Tuesday, August 2, 2011

DOJ Files Complaint Against Alabama Immigration Law

Alabama's HB56, signed into law in June, and being touted as the "nations' toughest immigration law," is the subject of another challenge in federal court.  Last month's lawsuit, which we discussed here, Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama v. Bentley, had eight constitutional claims including claims under the Supremacy Clause (arguing that the state law is pre-empted); Fourth Amendment; Equal Protection Clause; Due Process Clause;  First amendment claims including speech, assembly, and petition clauses, the Contracts Clause, and Sixth Amendment.   

Animated-Flag-Alabama The DOJ complaint, in U.S. v. Alabama, focuses on Supremacy Clause issues, as might be expected.  Counts I and II argue that HB56's sections 10, 11(a), 12(a), 13, 16, 17, 18, 27, 28, and 30 violate the Supremacy Clause, and are pre-empted by federal law, respectively.   Count III alleges that HB56 section 13 restricts the interstate movement of aliens in a manner that is prohibited by Article One, Section Eight of the Constitution, the Commerce Clause.

Here's a flavor of the DOJ's basic pre-emption argument:

the federal government will be required to divert resources from its own, carefully considered enforcement primary priorities — aliens who pose a threat to national security and public safety — to address the work that Alabama will now create for it — verification of individuals who are caught driving without a license or jaywalking.

The DOJ is seeking a preliminary and permanent injunction of the statute scheduled to become effective September 1.

The Alabama statute is thus now subject to two challenges in federal court. [update: Clergy have also filed a lawsuit, discussed here]

Similar state immigration laws have also been enjoined by federal courts: Arizona's SB1070, partially enjoined with the injunction upheld on appealIndiana's statute; and Georgia's statute

RR

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2011/08/doj-files-complaint-against-alabama-immigration-law.html

Commerce Clause, Current Affairs, Federalism, Preemption, Supremacy Clause | Permalink

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