Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Utility Group Lacks Standing to Intervene to Stop EPA Clean Water Rulemaking

A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit ruled this week in Defenders of Wildlife v. Perciasepe that a utility industry group lacked Article III standing to intervene in a case brought by Defenders against EPA in which the parties entered into a consent decree establishing a schedule for EPA to initiate notice-and-comment rulemaking on certain effluent limitations and effluent limitations guidelines.  

The ruling means that the EPA will move forward with notice-and-comment rulemaking pursuant to the consent decree, and that the utility group's challenge is dismissed.

The case arose when Defenders and the Sierra Club reached an agreement with the EPA to establish a schedule for notice-and-comment rulemaking to review and possibly rewrite Steam Electric effluent limitations and effluent limitations guidelines under the Clean Water Act.  Defenders filed suit and simultaneously filed a consent decree.  Eight days later, the Utility Water Act Group, or UWAG, an association of energy companies, moved to intervene (in opposition to the consent decree).  The district court denied the motion, and UWAG appealed.

The D.C. Circuit ruled that UWAG lacked standing, a requirement for intervention.  The court first held that UWAG didn't assert a procedural injury.  In particular, UWAG didn't have any claim that it should be "subject to such rulemaking only to the extent the statute commands it or authorizes EPA, in its informed discretion, to undertake it," because UWAG didn't identify a statutory procedure that the consent decree required EPA to violate.  Moreover, UWAG didn't have a procedural injury flowing from the consent decree's short notice-and-comment schedule: UWAG couldn't cite any authority that the 13-month schedule was too short.

The court next said that the consent decree didn't require EPA to promulgate new rules.  Instead, the decree simply required EPA to conduct a rulemaking and then decide whether to issue a new rule.  The court held that this wasn't enough to meet the imminent harm requirement for standing.

Assuming no successful appeal, the next step is for EPA to start its notice-and-comment procedure pursuant to the consent decree.

SDS

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2013/04/utility-group-lacks-standing-to-intervene-in-environmental-groups-suit-and-settlement-with-epa.html

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