ContractsProf Blog

Editor: D. A. Jeremy Telman
Valparaiso Univ. Law School

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The ContractsProf Blog Welcomes Mirror of Justice to the LPBN Family

LPBNAs Blog Emperor Paul Caron announced here on the Mother of All Blawgs, the TaxProf Blog, Mirror of Justice, a blog dedicated to the development of Catholic legal theory edited by Rick Garnett (Notre Dame) and 19 other prominent law professors of faith, has joined the Law Professor Blogs Network.  

Rick Garnett announced the move on MoJ here.

We are delighted to welcome this well-established and tremendously interesting blog to the LPBN family, and we marvel at Paul's remarkably expanding empire.

July 24, 2014 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, July 4, 2014

Follow-up on Nancy Kim's Post about Facebook's Creepy Experiment

Michelle-meyerMichelle Meyer (pictured) has a very detailed post on this subject over at The Faculty Lounge.  Her approach is different from Nancy's, focusing narrowly (but thoroughly) on the question of whether an Institutional Review Board (IRB) could have approved the FB experiment. There Meyer arrives at a different conclusion than I think Nancy would arrive at.  Meyer thinks an IRB could have and should have approved the FB experiment based on informed consent (although she recognizes that one could dispute whether such consent was actually present), and Nancy, I think correctly, questions whether there are very strong arguments that FB users knowingly agreed to this kind of experiment when they agreed to FB's terms.  

July 4, 2014 in About this Blog, Web/Tech, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

REFinBlog Joins the Law Professor Blogs Network

LPBNAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Law Professor Blogs Network has added another member to its roster.  The REFinBlog began in November 2012 and it is edited by Brad Borden (Brooklyn) and David Reiss (Brooklyn).  The blog tracks developments in the real estate finance industry.  

We welcome REFinBlog to the LPBN family and as always wish the contributors to our new sibling happy blogging. 

May 28, 2014 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, May 18, 2014

More on the Structure of Cable Contracts

By Myanna Dellinger

Recently, Jeremy Telman blogged here about the insanity of having to pay for hundreds of TV stations when one really only wants to, or has time to, watch a few. 

Luckily, change may finally be on its way.  The company Aereo is offering about 30 channels of network programming on, so far, computers or mobile devices using cloud technology.  The price?  About $10 a month, surely a dream for “cable cutters” in the areas which Aereo currently serves. 

How does this work?  Each customer gets their own tiny Aereo antenna instead of having to either have a large, unsightly antenna on their roofs or buying expensive cable services just to get broadcast stations.  In other words, Aereo enables its subscribers to watch broadcast TV on modern, mobile devices at low cost and with relative technological ease.  In other words, Aereo records show for its subscribers so that they don’t have to. 

That sounds great, right?  Not if you are the big broadcast companies in fear of losing millions or billions of dollars (from the revenue they get via cable companies that carry their shows).  They claim that this is a loophole in the law that allows private users to record shows for their own private use, but not for companies to do so for commercial gain and copyright infringement.

Of course, the great American tradition of filing suit was followed.  Most judges have sided with Aero so far, the networks have filed petition for review with the United States Supreme Court, which granted the petition in January.

Stay tuned for the outcome in this case…

May 18, 2014 in About this Blog, Commentary, Current Affairs, E-commerce, Famous Cases, In the News, Recent Cases, Television, True Contracts, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Two New Additions to the Law Professor Blogs Network

LPBNFirst, as announced on the TaxProf Blog hereThe Right Coast, edited by Thomas A. Smith (San Diego), has joined the Law Professor Blogs Network.  

Second, as announced on the TaxProf Blog here, the Law Professor Blogs Network is thrilled to announce the launch of Clinical Law Prof Blog, edited by Jeff Baker (Pepperdine) with these contributing editors:

  • Bryan Adamson (Seattle)
  • Kim Bart (Duke)
  • Kelly Behre (UC-Davis)
  • Warren Binford (Willamette)
  • Kristina Campbell (UDC)
  • Tanya Cooper (Alabama)
  • Meta Copeland (Mississippi College)
  • Jill Engle (Penn State)
  • Carrie Hagan (Indiana)
  • D’lorah Hughes (Arkansas (Fayetteville))
  • Robert Lancaster (LSU)
  • Inga Laurent (Gonzaga)
  • Kelly McTear (Faulkner)
  • Kelly Olson (Arkansas (Little Rock))
  • Brittany Stringfellow Otey (Pepperdine)
  • Danny Schaffzin (Memphis)
  • Kelly Terry (Arkansas (Little Rock))
  • Virgil Wiebe (St. Thomas)

From Jeff's inaugural post:

We hope to amplify and magnify the work of clinical law professors, to share resources and ideas and to collaborate with our colleagues online and in social media who are serving our community.  We write to advance the twin causes of good teaching and justice.   

Welcome, and happy blogging.

April 24, 2014 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 14, 2014

We're #35! Readership up 80%

Upward chartSix months ago, we reported that our blog is ranked #41 in the top 50 law blogs (or blawgs) and that we had experienced a healthy 9% growth in our readership over the previous 12-month period.

Today, Paul Caron announced on the TaxProf Blog that we have climbed to #35, with a 79.9% increase in our readership.  

Thanks to all of our contributors and to our readers.  We hope the upward trend continues.

April 14, 2014 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 24, 2014

Law Professors Blog Network Welcomes Four New Blogs to the Roster

LPBNAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blogs Network, the latter is thrilled to announce the launch of four new blogs:

  • Comparative Law Prof Blog, edited by Shawn Marie Boyne (Indiana), Monica Eppinger (Saint Louis), Lissa Griffin (Pace) & Shitong Qiao (NYU)
  • Human Rights At Home Blog, edited by Martha F. Davis (Northeastern) & Margaret Drew (Northeastern)
  • Law and Economics Prof Blog, edited by Gerrit De Geest (Washington U.), Ben Depoorter (UC-Hastings), Brian Galle (Boston College), David Gamage (UC-Berkeley), Shi-Ling Hsu (Florida State), Murat C. Mungan (Florida State), Eric Rasmusen (Indiana) & Manuel A. Utset, Jr. (Florida State)
  • Legislation Law Prof Blog, edited by Kevin Barry (Quinnipiac), Emily Benfer (Loyola-Chicago), Sara K. Rankin (Seattle) & Joel Rogers (Wisconsin)

To all the new start-ups, we say: Welcome and we look forward to your posts.

March 24, 2014 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Nutrition Labels and "Natural" Foods

As a follow-up on Nancy's post from last week on Nutrition Labels and Wrap Contracts, I would like to call attention to a new paper posted on SSRN by my colleague Nicole Negowetti (pictured).  The paper is called Defining "Natural" Foods: The Search for a "Natural" Law, and here is the abstract:

NegowettiBecause the FDA has refused to codify a uniform or enforceable definition of “natural” food, each food manufacturer determines its own standard for the term. Unlike the certified organic label, no government agency, certification group, or other independent entity ensures that “natural” claims have merit. Generally, the term “natural” means that a food has been minimally processed, contains no artificial ingredients or preservatives, is healthy and wholesome. However, food producers are not prohibited by law from using pesticides, genetically modified crops, fumigants, solvents, and toxic processing aids. Consumers and food producers are both disadvantaged by the inconsistent meanings and uses of the term. Recent surveys demonstrate that while consumers demand “natural” products, they are confused regarding the term’s meaning. A proliferation of consumer protection lawsuits against food producers has flooded the courts over the past two years. Food producers truly committed to producing “natural” products are competing with manufacturers who loosely interpret the term, produce and sell cheaper, inferior, and not-so-“natural” products. In light of the FDA’s reluctance to codify a “natural” definition, this Article will evaluate the recent decisions in the “natural” lawsuits and the attempts by courts, legislatures, the food industry, and retailers to establish a “natural” standard. The Article concludes that the search for an enforceable and comprehensive “natural” standard is futile. It predicts that the term “natural” has proven to be so confusing to consumers that the significance of the term has likely been diluted. Furthermore, because the claim has been so legally troublesome for food manufacturers, use of “natural” on food labels will surely be on the decline.

 

March 5, 2014 in About this Blog, Food and Drink, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 14, 2014

Thank You For Your Patience

We at the ContractsProf appreciate your readership.  Unfortunately, all of our bloggers are occupied at this time binging on Season 2 of House of Cards.  Readers may stare at their screens, visit the TaxProf Blog or any other blog on the Law Professor Blog Network, or pass Valentine's Day by doing whatever it takes to get a free crib from Ikea (hat tip to Rachel Arnow-Richman).

Test Pattern

We will resume blogging shortly.  

Thank you for your patience. 

February 14, 2014 in About this Blog, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The Behavioral Economics of Tipping

Myanna's post about Uber got me thinking about a recent trip to New York City.  New York City was the first city in which I took the occasional cab.  I went to college and to law school there.  When I was in college, some kindly relative told me that cabbies should get a 10% tip, and I have lived by that ever since.  Turns out my kindly relative was a cheapskate. 

As this article from The New York Times from about a year ago indicates, as early as 1947, cabbies expected at least 12½%, and until recently average tips exceeded 20%.  Tips have come down as fares have gone up, and as of a year ago they averaged just over 15%.   

New York City cabs are now equipped with credit card readers that offer riders the option to leave a tip.  The reader will automatically add a tip, and it gives riders the option of tipping 15%, 20% or 25%.  Behavioral economics suggests that most people will choose the middle one, and so it seems that the aim of the screen is to get cabbies' tips back up to where they were before the fares increased.  When I saw these three options, I felt oppressed and manipulated, since I was still operating on the assumption that 10% is what is expected.  Now I feel guilty that I did not tip more reasonably.  In my own defense, I didn't save myself any money, since the my law school reimbursed me for my travel expenses on that trip.  So you see, I wasn't being cheap; I was being a responsible steward of my law school's resources.  But no more stingy tips for me. 

I am a work in progress.  I was as astonished as was Jerry Seinfeld (the character) to learn that chambermaids expect $5 a night (see the scene below, starting about 1:40 in).  

 

Ann Landers is an even bigger cheapsake than my relative.  Before we saw this, I would tip $2 a night, and I still think $5 a night is rather high.  After all, Jerry Seinfeld (the character) is an experienced traveler, and he seems pretty free with his money.  If he gives $1, $2 seems okay.  But my wife and daughter agree with the suspected serial killer.  Five dollars it is.  It would have been interesting to see if chambermaids noticed an increase in generosity following the airing of this episode.  And I wonder if they now wish that cable channels would stop showing Seinfeld reruns.  The episode is now at least fifteen years old, so if $5 a night was a good tip then, one should expect $10 /a night now. 

January 28, 2014 in About this Blog, Commentary, Travel | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 13, 2014

A New Look for the Blog

Long-time readers may notice that we now have by-lines.  This is a product of our editor finally getting around to providing our contributing editors with their own individualized log-ins.  So, no more hunting around at the bottom of posts for an abbreviated by-line.  

January 13, 2014 in About this Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Law Professor Blogs Network Is Going Gangbusters

LPBNAs noted here on the TaxProf Blog, the mother of all LPBN Blogs, the Law Professor Blogs Network enjoyed a record-setting 2013, with traffic up 87.5% over 2012 as total network page views topped 18 million.  Eighteen of the network's blogs are among the 50 most popular blogs edited by law professors.  Four network blogs were named to the ABA Blawg 100 ("the 100 best Web sites by lawyers, for lawyers, as chosen by the editors of the ABA Journal"), and one network blog was named to the ABA Blawg 100 Hall of Fame.

 Brian Leiter's Law School Reports and Law School Rankings joined the network in October.  The network launched nine new blogs in 2013:

[JT]

January 8, 2014 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 2, 2013

Introducing Global K: Periodic Contributions from Michael P. Malloy

MPMbykloss-2We are delighted to introduce the latest of our new contributors, Michael P. Malloy (pictured), Distinguished Professor of Law of the University at the Pacific's McGeorge School of Law.  Professor Malloy's posts will generally fall into the rubric "Global K" and will concentrate mainly on transnational contract law, including but not limited to CISG developments (e.g., cases, accessions, interpretations, secondary literature). 

An internationally recognized expert on bank regulation and on economic sanctions, Michael P. Malloy received his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. from Georgetown University. SEC enforcer, bank regulator, economic sanctions architect, Dr. Malloy has authored or edited over 100 books and book-length supplements. He is the co-author of Global Issues in Contract Law (West 2007), and the author of Anatomy of a Meltdown (Aspen 2010), a study of the current global financial crisis. 

A listing of Professor Malloy's representative publications can be found here.

A more detailed biography can be found here.

[JT]

December 2, 2013 in About this Blog, Contract Profs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, November 21, 2013

More New Blood

DellingerStarting next week, we will add Myanna F. Dellinger (pictured), an Associate Professor at Western State College of Law and Director of the Institute for Global Law and Policy, to our roster of contributors.  

After a successful first career in international communications and university instruction on two continents, Professor Dellinger graduated from law school at the top of her class at the University of Oregon School of Law (Order of the Coif). While in law school, she interned for the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change. After law school, she clerked for the late Hon. Francis J. D'Eramo of the Superior Court of the United States Virgin Islands and for the Hon. Procter Hug, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  She teaches Contracts Law and Sales.  She writes extensively on international law with a particular focus on climate change.  She has visited 33 nations for business and pleasure.

A sampling of Professor Dellinger's scholarly writings can be found on SSRN.  

We look forward to Professor Dellinger's contributions.

[JT]

November 21, 2013 in About this Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

We Welcome the Appellate Advocacy Blog to the Law Professor Blog Network

ClevelandAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blogs Network, the latter welcomes to its family the Appellate Advocacy Blog edited by David R. Cleveland (Valparaiso), Kendall D. Isaac(Appalachian), Tonya Kowalski (Washburn), and Todd Bruno (Charleston).

It brings us especial pleasure to welcome this blog to the Network because my colleague, David Cleveland (pictured), is a founding editor.  Soon the Valpo Blog Network will rival Paul Caron's Blog Empire. 

From the inaugural post:

Welcome to the Appellate Advocacy Blog on the Law Professor Blogs Network. On this blog, we plan to address a wide variety of issues related to appellate justice. This includes appellate court advocacy and practice, principles of appellate justice, appellate court jurisprudence on current issues, and legislative developments affecting the courts. We hope to keep our readers informed about cases and issues on appeal as well as scholarship, research, conferences, and news related to appellate courts. Our interest is in appellate advocacy and justice, broadly conceived, including state, federal, tribal, and international appellate courts. We hope that this blog will provide useful information, interesting perspectives, and fodder for engaging discussions.

We look forward to your posts.

[JT]

November 21, 2013 in About this Blog, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, November 17, 2013

Introducing our Virtual Symposium: Nancy Kim's Wrap Contracts

KimThe symposium marks the publication of Nancy Kim's Wrap Contracts: Foundations and Ramifications (Oxford UP 2013).   Next wek, this blog will publish posts by experts from around the country commenting on Nancy's work.  Here is Oxford's bullet point summary of the book's virtues:

  • Explains why wrap contracts were created, how they have developed, and what this means for society
  • Uses hypotheticals, cases, and real world examples
  • Discusses court decisions with summary critiques
  • Provides doctrinal solutions grounded in law and policy
  • Defines and distinguishes different types of contract terms
  • Includes actual wrap contract terms, flow charts, checklists and other visual aids to explain legal concepts

The following people will be adding their own thoughts and comments on the blog next week:

CaloRyanRyan Calo is an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law.  He researches the intersection of law and emerging technology, with an emphasis on robotics and the Internet. His work on drones, driverless cars, privacy, and other topics has appeared in law reviews and major news outlets, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and National Public Radio. Professor Calo has also testified before the full Judiciary Committee of the United States Senate.

Professor Calo serves on numerous advisory boards, including the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the Future of Privacy Forum, and National Robotics Week. Professor Calo co-chairs the Robotics and Artificial Intelligence committee of the American Bar Association and is a member of the Executive Committee of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS) Section on Internet and Computer Law. 

Professor Calo previously served as a director at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society (CIS) where he remains an Affiliate Scholar. He also worked as an associate in the Washington, D.C. office of Covington & Burling LLP and clerked for the Honorable R. Guy Cole on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Prior to law school at the University of Michigan, Professor Calo investigated allegations of police misconduct in New York City.

You can read Professor Calo's work on SSRN and follow him on Twitter.

CherryMiriam A. Cherry is a visiting professor at the University of Missouri School of Law and a tneured professor law at Saint Louis University. Her scholarship is interdisciplinary and focuses on the intersection of technology and globalization with business, contract and employment law topics. In her recent work, Professor Cherry analyzes crowdfunding, markets for corporate social responsibility, virtual work and social entrepreneurship. Her articles will appear or have appeared in the Northwestern Law ReviewMinnesota Law ReviewWashington Law ReviewIllinois Law Review,Georgia Law ReviewAlabama Law Review, Maryland Law Review, and the Tulane Law Review, and U.C. Davis Law Review, among others. 

Professor Cherry attended Dartmouth College and Harvard Law School, where she was a research assistant to Professor Martha Minow, the present dean. After graduation from law school, she clerked for Justice Roderick Ireland of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and then for Judge Gerald Heaney of the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. In 2001, a transition to the private sector took Professor Cherry to the Boston firm of Foley Hoag LLP, where she practiced corporate law with an emphasis on mergers and acquisitions, securities compliance filings, venture capital and private debt financing. She was also associated with the firm of Berman, DeValerio & Pease, where she was involved in litigating several accounting fraud cases including those against former telecom giant WorldCom and Symbol Technologies, which resulted in a $139 million settlement.

Professor Cherry has been on the faculty or visited at a number of law schools, including the University of Georgia, University of the Pacific-McGeorge School of Law and Cumberland School of Law. In 2008, she was elected a member of the American Law Institute.

You can read some of Professor Cherry's scholarship on SSRN.

WhartzogWoodrow Hartzog is an Assistant Professor at Samford University's Cumberland School of Law, which he has taught since 2011. Professor Hartzog writes in the area of privacy law, online communication, human-computer interaction, robotics, and contracts. His work has been or is scheduled to be published in scholarly publications such as the Columbia Law Review, California Law Review, and Michigan Law Review and popular publications such as The Atlantic and The Nation.

Before joining the faculty at Cumberland, Professor Hartzog worked as a trademark attorney at the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Virginia and as an associate attorney at Burr & Forman LLP in Birmingham, Alabama. He has also served as a clerk for the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington D.C. and was a Roy H. Park Fellow at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Professor Hartzog holds a Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an LL.M. in intellectual property from the George Washington University Law School, a J.D. from the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, and a B.A. from Samford University. He is an Affiliate Scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

Recent and Forthcoming publications include:

The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy, 114 COLUMBIA LAW REVIEW (forthcoming 2014) (with Daniel J. Solove).

Reviving Implied Confidentiality, 89 INDIANA LAW JOURNAL (forthcoming 2014).

Social Data, 74 OHIO STATE LAW JOURNAL (forthcoming 2013) (symposium).

Obscurity by Design, 88 WASHINGTON LAW REVIEW 385 (2013) (with Fred Stutzman) (symposium).

The Fight to Frame Privacy, 111 MICHIGAN LAW REVIEW 1021 (2013) (book review).

The Case for Online Obscurity, 101 CALIFORNIA LAW REVIEW 1 (2013) (with Fred Stutzman).

Chain-Link Confidentiality, 46 GEORGIA LAW REVIEW 657 (2012) (symposium).

Morigiello_9970 (1)Juliet Moringiello is a Professor at Widener University School of Law, where she regularly teaches Property, Sales, Secured Transactions, and Bankruptcy, and has taught seminars on Cities in Crisis and Electronic Commerce. From 2004 – 2010, she was the co-author, with William L. Reynolds, of the annual survey of electronic contracting law published in The Business Lawyer. She has recently published articles in the Maryland Law Review, the Wisconsin Law Review, the Fordham Law Review, and the Tulane Law Review. Prof. Moringiello has held several leadership positions in the American Bar Association Business Law Section, most recently in its Cyberspace Law Committee, and she is co-chair of the Uniform Commercial Code Committee of the Pennsylvania Bar Association Business Law Section. 

Recent Publications Include:

MrustadMichael Rustad is the Thomas F. Lambert, Jr. Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Intellectual Property Law Concentration at Suffolk University Law School. He has authored numerous books and articles, including In Defense of Tort Law that he coauthored with Thomas Koenig. His current books are titled Software Licensing: Principles & Practical Strategies (2013) and Global Internet Law in a Nutshell (2013).  Among his recently published articles are “Reconceptualizing Consumer Terms of Use for A Globalized Knowledge Economy” (2012) with Vittoria Onufrio, and “Reconceptualizing the BP Oil Spill as Parens Patriae Products Liability” (2012) with Thomas H. Koenig.  He is writing the first hornbook on Global Internet Law for West Publishing Company.  Professor Rustad received his PhD from Boston College, his JD from Suffolk University and his LLM from Harvard University.

Recent Publications Include:

  • SOFTWARE LICENSES: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICAL STRATEGIES (Oxford University Press, 2d ed., forthcoming 2013 ) 
  • GLOBAL INTERNET LAW (HORNBOOK SERIES) (forthcoming 2013 ) 

ZacksEric Zacks  is an assistant professor of law at Wayne State University Law School. His recent scholarship focuses on the relevance of behavioral sciences to contract formation, breach, and enforcement. His work has been published in the University of Cincinnati Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business Law, and the Penn State Law Review, and his forthcoming article, Shame, Regret, and Contract Design, will be published in the Marquette Law Review. 

In 2012 and 2013, Professor Zacks was voted Professor of the Year by the second- and third-year law students at Wayne. He teaches a variety of business law courses, including Corporate Finance, Mergers and Acquisitions, Securities Regulation, and Corporations, as well as a first-year Contracts course. 

Prior to joining Wayne State, Professor Zacks was a partner in the corporate and securities department of Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP, a Detroit law firm, with a practice focus on complex acquisitions and divestitures, debt and equity financings, and other aspects of corporate transactions. He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School and his B.A., with high distinction, from the University of Michigan.

Recent Publications Include:

  • "Shame, Regret, and Contract Design," 97 Marq. L. Rev. __ (forthcoming, 2013)
  • "Contracting Blame," 15 U. Pa. J. Bus. L.. 169 (2012)
  • "Unstacking the Deck? Contract Manipulation and Credit Card Accountability,"78 U. Cin. L. Rev. 1471 (2011)
  • "Dismissing the Class: A Practical Approach to the Class Action Restriction on the Legal Services Corporation," 110 Penn St. L. Rev. 1 (2005) (with Joshua D. Blank) reprinted in Class Action Litigation and Limitations (Icfai University Press, 2008).

[JT]

November 17, 2013 in About this Blog, Books, Contract Profs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Securities Law Blog Joins the Law Professor Blog Network

LPBNAs announced here on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blog Network, of which this blog is a proud member, the Securities Law Prof Blog, edited by Eic Chaffee (Toledo) has been re-launched. From the inaugural post:

The Securities Law Prof Blog has always been one of my favorite blogs because of its comprehensive coverage of an area of the law that I love. A few weeks ago, I spoke with Barbara Black at the Ohio Securities Conference, an event at which we were both presenting. She mentioned that she had decided to step away from the Blog to concentrate on her list of numerous other projects. After contacting Paul Caron, I now find myself in the editor's chair. Over the months to come, I look forward to building the Blog into a comprehensive resource for those interested in securities regulation.

We welcome a new member to the family and congratulate Paul Caron on the continued expansion of his Blog Empire.  

[JT]

 

November 14, 2013 in About this Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, November 11, 2013

New Blood

The ContractsProf Blog is delighted to welcome the following new contributors!

ChingProfessor Kenneth Ching (left)  joined the faculty of the Regent University School of Law in 2011 and teaches Contracts and UCC 1. He was selected as the 2011-2012 1L Professor of the Year and the 2013 Law Faculty Scholar of the Year. Professor Ching’s scholarship focuses on legal theory. He has also published creative essays, poetry, and fiction.

Prior to teaching, Professor Ching practiced law in the areas of commercial litigation, trusts and estates litigation, and employment law. He has also litigated constitutional law issues. 

His publications include:

Roberts on Obamacare: Liar, Lunatic or Legitimate?, J.L. & Pol. (forthcoming).

Would Jesus Kill Hitler? Bonhoeffer, Church, and State, Geo. J.L. & Pub. Pol'y (forthcoming).

Methodological Versus Naturalistic Legal Objectivity, 57 St. Louis U. L.J. 59 (2012).

Daniel and the Noise, Storyglossia, Issue 22 (2007).

Harrison_bigJeffrey L. Harrison (right) holds the Stephen C. O'Connell Chair at the University of Florida's Levin School of Law, where he has taught since 1983.  He previously taught law at the University of Houston and economics at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro.  He has held visiting position of the Universite du Pantheon-Sorbonne, the University of Texas, Leiden University and the University of North Carolina.  Professor Harrison is the author of about a dozen books on monopsony, antitrust law, commercial regulation and deregulation and law and economics, as well as dozens of articles on everything from socioeconomic theory to French New Wave cinema.  

Some of Professor Harrison's work is available on SSRN.

We welcome you both to the blog, and we look forward to seeing your posts!

Stay tuned, readers, we expect to introduce a few more new contributors in the coming weeks.

[JT]

November 11, 2013 in About this Blog, Contract Profs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 28, 2013

We Welcome Brian Leiter Back to the Law Professor Blog Network

LeiterAs announced on the TaxProf Blog, the Mother Ship of the Law Professor Blog Network, of which this blog is a proud member, Leiter's Law School Reports and Leiter's Law School Rankings Join Law Professor Blogs Network.

Brian was part of the network in 2005-09, and he and Blog Emperor Paul Caron had a chance to reconnect over dinner when he came to Pepperdine ten days ago to deliver a lecture sponsored by the Glazer Institute for Jewish Studies on his book Why Tolerate Religion?(Princeton University Press, 2012).

We join Paul in welcoming Brian Leiter's Law School Reports and Brian Leiter's Law School Rankings back to the Law Professors Blogs Network.  

[JT]

 

October 28, 2013 in About this Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

We're #41!

GraphAs reported here on the TaxProf Blog, our blog broke into the Top 50 blogs edited by law professors for the most recent 12-month period (Oct. 1, 2012 - Sept. 30, 2013).  We had just over 168,000 page views over the period, a 9.4% increase over the previous twelve-month period.  

Thanks for viewing!

[JT]

October 22, 2013 in About this Blog | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)