Friday, October 12, 2012

Rabbis File Complaint Against NYC Regulation Requiring Circumcision Notice

The complaint filed in the Southern District of New York federal court in Central Rabbinical Congress v. NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene challenges the constitutionality of a recently passed regulation regulating circumcision on the basis of the First Amendment.  This is a much more narrow regulation that the San Francisco proposal to ban all male circumcision.

The NYC regulation, §181.21, goes into effect October 21 and amends the NYC Health Code, by requiring specific consent and a warning for "oral suction" circumcision:

A person may not perform a circumcision that involves direct oral suction on an infant under one year of age, without obtaining, prior to the circumcision, the written signed and dated consent of a parent or legal guardian of the infant being circumcised using a form provided by the Department or a form which shall be labeled “Consent to perform oral suction during circumcision,” and which at a minimum shall include the infant’s date of birth, the full printed name of the infant’s parent(s), the name of the individual performing the circumcision and the following statement: “I understand that direct oral suction will be performed on my child and that the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene advises parents that direct oral suction should not be performed because it exposes an infant to the risk of transmission of herpes simplex virus infection, which may result in brain damage or death.”

The complaint's first count contends that the city may not compel speech absent a satisfaction of strict scrutiny, and that the section requires the person performing the circumcision - - - the mohelim in Orthodox Jewish tradition - - - to disseminate advice that he would not otherwise give, with which he disagrees, and that is a "value-based opinion" rather than a fact.  Interestingly, this is similar to the arguments against abortion consent procedures and warnings, although the complaint also notes that the mohelim are not commercial or professional actors.

The second - - - and perhaps more predictable count - - - sounds under the First Amendment's free exercise clause (and a subsequent count invokes the New York Constitution's similar clause).  The complaint alleges that the regulation was

designed to target the “practice known as metzitzah b’peh,” and the Department’s deputy commissioner for disease control described the regulation as an effort to “regulat[e] how part of a religious procedure is done”

This "targeting," of course, would mean the law would be subject to strict scrutiny under Church of Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah (1993), the case involving the ritual slaughtering of animals as a practice of the Santeria religion.  The ordinance of City of Hialeah had exemptions for other types of slaughter, a problem not only as to the "targeting" inquiry, but also as to the application of strict scrutiny.  

 

RR

October 12, 2012 in First Amendment, Fourteenth Amendment, Religion, Speech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Daily Read: Vikram Amar on Scalia on Originalism

Over at Justia today, ConLawProf Vikram Amar (pictured) responds to Justice Scalia's well-publicized and controversial remarks that originalism makes issues such as "homosexuality" and abortion "easy."

AmarAmar writes:

But to say that originalism is important and helpful does not mean that it is easy. To see this, let us first look at what it would mean to say that all constitutional disputes should be analyzed and resolved by exclusive reference to originalism.  It would mean, among other things, that the Supreme Court’s cases from the 1960s holding that states may not impose poll taxes or property qualifications on the franchise, because under the Equal Protection Clause and other parts of Section One of the Fourteenth Amendment there is an individual right to vote for legislative elections, are flawed.  So too would be the cases holding, again under the Equal Protection Clause, that states cannot draw voter districts of significantly different sizes (thereby discriminating against urban voters); originalism would call into question the idea that the Equal Protection Clause guarantees “one person, one vote” in legislative elections.

 Amar does not add - - - and perhaps he does not need to - - - any discussion of Bush v. Gore

Instead, Amar focuses his argument on cases that Scalia himself implicated.  Amar's ultimate conclusion is probably one that almost every law student, and most ConLawProfs, could credit:

My point here is not to disagree with any particular outcome that Justice Scalia supports in these or other areas—in fact, I sometimes agree with his constitutional bottom line, and at other times do not.  But my goal here has simply been to suggest that all of this stuff is a long way from “easy.”

RR

October 12, 2012 in Due Process (Substantive), Equal Protection, Supreme Court (US), Theory | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Court Remands USDA Loan Denial for Religion Clause Evaluation

Judge Reggie Walton (D.D.C.) remanded a religious service organization's appeal of its denial of a USDA loan to the agency for review of the constitutional claims involved in the appeal.  The ruling in Care Net Pregnancy Center v. USDA means that the agency will take the first crack at the Free Exercise and Establishment Clause and free speech claims in the case.

Care Net applied for a USDA loan through the Community Facilities Loan Program, which makes and guarantees loans to non-profits and others for essential services in rural areas.  Care Net intended to use the loan to purchase property for its "Learn to Earn" program, including classes that help clients prepare for parenthood and option Bible study.  Care Net proposed to host its optional Bible study after hours in the same space as its parenting classes and thus claimed that its optional Bible study--the only religious aspect to its program--added no cost to the purchase and renovation of the property.  In short, the religious aspect of the program merely piggy-backed on the secular aspect.

The USDA nevertheless denied the application, stating that the project was not eligible under agency regs.  Care Net appealed to a USDA hearing officer, arguing, among other things, that the denial violated free speech and the Free Exercise Clause; the agency said that granting the application would violate the Establishment Clause. 

The hearing officer affirmed the agency's denial of Care Net's application based on an agency reg that reads in relevant part,

Where a structure is used for both eligible and inherently religious activities, direct USDA assistance may not exceed the cost of those portions of the acquisition, construction, or rehabilitation that are attributable to eligible activities in accordance with the cost accounting requirements applicable to USDA funds.

7 C.F.R. Sec. 16.3(d)(1).  The hearing officer wrote that Care Net failed to provide sufficient information about its program to allow the USDA "to realistically separate the eligible activities from the inherently religious activities either by time or space, thereby creating an excessive entanglement between Government and religion."  The officer rejected Care Net's argument that the regulation allowed the agency to issue a loan for the full amount of the project, when the religious portion of the project merely piggy-backed on the secular portion (and didn't add anything to the cost).  The officer declined to address any constitutional claim, however, beyond the statement that Care Net's proposed use would cause excessive entanglement with religion.  (The officer wrote that his role was simply to apply agency regs, not to rule on their constitutionality.)

Judge Walton affirmed the hearing officer's interpretation of the regulation--that the regulation prohibited loans for projects that didn't sufficiently segregate the costs of religious and secular components--but remanded the case for consideration of the religion clause claims and the free speech claim.  Quoting D.C. Circuit law, Judge Walton wrote that "[a]gencies . . . have 'an obligation to address properly presented constitutional claims which . . . do not challenge agency actions mandated by Congress,'" in order to ensure against premature or unnecessary constitutional adjudication and to give the courts teh benefit of the agency's first-crack analysis.

SDS

October 11, 2012 in Cases and Case Materials, Establishment Clause, First Amendment, Free Exercise Clause, News, Opinion Analysis, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sixth Circuit on Ohio Voting Issues Arising from Poll-Worker Error

510px-DSCN4516_portconneautflag_eIn its opinion today in Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless v. Husted, consolidated on appeal with SEUI v. Husted, the Sixth Circuit considered yet another  problem with Ohio's voting regime and as in Obama for America v. Husted decided last week regarding early voting ruled mostly against the state. 

The 35 page per curium opinion considers Ohio’s requirements that provisional ballots be cast in the correct precinct and with completed voter affirmation, making no exception for wrong-precinct and deficient-affirmation ballots caused by poll-worker error.

The Sixth Circuit affirmed the district judge's injunction in SEIU v. Husted regarding wrong precinct voting as a denial of equal protection.  After extension discussion regarding factual nuances of the district court's order, the Sixth Circuit upheld the wrong precinct voting injunction.  However, in a very brief analysis, the panel reversed the injunction against deficient affirmation ballots, finding that the "spotty record" did not support the judge's presumption of poll-worker error.

Yet the panel's own ruling created some equal protection issues:

we note some additional issues our ruling creates that must be resolved. While we have set aside the portion of the preliminary injunction addressing deficient-affirmation provisional ballots, the consent decree continues to mandate that some deficient-affirmation provisional ballots will be counted. This discrepancy appears to create a Bush v. Gore problem. Similarly, the consent decree standing on its own also raises Bush v. Gore issues by virtue of treating some provisional ballots differently than others. This latter concern is not purely academic, as the consent decree will be the only agreement governing these issues for Ohio’s 2013 primary elections.

Thus, the panel remanded the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless case for the district judge to "expeditiously address" the equal protection issue created by the consent decree’s provision for the counting of deficient-affirmation ballots and the motion to modify the consent decree in light of the equal protection concerns raised by the consent decree’s differential treatment of provisional ballots.

RR
[image via]

October 11, 2012 in Current Affairs, Elections and Voting, Equal Protection, Fourteenth Amendment, Opinion Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Daily Read: Rebecca Lee on Core Diversity

Rebecca-leeProfessor Rebecca Lee (pictured) notes that "in this age of ““diversity talk,”” it may seem that the issue of workplace discrimination is somewhat passé, or at least not as much of the problem it was in the past."  That was certainly some of the sentiment in yesterday's oral argument in Fisher v. UT.  But Lee offers a more sophisticated interpretation, arguing that

Most employers implement models of diversity that promote only what I call ““surface diversity”” and ““marginal diversity,”” both of which focus on diversifying the organization’’s ranks but which stop short of valuing diversity in full form, thus inhibiting substantive equity. The surface and marginal diversity paradigms neglect to treat the malady of embedded discrimination because they emphasize demographic diversity rather than diversity in a substantive sense. A focus on numerical parity alone, however, will not bring about racial and gender equity. Although women and people of color have been entering various workplaces in increasing numbers, the way in which work gets done has not changed much. This is because simply adding more members of previously excluded groups to the organization may not change dominant organizational practices that remain biased against such groups.

Instead in her 2010 article entitled Core Diversity, available on ssrn, Lee argues that much deeper and more structural change is necessary.  This is definitely worth a read.

Lee's follow-up article, Implementing Grutter's Diversity Rationale: Diversity and Empathy in Leadership, available on ssrn, is also essential reading.  In this article, Professor Lee makes more explicit the links between educational diversity and employment diversity.

RR

October 11, 2012 in Affirmative Action, Equal Protection, Gender, Race, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Congressional Denial of Automatic COLAs for Judges Violates Compensation Clause

The en banc Federal Circuit ruled on Friday in Beer v. U.S. that congressional denial of automatic and determinate cost-of-living-adjustments to the salaries of federal judges violated the Compensation Clause in Article III.  The ruling sends the case back to the Court of Federal Claims and almost surely means that federal judges will receive retroactive COLAs, unless the case is overturned on appeal (to the Supreme Court).  It means that Congress can't go back on automatic and definite COLA increases for judges--or any other future salary adjustments that are sufficiently determinate to set judges' expectations--even if it can go back on future year COLA increases if they are sufficiently squishy.

The case involved a 1989 congressional act that set an automatic and determinate formula--a "mechanical" formula, according to the court--for COLAs for federal judges.  (Under the prior law, enacted in 1975, judges' COLAs were pegged to the President's report to Congress on General Schedule federal employee COLAs, which, in turn, was set based on annual reports by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Advisory Committee on Federal Pay.  The 1975 law, then, set no definite formula for future COLAs; instead, COLAs could vary year-to-year based on the BLS and Advisory Committee reports and based on the President's report to Congress.)  Despite the automatic formula in the 1989 act, Congress denied COLAs in 1995, 1996, 1997, and 1999.  Judges sued, arguing that these denials violated the Compensation Clause.

The Compensation Clause says that federal judicial  "Compensation . . . shall not be diminished during [judges'] Continuance in Office."  But the framers deliberately declined to tie judicial salaries to commodities or other standards of measurement (to establish an early kind of COLA), and the Clause does not require periodic increases in judicial salaries to offset inflation or other economic factors.  Indeed, the Supreme Court ruled in United States v. Will (1980) that congressional acts declining to extend COLAs under the 1975 law did not violate the Compensation Clause.  (The Court in Will said that Congress could go back on future year COLAs, but not on current year COLAs, under the 1975 law, because "a salary increase 'vests' . . . only when it takes effect as part of the compensation due and payable to Article III judges"--in the current year.)

The difference here, said the court, is that the 1989 law, with its automatic and determinate formula, set judges' salary expectations, which then became part of their "Compensation" for Compensation Clause purposes.  The court explained:

In essence, the statutes reviewed in Will required judicial divination to predict a COLA and prevented the creation of firm expectations that judges would in fact receive any inflation-compensating adjustment.  In that context, as the Supreme Court noted, no adjustment vested until formally enacted and received.  However, the statutes in Williams and in this case provide COLAs according to a mechanical, automatic process that creates expectation and reliance when read in light of the Compensation Clause.  Indeed a prospective judicial nominee in 1989 might well have decided to forego a lucrative legal career, based, in part, on the promise that the new adjustment scheme would preserve the real value of judicial compensation.

Op. at 13.  

Moreover, the automatic formula in the 1989 act was part of a legislative quid pro quo that included limits on judges' outside income, effectively limiting their income.  Thus, "the statute ensured that real judicial salary would not be reduced in the fact of the elimination of outside income and the operation of inflation."  Op. at 15.

In ruling that congressional denials of COLAs violated the Compensation Clause, the court overturned its own precedent, Williams v. United States, which held that denials of COLAs under the 1989 law did not violate the Compensation Clause.

SDS

 

October 10, 2012 in Cases and Case Materials, Congressional Authority, Courts and Judging, News, Opinion Analysis | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Fisher v. University of Texas: Oral Argument

200px-Large_university-of-texas_seal_rgb(199-91-18)The Court's oral argument today in Fisher v. UT contained few surprises for those acquainted with the parties' briefs or our preview yesterday.

Bert Rein, arguing on behalf of petitioner Abigal Fisher opened his argument with a classic issue statement:

The central issue here is whether the University of Texas at Austin can carry its burden approving that its use of race as an admissions-plus factor in the consequent denial of equal treatment, which is the central mandate of the Equal Protection Clause, to Abigail Fisher met the two tests of strict scrutiny which are applicable.

His attempt to expand - - - by stating "first" - - - was quickly interrupted by Justice Ginsburg who raised the issue of standing, an inquiry that Justice Sotomayor joined.  Justice Scalia attempted to provide an answer, referring to Fisher's as being "that she was denied a fair chance in the admission lottery."

Justice Breyer moved to the question of whether Fisher was asking the Court to "overrule Grutter," a question that Rein answered by stating that Fisher "could satisfy Grutter" if the case was "properly read." 

During the rebuttal argument, Sotomayor asked "So you don't want to overrule Grutter, you just want to gut it."

MR. REIN: Excuse me?

JUSTICE SOTOMAYOR: You just want to gut it. You don't want to overrule it, but you just want to gut it.

MR. REIN: Well -­

JUSTICE SOTOMAYOR: Now you want to tell universities that once you reach a certain number, then you can't use race anymore.

MR. REIN: Justice Sotomayor, I don't want to gut it. And the only way one could reach that conclusion is to assume that Grutter is an unlimited mandate without end point to just use race to your own satisfaction and to be deferred to in your use of race. That is unacceptable. That is the invasion of Abigail Fisher's rights to equal protection under the law. Thank you.

During the main argument, however, the Grutter discussion led to an extended discussion of the effect of Texas' "ten percent" program, to which the Grutter type admissions policy was only an augment. 

 Arguing for University of Texas, Gregory Garre also opened with a classic issue articulation - and was also quickly interrupted:

For two overriding reasons, the admissions plan before you is constitutional under this Court's precedents. First, it is indistinguishable in terms of how it operates in taking race into account as only one modest factor among many for the individualized considerations of applicants in their totality from plans that this Court has upheld in Grutter and plans that this Court approved in Bakke and the Harvard plan.

JUSTICE SOTOMAYOR: I -- I put that in the narrow tailoring category, that it is narrowly tailored the way Grutter did, said.

Chief Justice Roberts soon focused on the question of numbers and identity categories:

CHIEF JUSTICE ROBERTS: Counsel, before -- I need to figure out exactly what these numbers mean. Should someone who is one-quarter Hispanic check the Hispanic box or some different box?
MR. GARRE: Your Honor, there is a multiracial box. Students check boxes based on their own determination. This is true under the Common Application -­
CHIEF JUSTICE ROBERTS: Well, I suppose a person who is one-quarter percent Hispanic, his own determination, would be I'm one-quarter percent Hispanic.
MR. GARRE: Then they would check that box, Your Honor, as is true -­
CHIEF JUSTICE ROBERTS: They would check that box. What about one-eighth?
With Justice Kennedy widely considered the "swing vote" on this case, certainly there will be much parsing of Kennedy's queries.  He seemed focused on understanding the facts as well as their implications.  
For Fisher's counsel, Kennedy posed a question that was raised for many readers of Petitioner's brief:
You argue that the University's race-conscious admission plan is not necessary to achieve a diverse student body because it admits so few people, so few minorities. And I had trouble with that reading the brief. I said, well, if it's so few, then what's the problem.
In dialogue with Garre, Kennedy seemed particularly troubled by any mention of race, asking at one point "So what you're saying is that what counts is race above all."

And arguing for the federal government, supporting the position of University of Texas, Solicitor General Verrilli referred numerous times to Kennedy's dissent in Grutter and concurring opinion in Parents Involved, ending by stating:

I think it is important, Your Honors, not just to government, but to the country, that our universities have the flexibility to shape their environments and their educational experience to make a reality of the principle that Justice Kennedy identified in Parents Involved, that our strength comes from people of different races, different creeds, different cultures, uniting in a commitment to freedom, and to more a perfect union. That's what the University of Texas is trying to do with its admissions policy, and it should be upheld.

 

RR

October 10, 2012 in Affirmative Action, Equal Protection, Fourteenth Amendment, Oral Argument Analysis, Supreme Court (US) | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Daily Read: Malcolm Gladwell on Ivy League Admissions

Writing in the New Yorker in 2005, Malcolm Gladwell (pictured) argued that the fuss over admissions is best understood as consumerist: ivy league schools are a "luxury brand" - - - "an exquisitely constructed fantasy of what it means to belong to an élite - - - and they have always been mindful of what must be done to maintain that experience."

400px-MalcolmgladwellHere's what he had to say about legal education:

Most élite law schools, to cite another example, follow a best-students model. That’s why they rely so heavily on the L.S.A.T. Yet there’s no reason to believe that a person’s L.S.A.T. scores have much relation to how good a lawyer he will be. In a recent research project funded by the Law School Admission Council, the Berkeley researchers Sheldon Zedeck and Marjorie Shultz identified twenty-six “competencies” that they think effective lawyering demands—among them practical judgment, passion and engagement, legal-research skills, questioning and interviewing skills, negotiation skills, stress management, and so on—and the L.S.A.T. picks up only a handful of them. A law school that wants to select the best possible lawyers has to use a very different admissions process from a law school that wants to select the best possible law students. And wouldn’t we prefer that at least some law schools try to select good lawyers instead of good law students?

This search for good lawyers, furthermore, is necessarily going to be subjective, because things like passion and engagement can’t be measured as precisely as academic proficiency. Subjectivity in the admissions process is not just an occasion for discrimination; it is also, in better times, the only means available for giving us the social outcome we want.

While Gladwell doesn't discuss the specific type of "affirmative action" at issue in Fisher, his essay is certainly relevant to law school admission policies and to Fisher's articulation of the harm of not being admitted to UT undergraduate school.

RR
[image of Malcolm Gladwell via]

October 10, 2012 in Affirmative Action, Equal Protection | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Fisher v. University of Texas: Oral Argument Preview

The oral argument in Fisher v. UT - - - this term's "affirmative action" case - - - is scheduled for tomorrow and has been receiving much attention as SCOTUSBlog notes. One of the more interesting pieces is Adam Liptak's personalized NYT article that includes quotes from Abigal Fisher, who believes she "probably would have gotten a better job offer" if she had "gone to U.T.," as well as quotes from students.  There is noteworthy scholarly attention.  And as usual Lyle Denniston over at SCOTUSBlog does an excellent job parsing the issues as well as the possible line-ups of the Justices, asking provocatively "is affirmative action about to end?" Moreover, still one of the best templates of the issues is the "dissental" from en banc review in the Fifth Circuit by controversial Judge Edith Jones.

To the extent constitutional and legal arguments matter - - - and for some, that is a debatable question - - - there are several problematic twists that Fisher v. UT presents.

6a00d8341bfae553ef016762bb6a55970b-500wi
First, there is the standing of Abigal Fisher and relatedly, her claim for injury.  This is not a case in which she was disabled from competing from any specific seat, unlike Bakke, and this is also a case in which she did attend university, unlike Barbara Grutter who did not attend law school.  Adam Chandler has a terrific explanation of this aspect of the case, that he expanded here. 

Second, there are factual discrepancies, and a problematic concession by Fisher regarding UT's government interest in seeking diversity. 

If the Justices seem focused on the facts of the case during oral argument, this might be an indication that the Court would not render a decision on the merits because of these sorts of problems.

Third, there is a doctrinal issue in the case that bears notice.  As one of its three sub-arguments that the UT plan fails strict scrutiny, Fisher argues that "UT cannot establish a strong basis in evidence that its use of race is necessary to further a compelling interest in student-body diversity."  Sandwiched between the usual first prong of the "compelling interest" requirement and the second prong of the "narrowly tailored" requirement, this argument seeks to introduce a new prong.  Fisher's argument in the main brief is telling:

UT also must demonstrate that its use of race in admissions is “necessary to further” an unmet compelling government interest. Adarand, 515 U.S. at 237. This demonstration of necessity requires a “strong basis in evidence.” Wygant, 476 U.S. at 277; Croson, 488 U.S. at 500; Grutter, 539 U.S. at 387-88 (Kennedy, J., dissenting) (“Our precedents provide a basis for the Court’s acceptance of a university’s considered judgment that racial diversity among students can further its educational task, when supported by empirical evidence.”) (emphasis added).

Recall that Adarand, Wygant, and Croson each involved "remedying past discrimination" as the compelling government interest (not diversity) and note that the citation from the 2003 Grutter v. Bollinger is from Justice Kennedy's dissent.  Kennedy is widely considered the swing vote in Fisher, and much of UT's brief seems addressed to Kennedy.

Nevertheless, this "strong basis in evidence" standard is, of course, directly opposed to the "good faith" standard that Justice O'Connor articulated in Grutter. T he Court could easily "gloss" rather than explicitly overrule Grutter by reading in a high - - - and nearly impossible to meet - - - evidentiary standard.

Thus, at the heart of the matter may be just how much deference the Justices may be willing to pay to a state, including a state university, or how much the "unelected federal judiciary" may substitute its own judgments.

RR
UPDATE: discussion of oral argument here.

October 9, 2012 in Affirmative Action, Current Affairs, Equal Protection, Fourteenth Amendment, Oral Argument Analysis, Race, Reconstruction Era Amendments, Supreme Court (US) | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Daily Read: Bowden on Obama on binLaden's Possible Article III Trial

9780802120342In the just-published book The Finish: The Killing of Osama bin Laden by Mark Bowden apparently argues that

in the unlikely event that bin Laden surrendered, Obama saw an opportunity to resurrect the idea of a criminal trial, which Attorney General Eric Holder had planned for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. This time, the president tells Bowden, he was prepared to bring bin Laden back and put him on trial in a federal court. “We worked through the legal and political issues that would have been involved, and Congress and the desire to send him to Guantánamo, and to not try him, and Article III.” Obama continues: “I mean, we had worked through a whole bunch of those scenarios. But, frankly, my belief was if we had captured him, that I would be in a pretty strong position, politically, here, to argue that displaying due process and rule of law would be our best weapon against al-Qaeda, in preventing him from appearing as a martyr.”

Obama's representations, given in an interview with Bowden, present an interesting - - - and perhaps unlikely - - - counterfactual.  Over at Lawfare, Wells Bennett observes that "it seems a safe bet that congressional resistance to a civilian prosecution would have been extreme, at least as heated as the resistance to the civilian prosecution of the 9/11 co-conspirators."

RR

October 9, 2012 in Books, Courts and Judging, Current Affairs, Executive Authority, Foreign Affairs, International, Jurisdiction of Federal Courts, News, War Powers | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 8, 2012

Daily Read: Skibine on Native American Religious Land Protections

In Towards A Balanced Approach for the Protection of Native American Sacred Sites, 17 Mich. J. Race & L. 269 (2012), available on ssrn, ConLawProf Alex Tallchief Skibine navigates the difficult territory of the First Amendment and RFRA, including the applicability of Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery, in the context of  Native American claims. 

Skibine posits that "Native American religions are land based."  He notes that sacred places "used to be located within the tribes' ancestral territories, but as a result of conquest, land cessions, and other historical events, many sacred sites are now located on federal land."  Skibine criticizes the tendency, so evident in Lyng, to “equate Indians' religious exercises at sacred sites with Western yoga-like practices.”

 In other words, this view portrays Native religious activities at sacred sites as only about spiritual peace of mind. While such benefits are certainly part of the practice, they do not go to the heart of why these sacred places are important to Indian people or why management practices like cutting down trees and spilling recycled sewage water on sacred land are extremely disturbing to many Indian tribes. The importance of sacred sites to Indian tribes and Native practitioners is less about individual spiritual development and more about the continuing existence of Indians as a tribal people. The preservation of these sites as well as tribal people's ability to practice their religion there is intrinsically related to the survival of tribes as both cultural and self-governing entities

 

Prayer-flags-huey_59625_990x742
"Prayer Flags, Wyoming"
photograph by Aaron Huey, National Geographic, Photo of the Day (October 1, 2012).
"Nine-year-old Wakinyan Two Bulls places prayer flags in a tree near Mato Tipila ("bear lodge"), or Devils Tower, in Wyoming."

 

 Professor Skibine proposes legislative compromise and clarity, including an intermediate scrutiny standard, arguing:

In adopting intermediate scrutiny to review governmental actions jeopardizing sacred sites, I hope to appease some critics who will argue that Native Americans should not be allowed to use religion to reclaim control over an unlimited amount of land that was taken from them throughout history. This is another version of the argument made by some that to the Indians, the whole earth is sacred and if we allow one claim, the floodgates will be open and there will be no end to claims of sacredness.

RR
[image via]

October 8, 2012 in First Amendment, History, Race, Religion, Scholarship, Theory | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 7, 2012

Supreme Court Fellows Program

Want to be a fellow at the United States Supreme Court?

Screen Shot 2012-10-07 at 2.00.18 PM

The United States Supreme Court Fellows Program is currently accepting applications for mid-career professionals interested in pursuing a one-year fellowship at the Court.  

Fellows are posted with one of four agencies (the Office of the Counselor, the Sentencing Commission, the Federal Judicial Center and the Administrative Office), depending on the interest and expertise of the fellow in question.

DEADLINE:November 30.

More information here.

RR

 

October 7, 2012 in Courts and Judging, Supreme Court (US) | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)