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Valparaiso Univ. Law School

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Monday, July 22, 2013

Unjust Enrichment in South African Law: A Special Price for Our Readers

Hart Publishing has asked us to share the following book announcement with our readers:

Scott BookUnjust Enrichment in South African Law 

Rethinking Enrichment by Transfer

By Helen Scott

 Conventional thinking teaches that the absence of liability-in particular contractual invalidity - is itself the reason for the restitution of transfers in the South African law of unjustified enrichment. However, this book argues that while the absence of a relationship of indebtedness is a necessary condition for restitution in such cases, it is not a sufficient condition. The book takes as its focus those instances in which the invalidity thesis is strongest, namely, those traditionally classified as instances of the condictio indebiti, the claim to recover undue transfers. It seeks to demonstrate that in all such instances it is necessary for the plaintiff to show not only the absence of his liability to transfer but also a specific reason for restitution, such as mistake, compulsion or incapacity. Furthermore, this book explores the reasons for the rise of unjust factors in South African law, attributing this development in part to the influence of the Roman-Dutch restitutio in integrum, an extraordinary, equitable remedy that has historically operated independently of the established enrichment remedies of the civilian tradition, and which even now remains imperfectly integrated into the substantive law of enrichment. Finally, the book seeks to defend in principled terms the mixed approach to enrichment by transfer (an approach based both on unjust factors and on the absence of a legal ground) which appears to characterise modern South African law. It advocates the rationalisation of the causes of action comprised within the condictio indebiti, many of which are subject to additional historically-determined requirements, in light of this mixed analysis.

The Author

Helen Scott is an Associate Professor in the Department of Private Law at the University of Cape Town. 

July  2013   250pp   Hbk   9781849462235 

RSP: £55 / €71.50  / US$110

20% DISCOUNT PRICE: £44 / €57.20 / US $88

Order Online in the US 

If you would like to place an order you can do so through the Hart Publishing website (link below). To receive the discount please mention ref:‘CONTRACTSPROFBLOG in the special instructions field. Please note that the discount will not be shown on your order but will be applied when your order is processed.

US website: http://www.hartpublishingusa.com/books/details.asp?ISBN=9781849462235

Order Online in the UK, EU and Rest of World

If you would like to place an order you can do so through the Hart Publishing website (link below). To receive the discount please type the reference‘CONTRACTSPROFBLOG’ in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’.

UK, EU and ROW website: http://www.hartpub.co.uk/BookDetails.aspx?ISBN=9781849462235

 If you have any questions please contact Hart Publishing

 Hart Publishing Ltd, 16C Worcester Place, Oxford, OX1 2JW

Telephone Number: 01865 517 530

Fax Number: 01865 510 710

Website: http://www.hartpub.co.uk

Hart Publishing Ltd. is registered in England No. 3307205

[JT]

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