Friday, September 6, 2013

The Syria Resolution's Last Whereas

Garrett Epps writes over at The Atlantic that the Senate's Syria Resolution contains a huge give-away to the President: congressional recognition of inherent executive authority to use the military to defend the national security interests of the United States--independent of any AUMF.

The give-away comes in the last "Whereas" of the Senate's Syria Resolution.  It reads:

Whereas the President has authority under the Constitution to use force in order to defend the national security interests of the United States . . . .

Epps writes,

The only problem is it's not true, and it represents a two-century high-water mark in claims of executive power.  Having been consulted by the president, Congress is poised to respond by throwing back at him not only the current decision but sweeping new powers he didn't have before.

Lawfare has some terrific analysis on the Senate resolution and related issues, including Jack Goldsmith's analysis of that final "Whereas" (quoted in Epps's piece).


Congressional Authority, Executive Authority, News, Separation of Powers, War Powers | Permalink

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