ContractsProf Blog

Editor: D. A. Jeremy Telman
Valparaiso Univ. Law School

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Friday, January 20, 2012

Contracts Issues in the Costa Concordia Wreck

Cruise ShipWhen I was a teenager, I used to read Mad Magazine (when I wasn't reading Dostoevsky, Kafka or Sartre, of course).  I retain very few memories of my childhood, but one Mad feature stuck with me, although only vaguely.  The idea was to take a story and present it as it would be presented in magazines with very different perspectives on the world.  The story that Mad worked with was a football game, so of course one version was just to report on the game.  Another version was a medical journal featuring an image of some bone that had been broken during the game.  Another version that I remember distinctly featured a photograph of a football taken at very close range.  The image was supposed to represent how the football game would be featured in a photography magazine.  It described all of the particulars of the way the photograph was taken -- film speed, lens type, etc., and then mentioned that the photograph was of the ball as it soared through the uprights for the winning field goal, just before it smashed the photographer's camera.  A nice touch, in the estimation of my 13-year-old mind.  

I've often thought that this blog plays out Mad Magazine's idea, as do many other blogs and even the lamestream media.  And so, we pick over the carcass of a human and environmental catastrophe for a tidbit of contracts doctrine.  But we are not alone.  As the New York Times reported yesterday, it will be very difficult for any victims of the Costa Concordia wreck to go after the ship's corporate parent, Carnival Cruise Lines, for reasons that will strike a chord with fans of the civil procedure chestnut, Carninval Cruise Lines, Inc. v. Shute.

According to the Times, at least 70 passengers of the ill-fated cruise ship have signed on to a class-action lawsuit, but their ability to get at the corporate defendant will be greatly hindered by the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims, characterized on the International Maritime Organization Website as “a virtually unbreakable system of limiting liability," and by the terms contained in the 6,400-word contracts attached to their cruise tickets. 

The contract could provide great fodder for a few sessions on contractual remedies.

[JT]

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