODES,

READ NO FURTHER

******

Continue reading

October 1, 2013 in Commentary, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Halftime Show: Is the wholesomeness of the NFL M.I.A?

NFL v. MIA: we've mentioned issues related to this incident on this blog in the past.  But, if you ask me, it just got good.

Here's the background: at the 2012 Superbowl, this little flip of the bird happened during the halftime show:

The NFL has since sued (in arbitration) M.I.A. (the bird-flipping artist in the video above) for $1.5 million.  The NFL’s claim?  It claims that M.I.A. breached her contract because the “offensive gesture” was “in flagrant disregard for the values that form the cornerstone of the NFL brand and the Super Bowl."  In the contract, she apparently acknowledged “the great value of the goodwill associated with the NFL and the tremendous public respect and reputation for wholesomeness enjoyed by the NFL."

The case, it sounds, comes down to what is “offensive” and what exactly are the “wholesome” values of the NFL.  This FoxSports column does a great job explaining why the lawsuit is “laughable” – with video footage as evidence of just how wholesome the NFL is.

A video of M.I.A. has recently surfaced.  In the video, she (rather articulately) explains the absurdity of the lawsuit.  As 411Mania.com describes:

[M.I.A.] says the NFL is "scapegoating me into trying to set the goalpost for what is offensive in America." She notes that the picture in which she is seen giving the middle finger also has a group of sixteen year-old girls who were selected from a high school in Indianapolis who are in cheerleader outfits with their "hips thrusted in the air, legs wide open, in this very sexual...sexually provocative position."

Here’s M.I.A. regarding the lawsuit, which she describes as  "a massive display of... powerful corporation dick shaking."  In light of the 16-year-old cheerleaders on stage behind her, she frames the issue in the lawsuit as whether female sexual exploitation or empowerment is more offensive.  Interesting stuff:

[Meredith R. Miller]

September 26, 2013 in Film Clips, In the News, Music, Sports, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Contracts Conundrum in Breaking Bad?

*******

SPOILER ALERT

IF YOU ARE NOT UP-TO-DATE ON BREAKING BAD EPISODES,

READ NO FURTHER

******

Continue reading

September 19, 2013 in Commentary, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 13, 2013

BBC Severance Pay: Kerfuffle or Fooferaw?

BBCBroadcastingHouseOver the summer, hte UK's National Audit Office presented to the BBC Trust Finance Committee this Report on executive severance payments made to fromer BBC executives.   The BBC has reduced its management staff signficantly since 2009.  In so doing, it expects savings totalling £92 million.  However, the BBC also has made severance payments to the 150 ousted executives totalling £25 million.  

According to the Report, the BBC plans changes going forward.  From now on severance pay will not exceed 12-months salary or £150,000, whichever is less.

The drama of Parliamentary hearings into the payments is well described here in the UK's The Guardian.  The BBC's Director General at the time of the payments was Mark Thompson, who recently moved on to The New York Times, where he is Chief Executive.  Thompson defended the payments before Parliament, although they exceeded by £1.4 million (£2 million in The Independent's account) the BBC's contractual obligations to its former executives.  The largest single payment was just over £1 million, and it went to Thompson's deputy, Mark Byford.  According to the BBC, the investigation into severance payments was triggered by a £450,000 payment to one BBC executive who resigned in connection with a scandal after just 54 days on the job.  

From an American perspective, it is a bit hard to see what the fuss is all about.  Sure, capping severance for executives at publicly-owned entities is certainly a reasonable policy, but even without the cap, exceeding contractual obligations by something less than 10% while achieving significant savings overall seems pretty tame on the overall scales of both wasteful public-sector spending and  executive severance packages.  As Brad Pitt's character puts it in Inglorious Bastards, that should just get you a chewing out.  But perhaps we have been desensitized by the size of severance packets, even at public corporations, on this side of the pond.  

Two footnotes:

1. It is perhaps telling that the Report begins with three blank pages (after the cover page) followed by two mostly blank pages.  Apparently they don't audit their own use of paper.

2. UK usage seems to have completely abandoned the hyphenated compound adjective.  Thus, after all the blank pages, the Report begins, "The BBC Trust receives value for money investigations into specific areas of BBC activity."  I had to read this sentence three times before I could make any sense of it.  That's because "value for money" is a compound adjective rather than two nouns separated by a preposition.  To my eyes, the sentence would have been far more readable if it had been written: "The BBC Trust receives value-for-money investigations into specific areas of BBC activity. "  Am I the only one?  My inquiry also relates to changes going on in Law Review offices in the US, as I have tussled with student editors who have grown hostile to hyphens in recent years.  I like the little fellas.  

[JT]

September 13, 2013 in Commentary, In the News, Television, True Contracts | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Addicted to Breaking Bad: Fan Sues Apple for Breach of Contract

According to Rolling Stone, Ohio resident Noam Lazebnik has sued Apple for breach of contract, claiming that "he and other Breaking Bad fans have been cheated by only receiving the first eight episodes of the show's final 16 episodes with their iTunes 'Season Pass.'"  Rolling Stone explains:

The AMC drama's fifth season has aired in a split format of two eight-episode mini-runs. Lazebnik says he and other customers were promised "every episode in that season," which should include the final eight episodes (since those are technically still part of Season Five). According to the lawsuit, Apple owes fans either $14.99 (for the standard version) or $22.99 (for the high-def version).

Lazebnik is basing the suit on "breach of contract and violation of California's consumer protection laws."

"When a consumer buys a ticket to a football game, he does not have to leave at halftime," reads the claim. "When a consumer buys an opera ticket, he does not get kicked out at intermission." Apple representatives contacted by GigaOM did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

[Meredith R. Miller]

September 10, 2013 in In the News, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 9, 2013

Contracts LibGuides

Jesse-Bowman2This year, my colleauges at the Valparaiso University Law School and I, with the help of our librarian, Jeese Bowman (pictured), are teaching with the aid of this LibGuide.  The LibGuide contains all of the cases that we will use in our courses, plus links to Restatement,  UCC and CISG sections, as well as tabs through which students can find links to excercises, past exams and model answers, study guides, blog posts and other information that might prove useful to our students.

The move to the LibGuide was motivated by a number of considerations.  First, we have all used different casebooks and find a great deal to praise and admire in all of them.  However, no single casebook can be perfect for each contracts professor's individual needs.  I have a roster of cases that I think work best for the material I want to convey to my students.  No single casebook includes all of the cases I want to use, and the casebook authors sometimes edit their cases slightly differently than how I would edit them.  My colleagues and I edited the cases posted on the LibGuide to suit our teaching needs, and if we differ, we can always put up multiple versions.  

Second, even if I could find the perfect casebook that had every single case I want to teach and all the relevant ancillary materials, I still could not justify the expense to my students.  Casebook prices are simply too high, since we can deliver the same materials through the LibGuides.  I should note that, because I ban laptops and other technology from my classroom, I do require that the students buy xeroxed copies of the edited cases.  That will run them $10 a piece for the first seven-week minimester.

Yup! That's not a typo!  We are teaching contracts in two, two-credit, seven-week "minimesters," a topic about which I will have a lot to say in future posts.  

The LibGuide is still a work in progress.  Each week, I send Jesse more materials to add to the LibGuide.  This is another advantage of the LibGuide over print course materials.  It is easily expanded; easily revised; easily updated.  

The final advantage of the LibGuide is (dare I say it?) . . . LibGuides are fun.  Ask any librarian!  And believe you me, librarians know how to have fun.  They are fun for the same reason that this blog is fun.  You can follow links that interest you, and they often take you to unexpected and illuminating places.  We hope that our LibGuide will grow and prosper and that it will provide a portal through which our students can wander cautiously, tentatively until [whoosh!] they fall down a rabbit hole and emerge in the Wonderland of contract law.

[JT]

 

August 9, 2013 in Commentary, Contract Profs, Law Schools, Television | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Jay the Intern, Brought to You By Contracts

On last night's Colbert Report, Stephen announced that he, a company man, was contractually obligated to provide a sponsor integration for Halls Mentho-Lyptus cough drops. He does so by changing the name of his intern Jay to "Halls Mentho-Lyptus with Triple-Soothing Action Presents Jay the Intern."

 

Ahh, the power of contracts.

[JT]

February 28, 2013 in Television, True Contracts | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)