Thursday, March 22, 2012

Generic Drug Claims Dismissed in Wake of PLIVA

The Supreme Court ruled last year in PLIVA v. Mensing that federal prescription drug laws preempt plaintiffs' state failure-to-warn claims against generic drug manufacturers, even as it ruled three years again in Wyeth v. Levine that similar federal laws do not preempt plaintiffs' state law claims against brand-name manufacturers.

The New York Times this week examined the impact of Mensing and, unsurprisingly, found that courts are routinely dismissing state law claims against generic manufacturers, and that many generic prescription drug users have no idea that they are waiving their claims against manufacturers simply by opting for a generic equivalent over a brand-name drug:

The Supreme Court ruling affects potentially millions of people: nearly 80 percent of prescriptions in the United States are filled by a generic, and most states permit pharmacists to dispense a generic in place of a brand name.  More than 40 judges have dismissed cases against generic manufacturers since the Supreme Court ruled last June, including some who dismissed dozens of cases consolidated under one judge.

The article reminds readers that Congress could easily change the landscape and allow suits against generics to go forward.  But it doesn't look like that'll happen anytime soon.

SDS

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2012/03/generic-drug-claims-dismissed-in-wake-of-pliva.html

Cases and Case Materials, News, Preemption | Permalink

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