Friday, November 9, 2012

Daily Read: Iron Curtain and Constitutional Rights

9780385515696_custom-07bec2eeb38f9203f224afe4e12dd9d64e1a0026-s15Anne Applebaum's new book, Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1945-1956, is a sequel of sorts to her book Gulag, which won the Pulitzer prize.  In a recent interview with Terry Gross on Fresh Air, Applebaum talked about the centrality of controlled media and art to Soviet Communist domination. 

For example, there was a government suppression of "abstract art":

The fear of abstract art is that it could be interpreted in many ways, and who knows what you could read into a painting that didn't have a clear message? One of the obsessions that the Soviet Union and the Eastern European communist parties had was always controlling the message — all information that everybody gets has to be carefully controlled and monitored. Art was no exception. Art was supposed to tell a story, it was supposed to have a happy ending, it was supposed to teach, it was supposed to support the ideals of the party. There was no such thing as art for art's sake, and there was no such thing as art reaching into some kind of spiritual, wordless realm. No, art was done in service of the state, and it was something that was going to help mold people and create citizens who do what the state tells them, and who follow the rules.

While her project is not a comparative one, her book demonstrates the centrality of the constellation of rights protected under the United States' Constitution's First Amendment, including expression, media, and religion.  Also important would be any rights of habeas corpus, due process, and those pertaining to criminal procedure as a means of resistance to government oppression. 

RR

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2012/11/daily-read-iron-curtain-and-art.html

Books, Comparative Constitutionalism, First Amendment, Speech | Permalink

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