ContractsProf Blog

Editor: D. A. Jeremy Telman
Valparaiso Univ. Law School

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

New in Print

Pile of BooksKyle R. Jefcoat, The Federal Circuit's 2014 Government Contract Decisions, 64 Am. U. L. Rev. 807 (2015)

Andrey V. Kuznetsov, The Limits of Contractual Stabilization Clauses for Protecting International Oil and Gas Investments Examined through the Prism of the Sakhalin-2 PSA: Mandatory Law, the Umbrella Clause, and the Fair and Equitable Treatment Standard, 22 Willamette J. Int'l L. & Disp. Resol. 223 (2015)

Benjamin Pomerance, Arbitration over Accountability? The State of Mandatory Arbitration Clauses in Nursing Home Admission Contracts, 16 Fla. Coastal L. Rev. 153 (2015) 

Rex J. Zedalis, A Promise to Pay Money if Transferred Land Is Used for Identified Energy-Related Activity: Can Successors of the Promisor Be Bound? 50 Tulsa L. Rev. 805 (2015) 

October 7, 2015 in Government Contracting, Recent Scholarship | Permalink

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

New in Print

Pile of BooksPaula Giliker, The Influence of EU and European Human Rights Law on English Private Law, 64 Int'l & Comp. L.Q. 237 (2015)

Shelby D. Green, A Tale of Two Privities: Conflict among the Circuits on the Role of Privity of Contract and Privity of Estate in the FDIC's Assignment of Failed Bank Leases, 49 Real Prop. Tr. & Est. L.J. 301 (2014)

Ken M. Kanzawa, Legal and Practical Issues in Implementing Executive Order 13673: Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces, 44 Pub. Cont. L.J. 417 (2015)

Gregor Matvos, Renegotiation Design: Evidence from National Football League Roster Bonuses, 57 J.L. & Econ. 387 (2014)

Daniel E., Schoeni, Maj., U.S. Air Force, Second-Best Markets: On the Hidden Efficiency of Defense Offsets, 44 Pub. Cont. L.J. 369 (2015)

September 30, 2015 in Government Contracting, Recent Scholarship | Permalink

Monday, September 7, 2015

New in Print

Friday, August 28, 2015

Weekly News Roundup

Justin_BieberIn breaking Bieber news, HuffPo reports that Justin Bieber (pictured, left) claimed breach of contract in canceling a scheduled appearance in Montreal.  The venue where Bieber was scheduled to perform seems to belieber the young artist, as it posted on its Facebook page a notice that neither it nor Mr. Bieber were liable for the cancellation.  Bieber himself tweeted the cancellation, specifically referring to the promoter's breach (and to lying, but we prefer the legal jargon).

In Presidential candidate news, the Wisconsin Gazette reported that Wisconsin GovernorScottWalkertaxpayers might have to pay $50 million in damages because Governor Scott Walker (pictured, right) breached a contract that his predecessor had entered into to modernize the states rail service.  According to the Gazette, Spanish train-maker Talgo sued the state for $66 million.  The case settled, with the state agreement to pay nearly $10 million on top of the $42 million it had already paid for trains that it never received. 

The Washington Post reports that a Maryland firm, CNSI, that lost a $200 million contract when its Senior Vice President blew the whistle on irregularities in the award of the contract.  CNSI won a contract to process medicaid claims for the state of Louisiana while one of its former executives was Louisiana's Secretary of the Department of Health and Hospitals.  The contract was cancelled in 2013 and the Secretary of the Department of Health and Hospitals has been indicted for perjury.  CNSI claims that the whistle blower was a disgruntled employee who breached his contract and tortiously interfered.  An investigation into possible wrongdoing by CNSI in connection with the contract is ongoing.

August 28, 2015 in Celebrity Contracts, Government Contracting, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Weekly News Roundup

Rahm_EmanuelAccording to this report in the Chicago Sun Times, The Chicago Teachers' Union (CTU) is calling "strikeworthy" a proposal by Chicago Public Schools (CPS) CEO Forrest Claypool that teachers pay their full pension contributions.  The proposal would result in a seven percent pay cut according to CTU PresidentKaren Lewis.  The CTU had previously agreed to a seven percent "pension pick-up" in lieu of a pay raise.  Claypool now claims that there is no solution to CPS's $9.5 billion pension crisis that does not involve an end to the pick-up.  Chicago teachers will likely return to work without a contract and could strike at any time.   Mayor Rahm Emanuel (pictured) has proposed phasing out the pick-up over a period of years in an attempt to ease the blow.

The Los Angeles Times reports that UC San Diego and the University of Southern California (USC) have filed competing lawsuits in a battle over control of a long term research project that seeks to develop treatments for Alzheimer's.  A researcher at UC San Diego switched his affiliation to USC and has sought to take some of the project's funding with him.   In early rounds, a San Diego judge has sided with UC San Diego on ownership of the project, including databases relevant to the project's ongoing research.  Eli Lilly & Co. had pledged up to $76 million to UC San Diego to test a new Alzheimer's medication that the company is developing.  Lilly now plans to move those fund to USC's new institute.  The future of this research project seems caught in the cross-hairs of competing claims to contractual entitlement to both funding sources and intellectual property.

The Business Insider reported last week that Fox Sports analyst Craig James is suing the network, alleging that he was fired for voicing his opposition to gay marriage.  James alleges breach of contract and discrimination.  His termination, days after he was hired, allegedly relates to a statement he made in 2012 when he was running for U.S. Senate that gays and lesbians would have "to answer to the Lord for their actions."

August 13, 2015 in Current Affairs, Government Contracting, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 3, 2015

Weekly News Roundup

Donald_Trump_March_2015In the continuing fallout from Donald Trump's Presidential candidacy (photo right by Michael Vadon via Wikimedia Commons), Trump is now suing celebrity chef Jose Andres.  According to the Washington Times, Andres was to open a restaurant in Washington, DC's old post office building, which will soon be the Trump International Hotel.  He now claims that Trump's anti-immigrant comments make it impossible for him to do so.  It seems that Trump's attorneys' response is to claim that his views on immigration were well known and consistent and should not have come as a surprise to Mr. Andres.  The lawsuit seeks $10 million in damages.

ChristieIn other Presidential candidate news, three unions representing New Jersey public employees are suing the state for breach of contract.  The suit arises out of Governor Chris Christie's efforts to address a budget shortfall by cutting contributions to the state pension fund.  Excellent coverage of this suit and its background can be found in the Winnipeg Free Press here.

The Fay Observer reports that Intersal, a company that discovered the wreck of Blackbeard's ship of the coast of North Carolina, is suing North Carolina.  The suit alleges that the state has breached a contract pertaining to the use photos and video relating to the wreck and seeks $8.2 million in damages.

August 3, 2015 in Celebrity Contracts, Government Contracting, In the News, Recent Cases | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

New in Print

Pile of BooksWendy Netter Epstein, Facilitating Incomplete Contracts. 65 Case W. Res. L. Rev. 297 (2014)

W. Stanfield. Johnson, Hercules, Winstar, and the Supreme Court's Conspicuous and Potentially Consequential Error, 44 Pub. Cont. L.J. 199 (2015)

David Kenny & Rosemary Hennigan. Choice-of-Court Agreements, the Italian Torpedo, and the Recast of the Brussels I Regulation. 64 Int'l & Comp. L.Q. 197 (2015)

Thomas H. Koenig, & Michael L. Rustad, Fundamentally Unfair: An Empirical Analysis of Social Media Arbitration Clauses, 65 Case W. Res. L. Rev. 341 (2014)

Amy L. Peikoff, Of Third-Party Bathwater: How to Throw out the Third-Party Doctrine While Preserving Government's Ability to Use Secret Agents, 88 St. John's L. Rev. 349 (2014)

Katherine M. Urban, Sustainable Acquisition and the Post-Conflict Environment: Why Adopting a Federal Sustainable Procurement Policy for Post-Conflict Environments that Mirrors those Adopted by Some Local Governments Would Help Lead to Mission Success, 44 Pub. Cont. L.J. 261 (2015)

In addition, we have an entire symposium on Atlantic Marine and forum selection clauses form the Hastings Law Journal 

Hastings Law Journal

Atlantic Marine and Choice-of-Law Federalism

Andrew D. Bradt

Volume 66, Issue 3, 617-42

Full Article

Governing Law on Forum-Selection Agreements

Kevin M. Clermont

Volume 66, Issue 3, 643-74

Full Article

Atlantic Marine and the Future of Party Preference

Scott Dodson

Volume 66, Issue 3, 675-92

Full Article

Atlantic Marine and the Future of Forum Non Conveniens

Robin Effron

Volume 66, Issue 3, 693-718

Full Article

Gaming the System: Protecting Consumers from Unconscionable Contractual Forum-Selection and Arbitration Clauses

Linda S. Mullenix

Volume 66, Issue 3, 719-60

Full Article

Five Questions After Atlantic Marine

Stephen E. Sachs

Volume 66, Issue 3, 761-76

Full Article

Enforcing Forum-Selection Clauses

Bradley Scott Shannon

Volume 66, Issue 3, 777-94f

Full Article

Atlantic Marine Through the Lens of Erie

Adam N. Steinman

Volume 66, Issue 3, 795-822

Full Article



June 17, 2015 in Government Contracting, Recent Scholarship | Permalink

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

New in Print

KuttyI am happy to see a publication by my colleague Faisal Kutty (pictured) gracing this list of recent publications.  Way to go, Faisal!

Hiro N. Aragaki, The Federal Arbitration Act as Procedural Reform. 89 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 1939 (2014)

Robert Bejesky, The Economics of the Will to Fight: Public Choice in the Use of Private Contractors in Iraq, 45 Cumb. L. Rev. 1 (2014-2015)

Ann Laquer Estin, Foreign and Religious Family Law: Comity, Contract, and the Constitution. 41 Pepp. L. Rev. 1029 (2014)

Michelle Greenberg-Kobrin, Religious Tribunals and Secular Courts: Navigating Power and Powerlessness 41 Pepp. L. Rev. 997 (2014)

Faisal Kutty, "Islamic law" in U.S. Courts: Judicial Jihad or Constitutional Imperative? 41 Pepp. L. Rev. 1059 (2014)

Daphne Richemond-Barak, Can Self-Regulation Work? Lessons from the Private Security and Military Industry. 35 Mich. J. Int'l L. 773 (2014)

April 29, 2015 in Government Contracting, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 27, 2015

Weekly News Roundup

In yet another government outsourcing scheme gone wrong, KOLO TV news is reporting that Nevada is alleging breach of contract against the companies it hired to administer Common Core testing in the state's schools.  Apparently, when thousands of students attempted to log on so that they could take their exams, they received an error message and could not proceed.  Educators across the state are aggrieved, but students across the state are generally fine with it. 

Photo by Yamaguchi先生

Nonprofit Quarterly reports that three students, three parents and three alumnae are alleging breach of contract and seeking an injunction to keep open Sweet Briar College in Lynchburg, VA.  They allege that they had entered into express and implied agreements with the College that they would not only have the benefit of a four-year degree from the College but would also enjoy the benefits of being alumnae or of having children who were alumnae.

According to the Des Moines Register, in 2011, an 87-year-old grandmother was playing the slots, when the screen told her that she had a "bonus award" of $41797550.16.  Last week, Iowa's Supreme Court ruled unanimously that she had won $1.85.  They rejected claims of breach of an implied contract and found that the "bonus award" was just the product of a computer glitch.   

April 27, 2015 in Games, Government Contracting, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Tiered Water Pricing System Declared Unconstititional in California

On Monday, a California Appellate Court declared the tiered water payment system used by the city of San Juan Capistrano unconstitutional under Proposition 218 to the California Constitution.  The California Supreme Court had previously interpreted Prop. 218’s requirement that “no fees may be imposed for a service unless that service is actually used by, or immediately available to, the owner of the property in question” to mean that water rates must reflect the “cost of service attributable” to a particular parcel.

At least two-thirds of California water suppliers use some type of tiered structure depending on water usage.  For example, San Juan Capistrano had charged $2.47 per “unit” of water (748 gallons) for users in the first tier, but as much as $9.05 per unit in the fourth.  The Court did not declare tiered systems unconstitutional per se, but any tiering must be tied to the costs of providing the water.  Thus, water utilities do not have to discontinue all use of tiered systems, but they must at least do a better job of explaining just how such tiers correspond to the cost of providing the actual service at issue.  This could, for example, be done if heavy water users cause a water provider to incur additional costs, wrote the justices. 

The problem here is that at the same time, California Governor Jerry Brown has issued an executive order requiring urban communities to cut water use by 25% over the next year… that’s a lot, and soon!   Tiered systems are used as an incentive to save water much needed by, for example, farmers.  The California drought is getting increasingly severe, and with the above conflict between constitutional/contracting law and executive orders, it remains to be seen which other sticks and carrots such as education and tax benefits for lawn removals California cities can think of to meet the Governor’s order.  Happy Earth Day!

April 22, 2015 in Current Affairs, Famous Cases, Food and Drink, Government Contracting, In the News, Recent Cases | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

New in Print

Thursday, April 16, 2015

New in Print

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Mike Pence and Lambda Legal Reach Agreement

PenceIndiana Governor Mike Pence (pictured) is in a tough spot.  As reported here, Indiana is facing protests, threats of boycotts and possible losses of business opportunities as a result of its version of the state Religious Freedom Restoration Act.  As illustrated in the Indy Star here, Indiana's law makes it easier for individuals and business entities to rely on the statute as a defense to allegations of discriminatory treatment.  Even Pence's predecessor, Mitch Daniels, in his current capacity as a university president, has distanced himself from the law.  

Pence is in a tough spot because he signed the law to show his conservative bona fides, perhaps because he has aspirations to national executive office.  But he may have overreached, as the backlash against the new law may hurt his chances to appeal to a national electorate.  Pence's position is made more difficult by the fact that he now wants the Indiana legislature to "clarify" the law so that it doesn't look like it was designed to discriminate.  But the Indiana legislators may well have exactly the clarity they wanted, and they do not share Pence's national aspirations. 

Lambda Legal is among the many organizations that have objected to the law as a license to discriminate against LGBT groups, especially in the context of same-sex marriages.  Now Lambba is offering Pence a way out. In a draft contract that the parties have shared with this blog (and only with this blog as far as we know), Pence and Lambda have agreed that Pence will hire LGBT applicants for at least 30% of staff associated with his current position as Governor of Indiana and as part of his election staff leadership for all political campaigns through 2020.  "I may lead a red state," Pence told our correspondent, "but I expect to be flying the rainbow flag over the White House in a few years."  A Lambda spokesperson said that details of the agreement are still being negotiated but that "all us us are Lambda are looking forward to a faaabulous Inaugural Ball."

Clearly this a win-win.

April 1, 2015 in Government Contracting, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

New in Print

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Physicist Publishes Autobiography, Defying the Department of Energy: A Contracts Take

Building the H-BombMy friend Ken Ford is enjoying his fifteen minutes of fame, courtesy of the Department of Energy (D0E), which is displeased with his memoir, Building the H-Bomb: A Personal History.  According to this report in the New York Times, DoE officials told Dr. Ford to make cuts to his book that would have eliminated 10% of the text.  DoE personnel flagged 60 separate passages in the book for editing.

This demand (and the DoE made clear that it was making demands not requests) came as a surprise to Dr. Ford, who had submitted the book for DoE review expecting the process to be a mere formality.  In Dr. Ford's view, the book contains no secrets, as the information that he included in his book relating to the history of the hydrogen bomb either had been previously disclosed or was released to him through FOIA requests.  The DoE sees things differently, but the agency is unlikely to respond to the publication of Dr. Ford's book, in large part because any action it takes would only draw attention to the information whose disclosure it regards as improper.  

The Times articles covers the story well and provides some examples of material that the DoE regards as classified but Dr. Ford regards as public.  We would like to focus on a couple of contractual issues.  First, the Times references Ken's alleged contractual obligation arising from a non-disclosure agreement he signed in the 50s.  Dr. Ford does not recall what that agreement said, but he provided this blog with a copy of a similar agreement dated from September 2014.  The DoE asked Dr. Ford to sign this new non-disclosure agreement  in connection with its review of his manuscript.   That document provides the government with multiple remedies should Dr. Ford reveal any classified information, including:

  • termination of security clearances and government employment;
  • recovery of royalties and other benefits that might result from any sort of disclosure of classified information; and 
  • criminal prosecution under Titles 18 and 50 of the U.S. Code and the Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982.

Given this non-disclosure agreement, one would expect that Dr. Ford's publisher would be reluctant to publish the book, fearing that it too might become a target of government scrutiny.  In order to protect his publisher against liability, Dr. Ford agreed to amend his publication agreement to expand the usual indemnification clause.  The additional language in the contract provides that Dr. Ford will indemnify his publisher "against any suit, demand, claim or recovery, finally sustained, by reason of . . . any material whose dissemination is judged by the United States Government to have violated the Author's obligations regarding the handling of sensitive information."  

Steven Aftergood provides further information on the Federation of American Science Secrecy blog here.  

Dr. Ford provides an overview of the story that his book tells, as well as links to about a score of documents, eight of which are annotated with Dr. Ford's comments, on George Washington University's National Security Archives.

March 31, 2015 in Books, Government Contracting, In the News, Science | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Water Contracts and Adequate Assurances (to Continue Business as Usual)

Some weeks ago, I blogged here about water rights and shortages in drought-ridden California.  Of course, California is not the only state where contractual water rights interface with development and public health concerns. 

In Ohio, shale driller Gulfport Energy recently filed suit against the town of Barnesville for rights to extract water for Gulfport’s fracking operations.  Gulfport had a contract with Barnesville entitling it to draw water from a local reservoir at one cent per gallon.  Under the contract, Gulfport would be able to draw the water unless the village determined that such action would endanger public health.  Water rights were subsequently also issued to another driller.  In the fall of 2014, the village told Gulfport to stop drawing water from the reservoir because of too low water levels.  Gulfport’s suit now asks for adequate assurances of performance of the water contract to ensure that it can continue its fracking operations. 

Whether that is a good idea is another story.  From a short-term perspective: yes, we need energy preferably domestically sourced to avoid international supply interruptions and the geopolitical problems that are associated with importing energy raw materials.  But fracking and fossil fuel production in general are associated with other severe problems including heavy water usage in the case of fracking.  Such water, the argument goes, is better used for other things such as farming and household consumption. 

Business as usual for fracking companies may not be the best idea seen from a societal point of view.  Contracts rights are only a small part of this much bigger problem.  However, time seems to have come for governments to incorporate escape clauses not only for “public health concerns” into water contracts, but also for drought concerns.  This is not always done, as the above case shows, but such a relatively easy step could help solve at least some contractual disputes.  In times of increasing temperatures and decreasing rainfall in some areas, such contract drafting may well make sense.

March 26, 2015 in Commentary, Current Affairs, Food and Drink, Government Contracting, True Contracts | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Artistic license

Artistic License

The official portrait of former President Bill Clinton has been completed.  See it here.   It was painted in the “conservative realistic style” … maybe a little too realistic and not sufficiently conservative?

According to the artist, Nelson Shanks, the bluish shadow of a person that you see on the mantelpiece next to Clinton is that of Monica Lewinski in her infamous blue dress.  You got that right: the artist himself has admitted that he purposefully scarred the picture just as the Lewinsky scandal scarred Clinton’s second term.  The artist has apparently caught quite some flak for having done this.  Regardless of artistic freedom and setting aside all thoughts about the scandal per se, what is, after all, at issue here is a contract for artwork depicting a former President of the United States of America.  A bit more respect may have been in order.  This was not any regular client having a portrait done; it’s in effect the entire nation that commissioned this work.  Perhaps a subjective satisfaction clause would have been in order here.  Even if it had been any “regular” client, deliberately depicting one’s paying client in a highly controversial light seems to me to be in questionable taste. 

On the other hand, the argument has been made that if the artist had been held to certain contractual stipulations, the portrait of the 42nd President would have been “stiff and untrue.”  

That’s not the case?  Take a look and judge for yourself.  While much has been made of Clinton holding an actual, gash, newspaper – so retro – the strange positioning of his fingers on his hip looks more bizarre to me.  An indication of his alleged two-sided look at what constituted “the truth” in certain contexts?  To me, it looks more like the V sign for, perhaps, Clinton’s ultimate victory over at least some of the political and other challenges he faced.  




March 5, 2015 in Commentary, Government Contracting, In the News, True Contracts | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Construction Contracts that Kill

Property development is often considered a way for local communities to earn more taxes and evolve with times in general.  But when construction and other development is approved in geologically risk areas such as flood zones and things go awfully wrong, is this a mere property and contracts issue, or may criminal liability lie?

In France, the answer is the latter.  The former mayor of the small French seaside town La Faute-sur-Mer  was just sentenced to jail for four years for deliberately hiding flood risks so that he and the town could benefit from the “cash cow” of property development, a French court has held.  His deputy mayor received a two-year sentence in the same plot.

In 2010, the cyclone Xynthia hit western Europe and knocked down seawalls in the French town, leading to severe floods and 29 deaths. 

Wait… a cyclone in France?  Yes.  Climate change is real and it’s here.  Unless we do something about it (which apparently we don’t), things will only get worse.  As on-the-ground steps that could prevent extreme results such as the above are often simply ignored or postponed while more and more research is done and money saved at various government scales, lawsuits will necessarily follow.  The legal disciplines, including contracts law, will have to conform to the new realities of a rapidly changing climate.  For starters, we need to seriously question the wisdom and continued desirability of constructing more and more homes in coastal and other flood prone areas.  Ignoring known risks is, well, criminal.

February 11, 2015 in Commentary, Current Affairs, Government Contracting, Labor Contracts, Science | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 2, 2015

New in Print (including a new book!)

Books 5Giles Cuniberti, The International Market for Contracts: The Most Attractive Contract Laws. 34 Nw. J. Int'l L. & Bus. 455 (2014) 

Robert W. Emerson, Fortune Favors the Franchisor: Survey and Analysis of the Franchisee's Decision whether to Hire Counsel, 51 San Diego L. Rev. 709 (2014)

Shelby D. Green, Contesting Disclaimer-of-Reliance Clauses by Efficiency, Free Will, and Conscience: Staving off Caveat Emptor, 2 Tex. A&M L. Rev 1 (2014)

Cameron S. Hamrick & Michelle E. Litteken, CICA Stay Overrides at the Court of Federal Claims: What Government Contractors Need to Know, 43 Pub. Cont. L.J. 687-713 (2014)

James W. Nelson, GAO-COFC Concurrent Bid Protest Jurisdiction: Are Two Fora Too Many? 43 Pub. Cont. L.J. 587 (2014).

Aaron S. Ralph, Transaction Management: A Systemic Approach to Procurement Reform, 43 Pub. Cont. L.J. 621 (2014)

Steven M. Seigel, War Claims and Private Security Contractors: The Strategic and Regulatory Benefits of Paying Host-Nation Claims against U.S. Contractors, 43 Pub. Cont. L.J. 653 (2014)

Heather K. Way, & Lucy Wood. Contracts for Deed: Charting Risks and New Paths for Advocacy. 23 J. Affordable Housing & Commun. Dev. L. 37 (2014)


Accessory Liability

Paul S Davies

Accessory liability in the private law is of great importance. Claimants often bring claims against third parties who participate in wrongs. For example, the ‘direct wrongdoer’ may be insolvent, so a claimant might prefer a remedy against an accessory in order to obtain satisfactory redress. However, the law in this area has not received the attention it deserves. The criminal law recognises that any person who ‘aids, abets, counsels or procures’ any offence can be punished as an accessory, but the private law is more fragmented. One reason for this is a tendency to compartmentalise the law of obligations into discrete subjects, such as contract, trusts, tort and intellectual property. This book suggests that by looking across such boundaries in the private law, the nature and principles of accessory liability can be better understood and doctrinal confusion regarding the elements of liability, defences and remedies resolved.

Please click here to view the table of contents for this book

Paul S Davies is an Associate Professor in Law at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St Catherine’s College, Oxford.

January 2015     9781849462877     302pp     Hardback     RSP: £55  

Discount Price for Contracts Prof Blog Readers: £44

Please click here to order online. When ordering online please type the reference 'CONTRACTSPROFBLOG' in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’ to receive the discount.

If you have any questions please contact Hart Publishing

Hart Publishing Ltd, 16C Worcester Place, Oxford, OX1 2JW

Telephone Number: 01865 517 530 Fax Number: 01865 510 710


February 2, 2015 in Books, Government Contracting, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 12, 2015

Weekly News Roundup

A misplaced comma (or something) cost an Oregon Ducks fan his premium seats to the college football championship game.  According to this report from The Oregonian, a University of Oregon alumnus found premium tickets to the game (which he knew were selling for $4000) for $400 on StubHub.  When, he placed his order, StubHub indicated that he would be charged $16,59.36, but his credit card was charged $16,059.36.  He protested, and StubHub refused to honor the purchase, removing the charge and offering $1600 in StubHub vouchers, which the angry Duck says he will not use.  He blows off some steam in a blog post, with observations about obnoxious terms and conditions.

In a sign of the times, MasterCard has filed suit in the Southern Distroct of New York against Nike, according to this report from Bloomberg.and Oregon Live (you have to go through a short survey to read it), for having poached a few of its cyber-security experts.  MasterCard is suing the employees for breach of contract and Nike for tortious interference.  Nike denies all wrongdoing.

We could not have made this up: The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Devin James Group (DLG), a public relations firm, is suing another public relations firm, Elasticity.  Apparently, Elasticity hired DLG to help represent the City of Ferguson in the aftermath of the shooting of Michael Brown.  Elasticity fired DLG when it discovered that DLG's owner had a criminal record.  Mr. James was convicted in 2006 for having shot an unarmed man.  He claims he did $50,000 of work for which he has not been paid. 

In another chapter in the dangers of state governments hiring private companies to handle public services, reports that Hewlett Packard will refund New Jersey $7.5 million to get out of its contract to deliver a unifed system to administers the state's public assistance program.  The Christie administration and HP agreed last year to suspend work on the project and they entered into a separation agreement in which each side agreed not to sue the other for breach of contract.  The state is now looking for a new partner.  In the meantime, it "continues to hobble along on its 1980s-era mainframe system," according to

Finally, an interesting conflict between a franchise and a large franchisee.  Wendy's is requiring its franchisees to make technology upgrades and renovate stotes.  DavCo, which operates 152 Wendy's restaurants is refusing to do so, claiming that Wendy's lacks the authority to require the changes.  According to the Baltimore Sun, Wendy's has filed suit to terminate DavCo's franchises.

January 12, 2015 in Food and Drink, Government Contracting, In the News, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)