Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Ninth Circuit Says No Waiver of Sovereign Immunity in Case Challenging TSP

In the latest and perhaps last chapter of the Al-Haramain case, the Ninth Circuit ruled that the government did not unequivocally waive sovereign immunity through the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act civil liability provision, ending the plaintiffs' case challenging the government's terrorist surveillance program.

As the court said, "[t]his case effectively brings to an end the plaintiffs' ongoing attempts to hold the Executive Branch responsible for intercepting telephone conversations without judicial authorization."  Op. at 8784.

Recall that the plaintiffs sued under the FISA's civil liability provision for damages resulting from the government's surveillance of them through the TSP.  Most recently, the district court ruled that the state secrets privilege did not foreclose the plaintiffs' suit--that "FISA preempts or displaces the state secrets privilege . . . in cases within the reach of its provisions"--and that the government implicitly waived sovereign immunity through FISA.  The district court ruling would have allowed the case to move forward.

But the Ninth Circuit stopped it.  The court ruled that the government did not unequivocally waive sovereign immunity through the FISA civil damages provision, and therefore the plaintiffs could not sue for damages from the government.

The FISA civil damages provision, 50 U.S.C. Sec. 1810, reads,

An aggrieved person . . . who has been subjected to an electronic surveillance or about whom information obtained by electronic surveillance of such person has been disclosed or used in violation of section 1809 of this title shall have a cause of action against any person who committed such violation . . . .

For the court, the key missing phrase was "the United States" (as in "against the United States" or "the United States shall be liable")--a mainstay of statutes in which the government unequivocally waived sovereign immunity.  Without such an unequivocal waiver, the government cannot be sued for damages.

Even with the government off the hook, though, the plaintiffs still could have proceeded against FBI Director Mueller, another defendant in the action (and a "person" under 50 U.S.C. Sec. 1810).  But the court said that the plaintiffs "never vigorously pursued its claim against Mueller" and dismissed it.  Op. at 8797.

The case almost certainly puts an end to the plaintiffs' litigation efforts to hold the government responsible for the TSP.

SDS

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2012/08/ninth-circuit-says-no-waiver-of-sovereign-immunity-in-case-challenging-tsp.html

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Comments

great blog, thank you! keep the informational post coming.

Posted by: Blumenreich Law Firm | Aug 9, 2012 9:11:07 AM

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