Monday, January 14, 2013

Court to Test Limits of Congressional Authority Over Sex Offender Registration

The Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear a case asking whether Congress had authority to require a sex offender who already served out his sentence to later register when he moved within a single state.  The case comes three years on the heels of United States v. Comstock, another case involving congressional authority over federal criminals after their sentences have run, and one suggesting expansive congressional authority.  (Comstock held that Congress had authority under the Necessary and Proper Clause to designate federal prisoners as "sexually dangerous" and to detain them even beyond their original sentence.)  It also comes just one year after the Court's sharply divided and controversial ruling in NFIB v. Sebelius, the ACA/Obamacare challenge defining a limit on congressional authority and holding that Congress lacked authority under the Commerce Clause to require individuals to purchase health insurance.  (NFIB also held that Congress had authority under its taxing power to require individuals to purchase health insurance.)  This case, United States v. Kebodeaux, thus gives the Roberts Court yet another important opportunity to define congressional authority and to read that authority as relatively broad (as in Comstock) or to find an important limit (as in NFIB--even if a different limit than the Court found in that case).

Kebodeaux involves a challenge to the federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act, or SORNA.  SORNA, enacted in July 2006, requires sex offenders to register in the jurisdiction where they live.  It requires states to adopt specified federal standards for registration as a condition of receipt of federal funds.

Kebodeaux, a convicted sex offender who served out his sentence and was released from prison "unconditionally" (the Fifth Circuit's word), was convicted of violating SORNA by failing to register when he moved from El Paso to San Antonio.  Kebodeaux challenged his conviction on appeal, arguing that Congress lacked authority to penalize his failure to register in a purely intrastate move, because he had served his full sentence and was released by the time Congress enacted the registration requirement in SORNA.

The en banc Fifth Circuit agreed.  It ruled that Congress had no authority over Kebodeaux when he made an intrastate move after he served out his full sentence.  In short, the court said that the period of time between Kebodeaux's release and Congress's enactment of the registration requirement in SORNA broke the chain linking congressional authority and Kebodeaux, and Kebodeaux did not re-establish that chain (by way of the Commerce Clause) by crossing state lines.  The court distinguished Comstock on exactly that basis: in Comstock, the federal government still had physical control over federal prisoners designated "sexually dangerous," even if they were literally on their way out of the federal prison, and thus had authority to regulate them by ordering their continued detention; here, in contrast, the federal government had no control over Kebodeaux. 

Kebodeaux's facts go beyond those in Comstock, however, because this case is not merely about whether Congress can regulate the activity of someone still in federal custody past the expiry of his sentence.  Importantly, it raises the further question whether Congress can regulate his activity solely because he was once convicted of a federal crime.

Op. at 6.

The court also worries that this authority would know no bounds and would intrude into areas of state regulation.  And it worries that there is no authority, "from more than two hundred years of precedent, for the proposition that it can reassert jurisdiction over someone it had long ago unconditionally released from custody just because he once committed a federal crime."  Op. at 9. 

If these worries sound familiar, it's because similar worries drove the opponents of the ACA/Obamacare, and ultimately even the Court, in ruling that Congress exceeded its Commerce Clause authority in enacting the universal coverage provision, or the so-called individual mandate, in NFIB v. Sebelius.  Many of us didn't see this coming in NFIB.  A similar limit on congressional authority may be creeping up on us now.

On the other hand, the panel decision and sharp dissents in the Fifth Circuit en banc ruling argued that Comstock supported congressional authority to apply SORNA's registration requirements to Kebodeaux.  This case could well follow Comstock and (again) highlight expansive congressional authority over those once in federal control. 

Either way, Comstock, the sleeper of OT2009, will play a key role in the outcome.  And the case will give us one more important datapoint to plot the trajectory of congressional authority under the Roberts Court.

SDS

 

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