ContractsProf Blog

Editor: D. A. Jeremy Telman
Valparaiso Univ. Law School

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Monday, October 14, 2013

More on Google Apps for Education

After posting earlier today on the privacy issues associated with Gmail for those of us whose work accounts are Gmail accounts, I learned that Google's general terms of service do not necessarily apply to institutional accounts.  

Here's some language from the Google Apps for Education website:

Any data you put into Google Apps is yours, and it says just that in our contracts. Your information is safe from other organisations, even though it's all on the same servers. Apps’ powerful, easy-to-use tools help administrators manage things like users, documents and services, and keep track of usage and data via dashboards. And of course you fully own the data, not Google.

That's rather comforting, but then there is this:

Google Apps is governed by a detailed Privacy Policy, which ensures we will not inappropriately share or use personal information placed in our systems. Google complies with applicable US privacy law, and the Google Apps Terms of Service can specifically detail our obligations and compliance with FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) regulations. Google is registered with the US-EU Safe Harbor agreement, which helps ensure that our data protection compliance meets European Union standards for educational institutions.

I find this less comforting because of the word "inapropriately" and because US privacy law and FERPA may not be enough to address all of the privacy issues involved.

If anybody has knowledge or information about this, pelase feel free to chime in.

[JT]

October 14, 2013 in About this Blog, Commentary, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Another New Blog Joins the Law Professor Blog Network

LPBNAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blog Network, of which this blog is a proud member, a new Law Deans on Legal Education Blog has just been launched: 

From the inaugural post:

We are pleased to introduce our new blog devoted to legal education from the perspective of law deans. We hope this blog will provide a place where you will find information, opinions, and thoughts about a range of topics and issues related to legal education. The editors of this blog are Dean Richard Gershon of the University of Mississippi School of Law, Dean Paul McGreal of the University of Dayton School of Law, and Dean Cynthia Fountaine of the Southern Illinois University School of Law. We look forward to sharing our thoughts about legal education with you and hope you enjoy our blog.

[JT]

October 8, 2013 in About this Blog, Law Schools, Teaching, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

New Member of the LPBN: Gender and the Law Prof Blog

LPBNAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blog Network, of which this blog is a proud member,  John Kang and Tracy Thomas have just launched the Gender and the Law Prof Blog.  Here's the intro:

Welcome to the new Gender and the Law Blog.  Your coeditors are John Kang and Tracy Thomas.  John is Professor of Law at St. Thomas and he offers his perspective on masculinities and constitutional analysis.  He is presently finishing a book called Manliness and the Constitution. In his spare time, he runs, reads nonfiction and argues with his children.  Tracy is the Aileen McMurray Professor of Law at Akron and brings her feminist and litigator perspectives.  Her work includes the annual edition of West’s Women and the Lawthe book Feminist Legal History (with T.J. Boisseau), and her recent article on the misuse of women’s history in the pro-life movement.  She spends her spare time chauffeuring. Let the blogging begin.

[JT]

 

September 18, 2013 in About this Blog, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay, Concluding Post

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

We Welcome Four New Blogs to the LPBN Family

LPBNAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blog Network, of which this blog is a proud member,  has added four new blogs.  They are:

  • Business Law Prof Blog, by C. Steven Bradford (Nebraska), Eric C. Chaffee (Toledo), Joshua P. Fershee (West Virginia), Marcia L. Narine (St. Thomas), Stefan J. Padfield (Akron) & Anne Tucker (Georgia State)
  • Education Law Prof Blog, by Derek Black (South Carolina) LaJuana Davis (Cumberland) & Areto Imoukhuede (Nova)
  • Elder Law Prof Blog, by Kim Dayton (William Mitchell), Rebecca C. Morgan (Stetson) & Katherine C. Pearson (Penn State)
  • Marijuana Law, Policy & Reform, by Douglas A. Berman (Ohio State)

We welcome our colleagues to the wonderful world of blogging and wish them all great success.

[JT]

September 10, 2013 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: The Third Week's Contributors

We continue our online symposium inspired by Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: On the Empirical and the Lyrical (Jean Braucher, John Kidwell, and William C. Whitford, eds., Hart Publishing 2013) with two more posts this week.

LinzerPeter Linzer is a Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center, where he has taught since 1984.  Before going into teaching, Professor Linzer practiced law both as a Wall Street lawyer and as an Assistant Corporation Counsel for the City of New York. Professor Linzer is a member of the American Law Institute.  Professor Linzer has served as the Chair of the Contracts Section of the Association of American Law Schools and is a Board Certified civil appellate specialist. He served for nearly a decade on the Pattern Jury Charge Committee of the State Bar of Texas. His principal academic subjects include Contracts; Constitutional Law; Equal Protection; First Amendment; International Contracting; Transactional Clinic; Contract Negotiation and Drafting; Introduction to American Law (for foreign LL. M. candidates); and Torts. Working with experienced practitioners, he pioneered a transactional course in international contracting that sees students negotiate and draft documents in simulated international deals.  

Professor Linzer is a repeat offender, having participated in our last symposium on Peggy Radin's Boilerplate.  A list of his publications can be found here.

Gordon SmithGordon Smith is Associate Dean and Glen L. Farr Professor of Law at BYU's Reuben Clark Law School.  Professor Smith's research focuses on corporate and securities law, with particular emphases on Delaware corporate law and entrepreneurial finance. His work has appeared in many top law reviews, and he has co-authored a popular casebook, Business Organizations: Cases, Problems & Case Studies, with Professor Cynthia Williams of the University of Illinois Law School.

Prior to joining the BYU law faculty, Professor Smith taught law at the University of Wisconsin, where he served as Associate Director of the Initiative for Studies in Technology Entrepreneurship (InSiTE). He also taught at Lewis & Clark Law School and has been a visiting professor of law at Vanderbilt University, Arizona State University and Washington University. He has taught courses at universities in Australia, China, England, Finland, France, Germany, and Hong Kong.

Before entering academe, Professor Smith clerked for Judge W. Eugene Davis in the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and was an associate in the Delaware office of the international law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.

Some of Professor Smith's publications can be found here.

Lyrical CoverBelow are links to previous posts from the symposium:

An introduction to the symposium

Biographical information about the first week's contributors

Jay Feinman, Ambitition and Humility in Contract Law

Alan Hyde, Stewart Macaulay, System Builder

Kate O'Neill, The Mess We're In

Deborah Post, One Contracts Professor's Preference for State Court Decisions

An introduction to the second week's contributors

Gillian Hadfield, Maybe Contract Law Isn't Dead After All

Jonathan Lipson, Relational Reorganization

[JT]

September 3, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Commentary, Contract Profs, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Support the Blog By Doing What You Would Do Anyway!

Amazon-affiliate

We would like to let you in on a dirty little secret.  This blog is a money-making operation.  

Yup.  We're as surprised as you are.  But don't worry.  So far we have been investing all proceeds back into legal scholarship by supporting the annual International Conferences on Contracts like the one this past February in Fort Worth.  With the added revenues derived from the re-design of the blog and the re-organization of the Law Professor Blog Network, of which we are a part, we hope to contribute in a more substantial way in years to come.

If you would like to support the ContractsProf Blog, please consider making purchases from Amazon through links on the blog (via the Shop Amazon tab on the top navigation bar, the Search Amazon box in the right column, and links embedded in selected individual). As an "Amazon Affiliate," a portion of any purchases you make will be credited to ContractsProf Blog, at no cost to you.

[JT]

August 27, 2013 in About this Blog, Books | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 26, 2013

Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: The Second Week's Contributors

We continue our online symposium inspired by Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: On the Empirical and the Lyrical (Jean Braucher, John Kidwell, and William C. Whitford, eds., Hart Publishing 2013) with two posts this week. All of this made possible through the organizational genius of Jean Braucher, who recruited the participants in this symposium.  So we at the blog are all very grateful to her.

HadfieldGillian K. Hadfield is the Richard L. and Antoinette Schamoi Kirtland professor of law and professor of economics at the University of Southern California. She studies the design of legal and dispute resolution systems; contracting; and the performance and regulation of legal markets and the legal profession. 

Her recent publications include “What is Law:  A Coordination Model of the Characteristics of Legal Order” (with Barry Weingast, Journal of Legal Analysis 2012); "The Dynamic Quality of Law: Judicial Incentives, Legal Human Capital and the Adaptation of Law (Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 2011); "Legal Infrastructure for the New Economy” (I/S:  Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society 2012) and "Higher Demand, Lower Supply? A Comparative Assessment of the Legal Resource Landscape for Ordinary Americans" (Fordham Urban Law Journal 2010).

Professor Hadfield holds a B.A.H. from Queen’s University, a J.D. from Stanford Law School and Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. She served as clerk to Chief Judge Patricia Wald on the U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit. She has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Columbia and NYU law schools, a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution. She is a member of the American Law Institute, director of the American Law and Economics Association and the International Society for New Institutional Economics and past president of the Canadian Law and Economics Association.  She serves on advisory boards for the Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law, LegalZoom, Pearl.com, and Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, and on the Editorial Committee of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science.  

More of Professor Hadfield's publications can be found here.

Lipson Headshot S11

 Jonathan Lipson is the Harold E. Kohn Professor of Law at Temple University's Beasley School of Law.  Professor Lipson teaches commercial, corporate and bankruptcy law courses, including a deal-based simulation. From 2010-2012, he was the Foley & Lardner Professor of Law at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

His research focuses on business failure systems, with a particular emphasis on the role that information forcing rules play in influencing outcomes. He has written a number of articles about the informational aspects of the U.S. secured credit system, the bankruptcy system, and the role that lawyers play in designing and implementing transactions under the risk of financial failure. He is an occasional empiricist, having authored the first qualitative empirical study of lawyers’ practice of writing third-party closing opinions (which was selected for presentation at the 2005 Yale/Stanford Junior Faculty Forum). He has also developed a unique data set on the use of examiners in large Chapter 11 bankruptcy cases. 

He has a side expertise on constitutional issues in bankruptcy. He has authored papers on, among other things, the Catholic diocese bankruptcies, sovereign immunity defenses in bankruptcy, and the larger structural questions presented by the Bankruptcy Clause of the United States Constitution.

Before beginning a teaching career, Professor Lipson practiced corporate, commercial and bankruptcy law in Boston, with the firm of Hill & Barlow (1995 – 1999), and in New York with Kirkland & Ellis (1992 – 1995) and Milbank Tweed (1990-1992). 

Cropped Cover (1)He holds several leadership positions in the Business Law Section of the American Bar Association, where he is a Section Content Officer.  Previously, he was Chair of the Publications Board, and Chair of the Committee on Business Law Education. He was the Chair of the Section on Commercial and Related Consumer Law of the Association of American Law Schools (2002-2003). He was elected in 2005 to the American Law Institute.   Professor Lipson speaks and blogs frequently on business law subjects, including corporate reorganization and business law education. He also served as an expert witness in certain complex reorganizations including, most prominently, Enron’s bankruptcy.

His work has appeared in, among others, the UCLA Law Review, the Boston University Law Review, the Notre Dame Law Review, the Business Lawyer, the University of Southern California Law Review, the Washington University Law Review, the Minnesota Law Review and the Wisconsin Law Review . 

More of Professor Lipson's publications can be found here.

Below are links to last week's posts:

An introduction to the symposium

Biographical information about last week's contributors

Jay Feinman, Ambitition and Humility in Contract Law

Alan Hyde, Stewart Macaulay, System Builder

Kate O'Neill, The Mess We're In

Deborah Post, One Contracts Professor's Preference for State Court Decisions

We look forward to another lively week of contributions.

[JT]

August 26, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Commentary, Contract Profs, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 23, 2013

Our Re-Design

PaulIf you are reading this post, and if it is not the first post you have ever read on the ContractsProf Blog, then you have noticed that we have a new look.  All of this is thanks to a global re-design at the Law Professor Blog Network (LPBN), headed up by Paul Caron (pictured).

This is our third day with the new look, and the impact on our readership has been dramatic!  Of course, the uptick in our readership is also explained in part by the advent of a new semester, always a good time for people to check in, and by the very exciting symposium on the contracts scholarship of Stewart Macaulay, which ought to be attracting some new readers.  Still, our daily readership has tripled since the re-design, and we have never had results like that either at the beginning of a new academic year or in connection with one of our virtual symposia.  So, we think a great deal of the credit has to go to the re-design.

The re-design includes a bunch of new features with which we ourselves are not yet fully aware.  We will tell you more about them as we play around with the platform and discover its nuances.  Paul Caron has himself explained the purposes behind the redesign in this piece that is availabe on SSRN.  Here is an excerpt from the abstract:

The re-design will (1) optimize each blog for viewing across a variety of platforms (desktop, laptop, tablet, and smart phone); (2) better integrate social media; (3) provide more robust analytics with richer and more accurate readership data; and (4) strengthen our partnership with Wolters Kluwer/Aspen Publishers and provide additional avenues for monetization

We here at the ContractsProf Blog cannot equal the expertise of the TaxProfs in money matters, but our interpretation of the last line of Paul's abstract is that the re-design is going to make us all rich!

[JT]

August 23, 2013 in About this Blog, Web/Tech, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 16, 2013

Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: The First Week's Contributors

We begin our online symposium inspired by Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: On the Empirical and the Lyrical (Jean Braucher, John Kidwell, and William C. Whitford, eds., Hart Publishing 2013) with four posts next week. In addition to helping edit the book Jean Braucher has also been instrumental in recruiting participants and shaping this symposium.  So we at the blog are all very grateful to her.

This post will serve to introduce next week's guest bloggers.

FeinmanJay Feinman is Distinguished Professor of Law at Rutgers School of Law‒Camden. He writes and teaches in contracts, insurance law, and torts. His books include Delay, Deny, Defend: Why Insurance Companies Don’t Pay Claims and What You Can Do About ItLaw 101: Everything You Need to Know About American Law; and Professional Liability to Third Parties. His contracts scholarship includes articles on relational contract theory (“The Insurance Relationship as Relational Contract and the ‘Fairly Debatable’ Rule for First-Party Bad Faith,” 46 San Diego L. Rev. (2009); “Relational Contract Theory in Context,” 94 Nw. U. L. Rev. 737 (1999), critical legal studies (“Critical Approaches to Contract Law,” 30 UCLA Law Review 829 (1983)), and formation doctrine (“Is an Advertisement an Offer? Why It Is, and Why It Matters,” 58 Hastings L.J. 61 (2006)). In the AALS, Feinman  has served as chair of the Section on Contracts and chair of the planning committee for the contracts conference. At Rutgers, he has served as Associate Dean and Acting Dean of the law school and a member of the Rutgers Center for Risk and Responsibility, and he has received every teaching prize awarded by the university.

Links to many of Professor Feinman's publications can be found here.

Hyde headshotAlan Hyde is Distinguished Professor and Sidney Reitman Scholar at Rutgers University School of Law, Newark, where he writes mostly about labor, employment, and immigration law.  He is a member of the American Law Institute and consultant to the Restatement of Employment Law.  He also teaches contracts and discusses contracts in his books Bodies of Law (1997), Working in Silicon Valley (2003), and articles on covenants not to compete and employment contracts that contracts teachers do not read.

Links to many of Professor Hydes publications can be found here.

Kate O'Neill's principal interests are contracts, copyright, legal rhetoric, and law school teaching.  She shares the following biographical details:

OneillKateI am a professor at University of Washington School of Law.  I have been teaching Contracts for about 15 years.  I started out, copying my colleagues, by using the Dawson casebook. I had first encountered contracts as a student with a much earlier edition of the same book.  I embarrassed to admit that I began teaching contracts without much insight into the subject, and I can’t remember exactly when I first discovered Macaulay and relational contracts theory.  I certainly had not encountered them in my own legal education, although my four years of commercial practice did perhaps make me susceptible to their insights.  But what a relief they were!  I have been teaching from Macaulay, et al., contracts: law in Action for many years now.

If you are interested in why we teach contracts as most of us do, you might enjoy a piece I wrote about Richard Posner’s effect on casebooks and law teaching.  Rhetoric Counts: What We Should Teach When We Teach Posner, 39 Seton Hall L. Rev. 507 (2009).   

Links to many of Professor O'Neill's publications can be found here.

PostDeborah Post is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Faculty Development and Professor of Law at Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center. She began her legal career working in the corporate section of a law firm in Houston, Texas, Bracewell & Patterson, now renamed Bracewell & Guiliani. She left practice to teach at the University of Houston Law School and moved to New York to Touro Law Center in 1987. She has been a visiting professor at Syracuse Law School, DePaul Law School, and State University of New Jersey Rutgers School of Law Newark. She also has taught as an adjunct at Hofstra Law School, UMass Dartmouth and St. Johns University School of Law. Professor Post has written for and about legal education. Among her most notable publications are a book on legal education, Cultivating Intelligence: Power, Law and the Politics of Teaching written with a colleague, Louise Harmon and a casebook in Contract, Contracting Law, with co-authors Amy Kastely and Nancy Ota. She has been a member of the Society of American Law Teachers Board of Governors for ten years and was co-president of that organization with Professor Margaret Barry from 2008-2010.

Links to many of Professor Post's publications can be found here.

We look forward to an engaging first round of posts.

[JT]

August 16, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Contract Profs, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Introducing our Virtual Symposium: Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay

This symposium marks the publication of Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: On the Empirical and the Lyrical (Hart Publishing 2013), a volume edited by Jean Braucher, John Kidwell, and William C. Whitford.  Starting next week and continuing for several weeks, this blog will publish entries both by contributors to the book and by others who have engaged with Macaulay’s work in the field of contracts.

MacaulayFifty years ago, the American Sociological Review published Macaulay’s Non-Contractual  Relations in Business—A Preliminary Study, an empirical examination of the use and, more strikingly, the non-use of contracts in business.  One of the 20 most cited articles in the history of ASR, its influence has grown with each passing decade.  Macaulay (pictured) has produced an impressive number of other significant articles in contract law, as well as influential work in law and social science, and is the lead author of the casebook, Contracts: Law in Action, Vol. I and II (LexisNexis 3rd Ed. 2010/2011), co-authored by Braucher, Kidwell, and Whitford (introduction  available here). 

“Bill Whitford, the late John Kidwell, and I wanted to celebrate Macaulay’s contributions to contracts scholarship, particularly his use of law in action and relational perspectives,” explains Jean Braucher, Roger C. Henderson Professor of Law at the University of Arizona.  “We were extremely pleased that leading and rising scholars contributed 15 original chapters to the book, everything from theoretical essays to new empirical work to relational critiques of legal doctrine.”  Braucher adds that Kidwell, who died in 2012, participated fully in the development of the book and edited several of the chapters.

Cropped Cover (1)Kidwell, Whitford, and Macaulay all served for many years on the faculty at the Wisconsin Law School, where the law in action approach is a tradition.  Whitford and Macaulay are both emeritus professors there. Macaulay, who joined the Wisconsin law faculty in 1957, has held two named professorships there, serving as the Malcolm Pitman Sharp Professor and Theodore W. Brazeau Professor of Law.

Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay begins with Non-Contractual Relations in Business, reproduced in full, and then provides extended excerpts from two other significant articles by Macaulay, Private Legislation and the Duty to Read—Business Run by IBM Machine, the Law of Contracts and Credit Cards (1966) and The Real Deal and the Paper Deal: Empirical Pictures of Relationships, Complexity and the Urge for Transparent Simple Rules (2003).  The book also includes 15 chapters written by other scholars, Brian H. Bix, David Campbell, Jay M. Feinman, Robert W. Gordon, Claire A. Hill, Charles L. Knapp, Ethan J. Lieb, Li-Wen Lin, Deborah Waire Post, Edward Rubin, Carol Sanger, Robert E. Scott, D. Gordon Smith, Josh Whitford, John Wightman, and William J. Woodward, Jr.  The book’s table of contents and preface are available here (giving the title and author of each chapter, briefly describing each chapter, and providing an overview of Macaulay’s career and contributions to contracts teaching).

[JT]

August 15, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Contract Profs, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, July 26, 2013

Away (again)!

Dear Readers,

Next week might be a bit slower than usual on the blog.  As you read this, I am pedaling my way (for the second time)  from Chicago to Michigan.  It's not that long a ride for a serious bike rider, but I'm a law prof. . . .   If I survive, my posts should start showing up again some time in the middle of the week.

 

Loaded_touring_bicycle
Taken from the Wikimedia Commons, this image shows an example of a loaded touring bicycle with drop bars and 700c wheels.  The picture is taken on the Tibetan Plateau, in the Amdo Region. Brought to you courtesy of Keithonearth

 

[JT]

July 26, 2013 in About this Blog | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Website for Law Professor's Book about Wrap Contracts Contains a Wrap Contract!

KimThose of you who read the previous post and clicked on the link to get a sneak peak at Nancy Kim's forthcoming book, Wrap Contracts, may have noticed the banner at the top of the screen, which reads:

We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By clicking 'continue' or by continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

There may be some irony in this situation, or perhaps it is strategic: the website performs, and makes one of Nancy's points for her.  Wrap contracts are everywhere and have become an unavoidable fact of life for the computer literate.

[JT]

July 11, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, June 7, 2013

Coming Next Week: Two Guest Posts on Kenneth Adams' Contracts Drafting Style Manual

AdamsNext week, we will have two guests posts reviewing Kenneth A. Adams, A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting (3d ed.).

From the book's website:

With A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting, Kenneth A. Adams has created a uniquely in-depth survey of the building blocks of contract language. First published in 2004, it offers those who draft, review, negotiate, or interpret contracts an alternative to the dysfunction of traditional contract language and the flawed conventional wisdom that perpetuates it. This manual has become a vital resource throughout the legal profession, in the U.S. and internationally.

This is the third edition of A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting. One-third longer than the second edition (published in 2008) and in a larger format, it contains much new material and has otherwise been revised and supplemented, making it even more essential.

This manual's focus remains how to express contract terms in prose that is free of the archaisms, redundancies, ambiguities, and other problems that afflict traditional contract language. With exceptional analysis and an unmatched level of practical detail, Adams highlights common sources of confusion and recommends clearer and more concise alternatives. This manual is organized to facilitate easy reference, and it illustrates its analysis with numerous examples. Consult it to save time in drafting and negotiation and to reduce the risk of dispute.

Our reviewers are:

BarnhizerDaniel D. Barnhizer, Professor of Law & The Bradford Stone Faculty Scholar, Michigan State University College of Law.  

Professor Barnhizer graduated with honors from Harvard Law School, where he served as managing editor of the Harvard Environmental Law Review. After graduation, he was a judicial clerk for the Honorable Richard L. Nygaard, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, and for the Honorable Robert B. Krupansky, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, sitting by designation on the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio. Professor Barnhizer has practiced as a litigator with the law firms of Hogan & Hartson and Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft. Before joining the MSU College of Law faculty, he was an adjunct professor of law at American University - Washington College of Law, where he taught legal reasoning, research, and writing. At MSU Law, he teaches Contracts, Contract Theory, Business Enterprises, Securities Litigation, and Legal History.

Some of Professor Barnhizers scholarship can be found here.

Irma S. Russell, Dean and Professor of Law, University of Montana School of Law.

RussellIrmaPrior to coming to Montana, Dean Russell was the NELPI Professor and Director of the National Energy-Environment Law & Policy Institute at the University of Tulsa College of Law.  She became Dean of the University of Montana School of Law in 2009.

Dean Russell is immediate past chair of the ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources and the immediate past chair of the AALS Section of Natural Resources and Energy Law.  She is a newly appointed member of the Board of Dividing the Waters, an organization of judges and lawyers focused on issues of water adjudication in the Western United States.  She has served as the chair of the Professionalism Committee of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar and as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Professionalism and the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility.  She also has served as a member of the Executive Committee and Secretary of the AALS Natural Resources Section and as chair of chair of the AALS Section on Professional Responsibility, the AALS Section on Socio-Economics, and as a member of the Publications Committee of the Center for Professional Responsibility.

Dean Russell earned undergraduate degrees in liberal arts and education, a master’s degree in English literature, and her law degree at the University of Kansas. She clerked for The Honorable James K. Logan, United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Russell engaged in private practice for several years in Kansas, Missouri, and Tennessee.

We look forward to some stimulating reviews and hopefully some fans of the book (and Ken Adams' blog on legal drafting) will chime in as well.

[JT]

June 7, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Recent Scholarship, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

We Salute Our New (Singular) Overlord

As many of you may already have noticed, Blog Emperor Paul Caron has announced a signfiicant change at the Law Professor Blogs Network, of which the ContractsProf Blog is a part.  Here is the announcment:

Law Professor Blogs LLC announces today that co-founder Paul L. Caron has purchased the 50% interest of co-founder Joseph A. Hodnicki and now owns 100% of the company.

Paul Caron:  "I will always be grateful to Joe for partnering with me nine years ago to launch TaxProf Blog and shortly thereafter the Law Professor Blogs Network. TaxProf Blog and the Law Professor Blogs Network would not exist today had Joe not partnered with me in their conception, design, and operation. I am delighted that Joe will continue to serve as the Co-Editor of Law Librarian Blog, one of the most influential law librarian blogs in the country."

Joe Hodnicki:  "When Paul and I first ventured into this web publishing space we had no idea where it might take us. It certainly has been an interesting experience for both of us as we worked to develop the Law Professor Blogs Network. The legal blogosphere has matured over the years. It is now recognized as an acceptable communications medium for law professors, something it was not when we launched the Network. While I must scale back my involvement in the Network’s affairs, by selling my interest to Paul I am confident the blogs we have published will continue to be some of the best law-related blogosphere destinations for news, analysis and commentary on the topics they address. I look forward to forthcoming Network developments under Paul’s leadership."

Law Professor Blogs LLC is the nation's only network of legal blogs edited primarily by law professors. Law Professor Blogs LLC owns and operates over 40 legal blogs, edited by over 100 law professors, law librarians and practitioners. Editors include leading scholars and educators who are committed to providing the web destination for law professors, practitioners, government and nonprofit lawyers, legal information professionals and students in their respective fields.

This blog owes its existence to Paul and Joe's vision, and both have intervened at times to help us with behind-the-scenes technical issues beyond our abilities.  The announcement reflects the fact that we are here dealing with two class acts.  

And so, thanks to Joe for all of his support over the years, and we look forward to our continued collaboration with Paul.

[JT]

May 29, 2013 in About this Blog | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 27, 2013

Boilerplate Symposium: Week 3

MjradinFor those who missed it, over the last two weeks we posted nine mini reviews of Margaret Jane Radin's Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights and the Rule of Law as well as Professor Radin's resposnes to those reviews.  

The prior posts can be found here: 

This week, we will feature posts from the following contracts scholars:

BagchiAditi Bagchi teaches Contracts and Labor Law at the Fordham University School of Law, where she is an Associate Professor. Her writing in contract theory challenges classical views of contractual obligation. For example she questions its promissory foundation (Separating Contract and PromisePromises and Permissions in Contract) and its fully voluntary character (Promises and Permissions in ContractNormative Triangulation in Contract Interpretation). She has argued that contract may be multilateral and dynamic (Parallel Contract) and has examined considerations of distributive justice in the formation, interpretation, and enforcement of contract (Distributive Injustice and Private LawManaging Moral Risk: the Case of ContractDistributive Justice and Contract). She has explored these issues with respect to employment and consumer contracts in particular (The Myth of Equality in the Employment RelationUnequal Promises, Unions and the Duty of Good Faith in Employment Contracts). Professor Bagchi also has a related interest in the comparative political economy of contract, labor, and corporate law (The Political Economy of Contract RegulationVarieties of Employee OwnershipThe Political Economy of Merger Regulation). For a full list of her publications and current projects, se her Research page.

BraucherJean Braucher is the Roger C. Henderson Professor of Law at the University of Arizona’s James E. Rogers College of Law (Tucson), where she has taught since 1998. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Arizona, Professor Braucher served as the Gustavus H. Wald Research Professor of Law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law. She has also served as a visiting professor of law at Cornell Law School, University of Texas School of Law and Boston College Law School.  Since 2007, Professor Braucher has served as the Distinguished Scholar and Chair of the Wisconsin Contracts Project of the Institute for Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin Law School. The Project is dedicated to a socio-legal approach to contract law and to revising the Contracts casebook by Stewart Macaulay et al., which Professor Braucher has joined as an author.  Prof. Braucher specializes in bankruptcy, contracts and commercial law. 

CallerosCharles Calleros is a Professor of Law at Arizona State University's Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law.  Professor Calleros’ research interests include international and comparative contract law; international conflict of laws; the intersection of free speech with race and gender discrimination; and various issues regarding legal education. At ASU, he teaches Contracts, International Contracts, Civil Rights Legislation, and Legal Method and Writing. At the Universite Paris Descartes, he annually teaches short courses in Common Law Legal Method, Comparative and International Contracts, and International Conflict of Laws.  Professor Calleros is a member of the American Law Institute.  In addition to earning several teaching awards over the years, he received the ABA’s Spirit of Excellence Award in 2011 and received an award in 2010 from the Arizona State Bar Committee on Minorities and Women in the law for his work in mentoring programs and outreach to youth in the community. Prior to joining the College faculty in 1981, he clerked for Circuit Judge Procter Hug Jr., of the U.S. Court of Appeals. Professor Calleros is past-President of Region XIV of the Hispanic National Bar Association.

LinzerPeter Linzer is a Professor of Law at the University of Houston Law Center, where he has taught since 1984.  Before going into teaching, Professor Linzer practiced law both as a Wall Street lawyer and as an Assistant Corporation Counsel for the City of New York. Professor Linzer is a member of the American Law Institute.  Professor Linzer has served as the Chair of the Contracts Section of the Association of American Law Schools and is a Board Certified civil appellate specialist. He served for nearly a decade on the Pattern Jury Charge Committee of the State Bar of Texas. His principal academic subjects include Contracts; Constitutional Law; Equal Protection; First Amendment; International Contracting; Transactional Clinic; Contract Negotiation and Drafting; Introduction to American Law (for foreign LL. M. candidates); and Torts. Working with experienced practitioners, he pioneered a transactional course in international contracting that sees students negotiate and draft documents in simulated international deals.  A list of his publications can be found here.

PrestonCheryl Preston is the Edwin M Thomas Professor of Law at Brigham Young University's J. Reuben Clark Law School, where she has taught since 1989.  Professor Preston is a nationally recognized expert in Internet contracts, the contract infancy doctrine, legal protections for minors, and Internet regulation. Professor Preston also publishes on the relationship of law and popular culture images, law and religion, and feminist legal theory. She produced an educational DVD, entitled Fashioning Women in Law. Her DVD won the prestigious Chris Award at the 2003 Columbus International Film Festival.  Prior to joining BYU's faculty, Professor Preston served as a law clerk to the Honorable Monroe G. McKay, United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit and was in private practice for ten years.  A list of her publications can be found here.

RubGuy A. Rub is an Assistant Professor at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law.  Professor Rub is an expert in the intersection between intellectual property law and economic theory. Prior to joining Moritz, he was practicing at Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP in Los Angeles.  Professor Rub has studied law on three continents. He completed his studies as an SJD candidate and received an LL.M. degree from the University of Michigan Law School; a master's degree in Law & Economics from the University of Madrid; a European Master in Law and Economics from the Erasmus University in Rotterdam, Netherlands; and a LL.B. degree from Tel-Aviv University. He was a law clerk to the Hon. Rina S. Meshel of the Tel-Aviv Appellate Court.  His recent article, Contracting Around Copyright: the Uneasy Case for Unbundling Rights in Creative Works, was published in the University of Chicago Law Review.  A list of his publiactions can be found here.

Thanks to all of our contributors.  We look forward to an exciting finale to our symposium!

[JT]

May 27, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Commentary, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

News Flash: SCOTUS Takes a Contracts Case

 

Coach seat
Coach Seat, Actual Size
We blogged about this case before.  Since that time, a panel of the Ninth Circuit issued a new opinion that is available here.  

 

You can read more about the case on SCOTUSblog, which provides this summary of the case here in a roundup of all the cases on which the Court granted Cert on the same day:

The Court agreed to decide whether airline passengers who are removed from a “frequent flyer” entitlement list have a right under state law to sue the airline for alleged violation of a promise that they could continue to enjoy the benefits.   The case of Northwest, Inc., v. Ginsberg (12-462) tests whether such legal claims are preempted by federal law governing regulation of commercial air service.

SCOTUSblog also provides this statement of the issue in the case:

Issue: Whether the court of appeals erred in holding, in contrast with the decisions of other circuits, that respondent’s implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing was not preempted under the Airline Deregulation Act because such claims are categorically unrelated to a price, route, or service, notwithstanding that respondent’s claim arises out of a frequent-flyer program (the precise context of American Airlines, Inc. v. Wolens ) and manifestly enlarged the terms of the parties’ undertakings, which allowed termination in Northwest’s sole discretion.

We are looking forward to the Supreme Court's ruling (although the tea leaves seem pretty clear), and we hope that they cite to our earlier post as (some kind of) authoirty.

[JT]

May 22, 2013 in About this Blog, Recent Cases, Travel | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 20, 2013

Boilerplate Symposium, Week 2

RadinFor those who missed it, last week we posted five responses to Margaret Jane Radin's Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights and the Rule of Law.

We heard from: 

This week, we will feature posts from the following contracts scholars:

Oren Bar-Gill is a Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Center for Law, Economics and Organization, New York University School of Law, where he has taught since 2005.  Professor Bar-Gill’s scholarship focuses on the law and economics of contracts and contracting.   Before joining the faculty at NYU, he was at Harvard University, where he was a Fellow at the Society of Fellows, as well as an Olin Fellow at Harvard Law School.  Professor Bar-Gill holds a B.A. (economics), LL.B., M.A. (law & economics) and Ph.D. (economics) from Tel-Aviv University, as well as an LL.M. and S.J.D. from Harvard Law School. Bar-Gill served in the Israeli JAG, from 1997-1999, where he participated in criminal, administrative and constitutional proceedings before various courts including the Israeli Supreme Court and the IDF Court of Appeals.  A list of his publications can be found here.  A link to our recent symposium on his book, Seduction by Contract, can be found here

BoilerplateBrian Bix is the Frederick W. Thomas Professor for the Interdisciplinary Study of Law and Language at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he has taught since 2001.  He teaches in the areas of jurisprudence, family law, and contract law. He holds a joint appointment with the Department of Philosophy.received his B.A., summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Washington University in St. Louis in 1983; his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 1986; and his D.Phil. in Law from Balliol College, Oxford University, in 1991. Professor Bix taught at Quinnipiac University School of Law, as Associate Professor (1995-1997) and Professor (1998-2001). He was a Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center during the spring semester of 2000 and at George Washington University Law School in the fall of 1999. Professor Bix was the Lecturer in Jurisprudence and Legal Reasoning at King's College, University of London, from 1991 to 1993; he taught at St. Edmund Hall, Oxford University, from 1989 to 1990. He was a law clerk for Justice Benjamin Kaplan at the Massachusetts Appeals Court (1993-95, while on leave from the King's College), and he also clerked for Judge Stephen Reinhardt, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (1987-1988), and Justice Alan Handler, New Jersey Supreme Court (1986-1987). He is a member of the American Law Institute.  A list of his publications can be found here.

Kimberly D. Krawiec is the Kathrine Robinson Everett Professor of Law at the Duke University School of Law.  She is an expert on corporate law and teaches courses on securities, corporate, and derivatives law. Her research interests span a variety of fields, including the empirical analysis of contract disputes; the choice of organizational form by professional service firms, including law firms; forbidden or taboo markets; corporate compliance systems; insider trading; derivatives hedging practices; and “rogue” trading.  Prior to joining academia, Professor Krawiec was a member of the Commodity & Derivatives Group at the New York office of Sullivan & Cromwell. She has served as a commentator for the Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative (CEELI) of the American Bar Association and on the faculty of the National Association of Securities Dealers Institute for Professional Development at the Wharton School of Business. She holds a juris doctorate from Georgetown University and a bachelor’s degree from North Carolina State University.  A visiting professor at Duke Law during the 2008-09 academic year, Krawiec also has taught law at the University of Virginia, the University of North Carolina, Harvard, and Northwestern, where she received the 1999-2000 Robert Childres Award for Teaching Excellence.  A list of her publications can be found here.

Daniel Schwarcz received his A.B. magna cum laude from Amherst College and his J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School.  After law school, Schwarcz clerked for Judge Sandra Lynch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (2003-2004), and later was an associate at Ropes & Gray in Boston, MA (2004-2005).  He served for two years as a Climenko Fellow at Harvard Law School (2005-2007) before being appointed Associate Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota School of Law in 2007.  He visited at UCLA School of Law for the Spring, 2013 semester.  Professor Schwarcz teaches insurance law, health care regulation and finance, contract law, and commercial law.  His research primarily focuses on consumer protection and regulation in property/casualty and health insurance markets.  In 2011, his article, "Reevaluating Standardized Insurance Policies," 77 University of Chicago Law Review (2011), received the Liberty Mutual Prize for an exceptional article on insurance law and regulation.  He has also published articles in The Virginia Law Review, Minnesota Law Review, North Carolina Law Review, William and Mary Law Review, and Tulane Law Review.  A full list of his publications can be found here.

We look forward to another lively week of contributions by our guest bloggers.

[JT] 

May 20, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Commentary, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 13, 2013

Boilerplate Symposium: The First Five

RadinWe begin our online symposium on Margaret Jane Radin's book, Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights and the Rule of Law with five posts this week.  This post will serve to introduce our guest bloggers.

Peter A. Alces is the Rollins Professor of Law and Cabell Research Professor of Law at the College of William & Mary School of Law, where he has taught since 1991.  He is the author of A Theory of Contract Law: Empirical Insights and Moral Psychology; Commercial ContractingThe Law of Suretyship and GuarantyBankruptcy: Cases and MaterialsCases, Problems and Materials on Payment SystemsThe Commercial Law of Intellectual PropertySales, Leases and Bulk TransfersThe Law of Fraudulent Transactions; and Uniform Commercial Code Transactions Guide. He has also published  articles in the Northwestern, Michigan, Minnesota, Illinois, North Carolina, Fordham, California, Texas, and William and Mary Law Reviews, and the Emory, Ohio State and Georgetown Law Journals. 

Theresa Amato is the executive director Citizen Works which she started with Ralph Nader in 2001. After earning her degrees from Harvard University and the New York University School of Law, where she was a Root-Tilden Scholar, Amato clerked in the Southern District of New York for the Honorable Robert W. Sweet. She was a consultant to the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (Human Rights First) and wrote an influential human rights report on child canecutters in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. She then became the youngest litigator at Public Citizen Litigation Group, where she was the Director of the Freedom of Information Clearinghouse in Washington D.C.  In 1993, Amato founded the nationally-recognized, Illinois-based Citizen Advocacy Center and served as its executive director for eight years. She currently serves as its Board President.  Most recently, she has launched Fair Contracts.org to reform the fine print in standard form contracts.  In 2009, The New Press (New York) published her book, Grand Illusion: The Myth of Voter Choice in a Two-Party Tyranny.  She also appears prominently in the Sundance-selected and Academy Awards short-listed documentary “An Unreasonable Man.”  

BoilerplateAndrew Gold is a professor of law at the Depaul University College of law.  His primary research interests address legal theory and the law of corporations. Following graduation from Duke University School of Law, he clerked with the Honorable Daniel Manion of the Seventh Circuit, and with the Honorable Loren Smith of the Court of Federal Claims. After his clerkships, he joined Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, where he practiced corporate litigation. Professor Gold's article, "A Property Theory of Contract," was lead article in the 2009 volume of the Northwestern University Law Review. His recent publications also include articles in the William and Mary, U.C. Davis, and Maryland law reviews. In 2007, Professor Gold received the College of Law's Award for Excellence in Scholarship, and, in 2010, he received the Award for Excellence in Teaching. During the 2011-2012 academic year, Professor Gold was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School, and in Fall 2011, he was an HLA Hart Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford. His scholarship has focused on contract theory; private law theory; fiduciary duties in corporate law; and Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act.

David Horton joined the UC Davis faculty in 2012, after three years at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles.  He received his B.A. cum laude from Carleton College in 1997 and his J.D. from UCLA School of Law in 2004.  At UCLA, he was elected to the Order of the Coif and served as Chief Articles Editor of the UCLA Law Review.  He then practiced at Morrison & Foerster in San Francisco and clerked for the Honorable Ronald M. Whyte of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California.  From 2007 to 2009, he taught legal research and writing at UC Berkeley School of Law.  Horton’s research focuses on wills and trusts, federal arbitration law, and contracts.  His recent work has appeared or will soon appear in the NYU Law Review, Northwestern University Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, UCLA Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, North Carolina Law ReviewUniversity of Colorado Law Review, and Virginia Law Review in Brief, among others.  He also wrote an amicus brief on behalf of contracts professors in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, the recent Supreme Court case. 

Ethan J. Leib is a noted expert in constitutional law, legislation, and contracts.  His most recent book, Friend v. Friend: Friendships and What, If Anything, the Law Should Do About Them (2011), explores the benefits of legal recognition of friendship and was published by Oxford University Press.  He has three forthcoming articles on public law subjects: one in the Journal of Political Philosophy examining fiduciary principles in political representation; one in the California Law Review applying the fiduciary principle to the activity of judging within democracies; and one in The University of Chicago Law Review exploring whether elected judges should be interpreting statutes differently from their appointed colleagues.  Leib's other academic writing has appeared in journals such as the Yale Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, UCLA Law Review, Constitutional Commentary, Election Law Journal, Journal of Legal Education, Law & Philosophy, and elsewhere.  He has also written for a broader audience in the New York Times, USA Today, SF Chronicle, Policy Review,Washington Post, New York Law Journal, The American Scholar, and The New Republic.  Before joining Fordham, Leib was a Professor of Law at the University of California–Hastings.  He has served as a Law Clerk to Chief Judge John M. Walker, Jr., of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and as an Associate at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP in New York.

We look forward to a stimulating fortnight of exchanges on this important new book.

[JT]

May 13, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Commentary, Contract Profs, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Foretaste of Our Online Symposium on Margaret Jane Radin's Boilerplate


Next week, we will begin an online sympsoium on Margaret Jane Radin's Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights and the Rule of Law.  Here is a description of the book provided by the publisher's websit

RadinBoilerplate--the fine-print terms and conditions that we become subject to when we click "I agree" online, rent an apartment, enter an employment contract, sign up for a cellphone carrier, or buy travel tickets--pervades all aspects of our modern lives. On a daily basis, most of us accept boilerplate provisions without realizing that should a dispute arise about a purchased good or service, the nonnegotiable boilerplate terms can deprive us of our right to jury trial and relieve providers of responsibility for harm. Boilerplate is the first comprehensive treatment of the problems posed by the increasing use of these terms, demonstrating how their use has degraded traditional notions of consent, agreement, and contract, and sacrificed core rights whose loss threatens the democratic order.

Margaret Jane Radin examines attempts to justify the use of boilerplate provisions by claiming either that recipients freely consent to them or that economic efficiency demands them, and she finds these justifications wanting. She argues, moreover, that our courts, legislatures, and regulatory agencies have fallen short in their evaluation and oversight of the use of boilerplate clauses. To improve legal evaluation of boilerplate, Radin offers a new analytical framework, one that takes into account the Ben-Shahar, Omrinature of the rights affected, the quality of the recipient's consent, and the extent of the use of these terms. Radin goes on to offer possibilities for new methods of boilerplate evaluation and control, among them the bold suggestion that tort law rather than contract law provides a preferable analysis for some boilerplate schemes. She concludes by discussing positive steps that NGOs, legislators, regulators, courts, and scholars could take to bring about better practices

But before we kick off the symposium, we have a timely new review of the book from Omri Ben-Shahar (pictured) that is forthcoming in the Michigan Law Review.  The review is entitled Regulation through Boilerplate: An Apologia, and here is a description from SSRN:

This essay reviews Margaret Jane Radin’s Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights, And The Rule Of Law (Princeton Press, 2013). It responds to two of the book’s principal complaints against boilerplate consumer contracts: that they modify people’s rights without true agreement to, or even minimal knowledge of, their terms; and that the provisions they unilaterally enact are substantively intolerable. I argue, counter-intuitively, that contracts with long fine prints are no more complex and baffling to consumers than any alternative boilerplate-free templates of contracting. Therefore, there is no alternative universe in which consumers enter simpler contracts better informed of the legal terms. In addition, I argue that any policy that mandates consumer-friendlier arrangements (such as ones that eliminate boilerplate arbitration clauses, warranty disclaimers, or data collection) would hurt consumers in an unintended but potentially costly way.

[JT]

May 9, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)