ContractsProf Blog

Editor: Myanna Dellinger
University of South Dakota School of Law

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Desperate times for law schools

As widely reported elsewhere such as by  David Frakt in The Faculty Lounge, law schools seem to be turning desperate to hide their student recruiting practices and ABA communications (see, e.g., Desperation Times at Thomas Cooley).  That blog post was cited to by the ABA in its brief in opposition to a motion filed by the Cooley law school for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction in an attempt to prevent the ABA from publishing a letter online stating Cooley's noncompliance with at least one accreditation standard. Images

Of course, law students choosing to attend law school execute legally binding contracts with their schools.  So do employees choosing to work for these schools, many of which seem to be on the brink of discontinuation of operations.  For how much longer can we as law schools continue defending _not_ telling applicants the real truth about their prospects for passing the bar given our applicants' LSAT scores which are, we have to admit, highly determinative in predicting ultimate bar passage rates?  Is what we do ethical and professional?  Do we even follow contract laws against fraud in the inducement, or torts fraud laws, when we as schools have information that could and likely is crucial to applicants' decision-making?

David Frakt developed what he calls a "risk band" that correlates LSAT scores and students' risk of failing the bar.  Taking that even further, shouldn't applicants be told their _individual_, percent-wise chance of passing the bar?  If, for example, students know that with an LSAT score of 143 (this is just a random example), they have virtually zero chance of passing the bar, would they still execute a three-year contract with a law school that may cost them upward of $100,000?  I doubt it.  More honesty and transparency is clearly required in both the law school hiring and admissions world.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/contractsprof_blog/2017/11/desperate-times-for-law-schools.html

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