Friday, March 14, 2014

Daily Read: Media Coverage in the Pistorius Trial

The high profile trial of Oscar Pistorius may be South Africa's "OJ Simpson moment." Although there are certainly differences - - - Pistorius admits he fired the gunshots that killed his partner, Reeva Steenkamp; his defense is that he thought she was an intruder - - -  the televised trials and intense media interest are similar.

Yet the South African judge has had to contend with the question of how much graphic material to allow.

Over at Constitutionally Speaking, Pierre De Vos confronts the issues.  The original decision was to "grant permission to media houses to broadcast the Oscar Pistorius murder trial live on radio and television."  But then during the trial, there was a "ruling by Judge Masipa to ban live tweeting of the evidence of the pathologist, apparently to protect the sensibilities of the family of the deceased due to the potential graphic nature of the evidence" was "at best ill-advised."  Indeed, the judge later reversed  his own "decision to prohibit live tweeting of the pathologist’s evidence," but continued to ban the audio or audio-visual broadcasting of the pathologist's "testimony due to the possible graphic nature of the evidence."

399px-Oscar_Pistorius_2_Daegu_2011

Amy Davidson, writing on the New Yorker Blog,  provides journalist context to the testimony in question; testimony that made Pistorius himself vomit. 

For comparative constitutionalists interested in conflicts of "free press" and "fair trial," the Pistorius trial is yet another case study.

[image of Oscar Pistorius via]

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2014/03/daily-read-media-coverage-in-the-pistorius-trial.html

Comparative Constitutionalism, Criminal Procedure, News, Speech, Television | Permalink

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