Thursday, September 12, 2013

Illinois Supreme Court Strikes (Old) Ban on Aggravated Use of Weapons

The Illinois Supreme Court ruled today in Illinois v. Aguilar that a state law banning the aggravated unlawful use of weapons, or AUUW, violated the Second Amendment.  At the same time, the court upheld state law banning possession of a firearm, or UPF, by a person under 18 years of age.  

The ruling overturns the conviction of the criminal defendant in the case under the AUUW, but upholds the conviction under the UPF.  

But the ruling is limited to the state's old (and defunct) AUUW and doesn't affect current law.  That's because Aguilar was convicted under the state's old AUUW.  The Seventh Circuit already struck that law as violating the Second Amendment (and later denied en banc review) in Moore v. Madigan.  The state has since amended the law to allow for concealed carry of firearms with a permit and with certain restrictions.  Thus today's ruling only affects Aguilar; it doesn't say anything about the state's current law.

Illinois's old AUUW--the one Aguilar was convicted under--says:

(a) A person commits the offense of aggravated unlawful use of a weapon when he or she knowingly:

(1) Carries on or about his or her person or in any vehicle or concealed on or about his or her person except when on his or her land or in his or her abode or fixed place of business any pistol, revolver, stun gun or taser or other firearm; [and]

(3) One of the following factors is present:

(A) the firearm possessed was uncased, loaded and immediately accessible at the time of the offense . . . .

The court, following the Seventh Circuit in Moore, held that the Second Amendment includes a right to keep and bear arms outside the home for individual self-defense, and that the "comprehensive," "categorical[]" ban in the old AUUW law "amounts to a wholesale statutory ban on the exercise of a personal right that is specifically named in and guaranteed by the United States Constitution, as construed by the United States Supreme Court."  The court said, "In no other context would we permit this, and we will not permit it here either.

At the same time, the court upheld the state's UPF law.  (That law was not changed in the wake of Moore.)  It says:

A person commits the offense of unlawful possession of firearms or firearm ammunition when:

(a) He is under 18 years of age and has in his possession any firearm of a size which may be concealed upon the person . . . .

The court said that the Second Amendment doesn't protect a juvenile's right to possess a firearm--that the UPF restriction falls into the category of allowable "longstanding prohibitions on the possession of firearms" that the Supreme Court carved out in Heller.  The court said that laws banning possession of firearms by minors have been around for a long time (even if many colonies permitted or even required minors to own and possess firearms for purposes of militia service, as Aguilar argued).

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2013/09/illinois-supreme-court-strikes-old-ban-on-aggravated-use-of-weapons.html

Cases and Case Materials, Due Process (Substantive), News, Opinion Analysis, Second Amendment | Permalink

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