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Valparaiso Univ. Law School

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Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Today in History -- November 17

1558 – Queen Mary I of England dies and is succeeded by her half-sister Elizabeth, with very unfortunate results for Catholics.

1777 – The Articles of Confederation are submitted to the thirteen united American colonies for ratification.

1800 – The United States Congress holds its first session in Washington, D.C. No one’s life, liberty, or property will ever be safe again.

1908RandallCountyCourthouseCanyonTexas907TJnsn 1869 – The Suez Canal opens, linking the Mediterranean and Red Seas, and ultimately giving rise to the group of great commercial impracticability cases known as the Suez Canal Cases, including Ocean Tramp Tankers Corp. v. V/O Sovfracht (The Eugenia), [1964] 2 Q.B. 226.

1871 – Lawyer George Wood Wingate and publisher William Conant Church obtain a New York charter for a group that will later become the National Rifle Association. Its first president is former General Ambrose Burnside..

1947 – Under the leadership of Ronald Reagan, the largest labor union in the acting field, the Screen Actors Guild, votes to require officers to swear they are not members of the Communist Party. This vote is regarded by many as more evil than anything Stalin ever did.

1947 – Scientists at Bell Laboratories, trying to figure out why an amplifier isn’t working as it should, make observations that will ultimately lead to the development of the transistor.

2004 – Kmart Corp. announces that it is buying Sears, Roebuck and Co. for $11 billion and naming the newly merged company Sears Holdings Corporation.

FGS

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