Monday, November 4, 2013

Conservative Physician Group Sues to Stop Individual Mandate

The Association of American Physicians and Surgeons filed suit last week to stop the government from enforcing the universal coverage provision (the individual mandate) in the Affordable Care Act.  The group argues that the court should issue an order prohibiting the enforcement of the individual mandate, because President Obama lacked authority to delay enforcement of the employer mandate.

Recall that President Obama this past summer unilaterally delayed enforcement of the employer mandate--the ACA's requirement that employers with over 50 employees provide health insurance for their employees.  The authority for this move, however, wasn't at all obvious.  That's because the ACA says in pretty clear language that the employer mandate "shall apply to months beginning after December 31, 2013."

We commented at the time that the question of authority might not matter, because it wasn't clear that anyone would have standing to challenge the delay.

Enter the AAPS.  The group argues that President Obama's delay of the employer mandate violates the separation of powers--that President Obama can't unilaterally delay enforcement of a statutory requirement. Still, it's not obvious why this group should have standing.  Here's what the complaint says:

13. Defendant's shifting of the mandate for health insurance premiums from employers to only individuals causes the elimination of many cash-paying patients from the medical practices of [plaintiff McQueeney, an AAPS member] and other AAPS members.  Defendant's shifting of the ACA insurance burden entirely onto individuals diverts their discretionary health care dollars towards insurance premiums, away from direct payments to physicians.  This significantly reduces the customer base for AAPS members who have "cash practices" accepting direct payments from patients.

That may not sound like the strongest theory of standing. 

But if standing's a weakness, there's more.  The complaint alleges that "Defendant changes legislation passed by Congress in violation of the separation of powers in the Constitution, and the Tenth Amendment."  (Emphasis added.)  The Tenth Amendment?  That seems surprising in this context, and unnecessary given the stronger arguments one might make about a President's inability to unilaterally delay the implementation of a mandate.

But if the invocation of the Tenth Amendment seems odd, there's yet even more.  The complaint argues that President Obama lacked authority to delay the employer mandate, but asks for a court order stopping the enforcement of the individual mandate

Between standing issues, a novel use of the Tenth Amendment, and redressability issues, this complaint has its problems. 

The attorney who filed it, Andrew Schlafly, is a conservative activist, son of Phyllis Schlafly, and founder of Conservapedia, a conservative web-site that grew out of one of Schlafly's home-school courses.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2013/11/conservative-physician-group-sues-to-stop-individual-mandate.html

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