Clinical Law Prof Blog

Editor: Jeffrey R. Baker
Pepperdine University
School of Law

Friday, October 23, 2015

Lessons from the National Canadian Clinical Conference

Our Canadian colleagues are gathering this weekend at the sixth annual conference of the Association for Canadian Clinical Legal Education (ACCLE). The conference theme is “The Place of Clinical Legal Education” and is being hosted by the University of Saskatchewan College of Law in Saskatoon.

The ACCLE is a relatively young and vibrant organization comprised of individuals and clinics seeking:

(a) to provide a forum for legal educators across Canada to share best practices, pedagogies and other information related to clinical legal education;

(b) to encourage the promotion and improvement of clinical legal education in Canadian law schools;

(c)  to promote clinical pedagogy and research;

(d) to facilitate the dissemination of information pertaining to clinical legal education to clinicians in Canada; and

(e) to promote or organize conferences or other activities to facilitate the purposes of the association.

The conference was preceded by a community tour and scholarship workshop yesterday, and officially opened this morning with a keynote address by Maria Campbell, an award-winning writer, playwright, and teacher whose Aboriginal heritage informs her work. She spoke about “The Place of Clinics in Reconciliation” and immersed the room in oral tradition (all pens, paper, and devices tucked away) while she led participants through circle after circle of her people’s history and tradition. She described a high-functioning social system in which grandmothers were the “keepers of the law,” animals were regarded as cousins (hunted only with restraint and humility), songs were sung to call babies out of the womb, and kindness and generosity were the most esteemed values.

The community strength endured for hundreds of years in generation after generation until the colonization of the North American continent, which led to the banning of midwifes and community burials; the recategorization of wives and children as property (consistent with the European tradition) and their subsequent beating as taught by the Jesuit priests  according to the “rule of thumb”; and the round up of well-loved children with intact families who were taken away by  “authorities” in large black cars and sent to live in residential schools and foster homes, where many were sexually abused. The consequences of these afflictions remain evident in many communities to this day.

How do clinics help communities to heal after such brutal acts? One way is for the students and faculty who work in legal clinics to be culturally and historically literate and sensitive. It is critical for those who serve others first to know their own history and culture, and to seek understanding of and show sensitivity to the history and culture of others. Another important value is collaboration. If clinical students and faculty want to help others, we must reach out and seek meaningful collaboration—before such projects are launched, not after.  No one understands what is most needed better than those in need.

One of the panels following the keynote presentation further explored opportunities to advance decolonialization through clinical teaching and advocacy. The panelists offered examples of clinics serving First Nations, Indigenous, and Aboriginal peoples, clinics that address some of the consequences of colonialization (for example, clinics addressing poverty, domestic violence, and women’s issues), and legal strategies that incorporate the colonial discourse and narrative into client advocacy so that the court understands the individual’s actions within a larger historical context.

The conference will continue for the rest of today and tomorrow with a series of panels and speakers exploring topics such as improving access to justice, defining communities in human rights clinics, curricular reform in legal education, the role of clinical legal education in the formation of professional identity in emerging attorneys, and the role of law school clinics in bridging the gap between the academy and the legal profession.

The ACCLE’s next conference will be a joint conference with the International Journal of Clinical Legal Education (IJCLE) at the University of Toronto on July 10-12, 2016. The theme will be “The Risks and Rewards of Clinic.” For more information, please visit We hope to see you there! 

October 23, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Equal Access to Justice Conference, Nov. 12-13, UC-Hastings

Via Prof. Gail Silverstein of UC-Hastings:


University of California Hastings College of the Law, with funding from the Lawrence M. Nagin ’65 Faculty Enrichment Fund, and the Stanford Law School Center on the Legal Profession, in conjunction with the Hastings Law Journal, invite you to attend a Conference on:

Advancing Equal Access to Justice:

Barriers, Dilemmas, and Prospects


November 12 – 13, 2015

University of California, Hastings College of the Law – San Francisco, CA


Addressing inequalities, dysfunctions, and reforms to accessing legal services within the U.S. civil justice system, with an emphasis on California


Keynote Address by Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, California Supreme Court

Opening Remarks by Distinguished Professor Emeritus Joseph Grodin, University of California Hastings College of the Law, and former Associate Justice, California Supreme Court

 MCLE Credit Available


September 30, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Rebellious Lawyering at 25

“Radical lawyering,” I then wrote to myself in field notes, “somehow has to be anchored in the world we’re trying to help change. Built from the ground up. Made a part of what my relatives, friends, and allies do in rebelling against all that has oppressed us and our ancestors, all that seems now still likely to subordinate our descendants. Informed by how we cope and fight and by how we laugh at ourselves. Mindful of how we sometimes get hemmed in and corrupted and deluded by big institutions and tiny habits. Aware of how we sometimes convert apparently insignificant opportunities into important advantages, defiantly making strengths of our weaknesses.”

Gerald López, Introduction, Rebellious Lawyering: One Chicano’s Vision of Progressive Legal Practice (1992).

When I was in law school in the mid-90s, I went to a conference at Yale titled "Rebellious Lawyering." To this day, it was one of the best conferences I have ever attended. It was inspiring, invigorating, and creative, and convinced me that I had found my tribe. The impetus for and foundation of that conference was Gerald López’s influential book Rebellious Lawyering: One Chicano’s Vision of Progressive Legal Practice (1992). 

For years afterwards, I kept the conference poster displayed above my kitchen sink. "Not another cog in the wheel," it proclaimed. The poster remained up even during my eight years as a corporate lawyer when I found a supportive firm (Pillsbury) that allowed me to be a "Rebellious Lawyer," at least in my pro bono work on behalf of children and non profits.

Thus, when I heard about the possibility of a "Rebellious Lawyering" symposium, my ears immediately perked. My tribe was reuniting!

In the ensuing months, the symposium has now come together and will take place on Sunday, May 1, 2016, during the annual AALS Conference on Clinical Legal Education in Baltimore, Maryland. The half-day symposium will include an opening keynote address by Gerald López “reflecting on the major themes of his book and a plenary session immediately following the keynote with clinicians who are interpreting and extending these themes and who will be reflecting on the lessons of Rebellious Lawyering for clinical legal education.” 

Related to the symposium, the Clinical Law Review will be issuing a special Spring 2017 symposium volume, Rebellious Lawyering at Twenty-Five. The issue will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the publication of the book.  

According to the RFP circulated by the Clinical Law Review:

Rarely has a critical text had such a deep and abiding impact on lawyering practice and theory as Gerald López’s Rebellious Lawyering. Lopez’s text (and a group of related works of legal scholarship written during an especially fertile period of critical thinking and writing on poverty law) has inspired generations of lawyers and shaped public interest legal practice since its publication almost 25 years ago. The imperative for lawyers to ally with those mobilizing in poor, immigrant, and communities of color against overpolicing and inequality is as strong today as it has ever been.  

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Rebellious Lawyering, the Clinical Law Review invites the submission of abstracts describing potential full-length articles and essays, as well as shorter comments and dispatches, for inclusion in a symposium issue reflecting on the meaning of the text two-and-a-half decades after its publication.

Authors are encouraged to reflect broadly and critically on rebellious lawyering in general, and the book in particular, to offer case studies, critiques, theoretical amendments, pedagogical insights, and other kinds of engagement with these ideas.  What insights does rebellious lawyering offer us today? How have concepts of rebellious lawyering shaped our practices as lawyers and clinical educators? How do we describe an instance or series of instances of lawyering rebelliously? How have we failed to lawyer rebelliously in a given moment? How does lawyering and legal education today nurture and/or suppress rebellious practice? How can the ideas contained in the text be deepened, updated, reconstituted, extended? In style and substance, we hope for creativity and rebelliousness in the submissions.

Abstracts are due by October 30, 2015. The journal will expect to notify authors of symposium acceptances in November. If you wish to participate in the Clinical Law Review symposium, please email abstracts describing your proposed symposium contribution by October 30, 2015 to  While there is no prescribed length for an abstract, we anticipate that many abstracts will be in the range of 1 - 3 pages. 

If you have any questions about the symposium, please direct them to Sameer Ashar, Chair of the Clinical Law Review’s symposium committee, or to any other symposium committee members:

Amna Akbar,

Sameer Ashar,

Phyllis Goldfarb,

Brenda Smith,

September 29, 2015 in Books, Community Organizing, Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 9, 2015

RFP: Externships 8, March 3-6, 2016 at Cleveland-Marshall (deadline Oct. 2, 2015)

Via Carole O. Heyward:

March 3-6, 2016, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland, Ohio
DEADLINE: Friday, October 2, 2015

Externships 8:

Building on Common Ground: Externships, Clinics and Practice-Based Legal Education
Externships have become a steadily more prominent component of experiential
education, drawing increased attention from the ABA, from scholars and from law
schools. The recently adopted ABA standards on experiential courses chart new paths
for field placement teaching while recent scholarship has produced a new statement of
best practices for externships, resources for teaching externship seminars and works on
outcomes, assessment, and evaluation of student learning. Finally, externship courses
continue to grow in number and to diversify in approach, from full-time
semester-in-practice programs to externship components in traditional classes.

The Externships 8 Conference, to be held March 3-6, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio, will focus
on the roles that externship courses play alongside other forms of experiential legal
education, including in-house clinics and simulation classes. It will address the distinct
features of externship courses, discuss how they relate to other kinds of experiential
courses and explore the many different ways to assess and enhance their unique

The conference will also focus on the fundamentals and best practices of externship
teaching. Separate tracks for new and for experienced externship teachers will offer
both familiar and new ideas on core externship challenges: how to deliver a seminar;
how to train and collaborate with site supervisors; how to teach the skill of reflection
and use it in the course; and how to translate what students learn into transferable skills
and values for the future.


We encourage you to propose a topic that will develop the dual conference themes of
externships’ relationship to other forms of experiential education and best practices in
externship design and delivery. We append to this RFP a list of specific ideas as
prompts for proposals.


Externship teaching involves an increasingly broad range of law school personnel:
tenured or tenure-track faculty; long-term or short-term contract clinicians; part-time
faculty; administrators; field supervisors; career services professionals; and others. The
conference theme focuses on the common ground between externships and other
clinical experiences; accordingly, we invite participation by those who teach in-house
clinics and simulation courses and who are interested in integrating practice-based
learning into the curriculum. We also solicit active participation by international
clinicians, both as participants and presenters.

Proposals for New and Experienced Clinicians

The Organizing Committee expects to offer programming both for those new to field
placement work and for experienced clinicians. We plan to offer sessions in each time
slot that will attract attendees in each group. We ask that you identify which audience
you plan to address – new or experienced or both - in your proposal.

Formats and Publication

The Organizing Committee seeks proposals in several different formats. We solicit
proposals for concurrent sessions to last a full concurrent time slot. We also seek
suggested topics for and facilitators to convene affinity groups, designed for those
attendees who would like to meet with others to discuss common issues. Groups may
form according to geographical region, subject matter (e.g., prosecutorial externships),
or concerns (e.g., ABA issues).

We may also offer sessions consisting of short, “TED Talk-like” presentations of 10 to 20
minutes. We also invite proposals for poster presentations.

Lastly, we welcome proposals to present scholarly works-in-progress, to last 20
minutes. The Clinical Law Review has agreed to consider papers emerging from the
conference (whether from a works-in-progress session or any other conference session)
for publication in a special issue. No guarantee of publication exists; all papers will be
reviewed in accordance with the Clinical Law Review’s normal standards. Potential
authors must submit final drafts of manuscripts no later than June 1, 2016, for

Proposal Selection Criteria

In general, the Organizing Committee will favor proposals that address the conference
theme, are relevant to conference attendees, are well-defined and focused, are timely
and important, and show care and thoughtfulness in development. In addition,
proposals should:

– demonstrate innovation, either in the choice of topic or in the angle of
approach to a familiar topic;

– include presenters who have significant expertise in the topic or a base of
experience that provides a unique or useful vantage point on the topic;

– indicate specifically how the presentation will encourage active learning,
including specific methods for engaging in interaction with the audience; and

– describe how attendees will be offered strategies for implementing new ideas
when they return to their schools.

Finally, we value diversity, both in the composition of presenting teams and in your
topic’s presentation of diversity and inclusiveness as a concern in field placement work.
The Organizing Committee will consider diversity in terms of race, gender, ethnicity,
disability, sexual orientation, geographical location, years of experience, type of school,
type of program and other factors.

Deadlines and Instructions:


We encourage you to contact members of the working group responsible for conference
content to discuss your ideas as you prepare a proposal. This group includes:

Carole O. Heyward,
Bob Jones,
Carolyn Wilkes Kaas,
Alex Scherr,
Beth Schwartz,
Kelly Terry,


This document includes both a cover sheet for proposals and a template for a more
detailed description of the proposal.

Complete the Cover Sheet AND the Detailed Proposal and submit them no later than
Friday, October 2, 2015 to:

By Friday, October 30, 2015, we will notify the contact person for each proposal. We
may contact you sooner to discuss modifications or to suggest collaborations. After
confirming your participation, we will assign a member of the Organizing Committee
to your group to help you to prepare and to assure that your eventual presentation and
materials meet the expectations stated in the criteria for selection.


-- Ideas about best practices in externship teaching.

-- Integration of externship courses into the experiential curriculum, including the
sequencing and scaffolding of externships, in-house clinics and other courses.

-- Distinctive features and opportunities of externships as practice-based education.

-- Participation and status of externship clinicians in law schools, alongside in-house
clinicians and other faculty.

-- Employing externship teaching methods in non-externship classes (e.g., hybrids,
practicums, pop-ups, and add-ons).

-- Working effectively within law schools to promote externships and to secure the
resources necessary for effective program operation.

-- Management of the complex administrative tasks associated with externship courses.

-- “How to” sessions on externship pedagogy, including:

- Student supervision by both site supervisors and externship teachers;

– The classroom experience, both traditional and non-traditional, as a vehicle for
reforming students’ experiences of law school;

– The role of field supervisors as teachers, the training of and ongoing
collaboration with supervisors, and the selection of field placements; and

–Reflective practice as an important aspect of education reform, including
methods for encouraging, teaching and assessing reflection.

--Design and delivery of externship opportunities for students in part-time programs.

–Field placement courses in other countries, and a comparative assessment of those
courses, including differences in cultural, structural and financial pressures.

– The impact of newly revised ABA and state-level standards.

-- The growth, role and administration of semester-away programs.

– The use of technology in field placement programs.

Cover Sheet for Proposal for Externships 8

Send this cover sheet and proposal via e-mail by October 2, 2015 to:

The Organizing Committee will use the information on this cover sheet both to review
proposals and to prepare the conference brochure. Please include a contact person and
the name of all known presenters. We will correspond only with the contact person.

Make sure that all information is complete and accurate.

Please note: Presenters must pay the same conference registration fee as participants.
Program Title:
Contact Person’s Name:
Name of School (as listed in the AALS Directory):
Others Presenters and Schools (as listed in AALS Directory):

Format (check all for which you are willing to have your proposal considered):
_____ Full concurrent session
_____ Workshop/affinity group discussion by geographic region (e.g., urban,
Southeast U.S., international)
_____ Workshop/affinity group discussion by topic or practice area (e.g.,
judicial, criminal defense, semester-away)
_____ Scholarly work-in-progress (20 minutes)
_____ Short presentation (10–20 minutes, TED Talk or similar format)
_____ Poster presentation

New or Experienced Clinicians Track:
_____ New
_____ Experienced
_____ Both

Will you prepare a paper based on your presentation? ____ Yes ____ No

Detailed Proposal for Externships 8


Abstract of your presentation: Describe the content of your presentation. In doing so,
identify the points of innovation in the topic or in your approach and describe the
expertise or experience base of the presenters. For concurrent sessions, specify the
preferred length of the session. We are considering sessions ranging from 60-90
minutes. If you propose to convene a workshop or discussion for an affinity group,
identify the potential participants and the goals for your gathering.

Method of presentation: Describe how you propose to present your material. In doing
so, describe how you will assure active learning by your audience and discuss how you
will provide strategies that attendees may use to implement your ideas when they
return to their schools. Finally, describe any materials you propose to distribute before
or during your presentation.


July 9, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, RFP | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 22, 2015

Southern Clinical Conference Update

Here is an update from the Southern Clinical Conference Planning Committee:

We are touching base with more exciting news about the 2015 Southern Clinical Conference, which will be held at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law on October 22-24, 2015.  First, please be reminded about the July 17, 2015 deadline to submit a proposal for plenary, concurrent, or workshop sessions related to our conference theme of Confronting Issues of Race and Diversity in Clinical Legal Education (see Request for Proposal materials attached to D. Schaffzin e-mail of May 26, 2015).

Apart from plenary, concurrent, and workshop sessions, the 2015 Southern Clinical Conference will also include a time slot dedicated for participants to present works-in-progress.   We invite works-in-progress proposals from new and experienced scholars, on all topics, at all stages of development, from completed drafts to half-baked ideas.  The work-in-progress topic does NOT need to relate in any way to the conference theme.  

We also are looking for volunteer discussants to facilitate dialogue about each work-in-progress project during the sessions.  Work-in-progress presenters will have an opportunity to work with discussants in advance of the conference to tailor the session to meet their goals -- whether receiving detailed feedback on a draft, developing particular ideas, or devising a publication strategy. 

For more information, please consult the attached work-in-progress request for proposals, cover sheet, and template.  

Prospective Work-in-Progress Presenters: please send proposals to Sandra Love ( by August 15th.  

Prospective Work-in-Progress Discussants: please send an email to Sandra Love ( by August 15th indicating your interest and listing any topic areas in which you have a particular interest or expertise.  If you would be open to serving as a discussant with regard to a paper of any topic, please note that, too.

Please contact the Planning Committee if we can be of any assistance.  Work-in-Progress presenters from all regions are welcome.  Join us and present your work in a fun and supportive environment!

 We look forward to your proposals. Registration details and other reminders regarding the Southern Clinical Conference will be coming later this summer.

 Danny (on behalf of the SCC Planning Committee) 


Daniel M.   Schaffzin 
  Assistant   Professor of Law 
  Director of Experiential Learning
  Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law

June 22, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

RFP: Southern Clinical Conference, October 22-24, 2015, in Memphis

Via Danny Schaffzin

Southern Clinical Conference 2015
Request for Proposals
October 22-24, 2015
University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law
Memphis, Tennessee

Confronting Issues of Race and Diversity in Clinical Legal Education

Deadline for Proposals: July 17, 2015

The Planning Committee for the 2015 Southern Clinical Conference invites you to
submit proposals for this year’s conference, which will take place from Thursday
evening, October 22nd, to mid-day Saturday, October 24th, at the University of Memphis
Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law in Memphis, Tennessee. Details on registration and
lodging will follow soon.

The committee is open to receiving proposals for plenaries, concurrents, workshops or
discussions formatted in other ways. The deadline for proposals is July 17, 2015. We
will notify those who make proposals no later than August 14, 2015. A solicitation
for a devoted Works-in-Progress session will go out under separate cover.
We invite proposals that address how to teach and advocate about race and diversity in
clinical education. We encourage applicants to think broadly about this topic. We
solicit proposals from teachers of in-house clinic or externship courses, and other
courses that offer real practice experience.

For example, proposals might focus on any of the following topics:

Programs or initiatives that address racial justice in distinctive or compelling ways.

Responses to the emerging public debate about race relations across the nation,
including the #BlackLivesMatter and other similar movements.

Ways that clinical programs and teachers can leverage their position in two worlds
(the legal academy and law practice) to confront issues of race and diversity.

Specific courses or classes or pedagogical methods that offer effective ways to
introduce race and diversity issues into clinical teaching.

The influence of teaching about race and diversity on clinic design and vice versa
(e.g. choosing long-term vs. one-semester cases; representing groups vs. individuals;
focusing on political vs. litigation vs. transactional strategies; selecting and
sequencing of externship vs. in-house vs. other real practice experiences.)

The distinctive dimensions of confronting race and diversity in a southern historical
and political climate.

The challenge of teaching race and diversity as a pervasive concern, regardless of the
practice areas into which our students will graduate.

Addressing issues of race and diversity as they arise within our law schools and
impact students, faculty, staff, and other internal stakeholders.

The contributions that we, as clinical teachers, can make to a larger discussion of
race through service and scholarship.

The challenges confronted by both newer and more experienced teachers in
integrating race and diversity as topics into newly-created or long-standing courses.

Successful proposals might combine one or more of the suggestions above, or discuss
none of them. We encourage you to think creatively and flexibly in addressing the
conference theme.


In general, the organizing committee will favor proposals that address the conference
theme, are relevant to conference attendees, are well-defined and focused, are timely
and important, and show care and thoughtfulness in development.

We value diversity, both in the composition of presenting teams, and in your topic’s
presentation of diversity as a concern in your work. Diversity includes gender,
ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, geographical location, years of experience, type
of school, type of program and other factors.


Proposals should be submitted by e-mail to Sandra Love ( no later
than July 17, 2015.  Please use this cover sheet and template:  Download Southern Clinical Conference - Cover and Template for Proposals - 2015

Here is the complete RFP for downloading:  Download SCC RFP - FINAL

May 26, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, RFP | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Clinical Law Prof Meet-Up in the Desert: May 6 at 8:30 p.m.

UPDATE:  We're meeting on the patio outside the Fireside Lounge at the Westin.  See you soon.


Friends, Writers, Readers,

The Clinical Law Prof Blog community will gather for an informal, not-hosted, meet up at the AALS Conference on Clinical Legal Education at 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday night, May 6, somewhere in the Westin.   (Watch this space, the Facebook page and @ClinicalLawProf for the location TBD).

It is impossible to plan a gathering that does not conflict with other worthy gatherings at this mighty conference, but if you can, please save the time and join us for conversation, refreshments and pleasantries.  

April 28, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, Food and Drink, Games, Music, Religion, Science, Sports, Travel | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 19, 2015

14th Annual Transactional Clinical Conference: Teaching and Writing Methods of the Transactional Clinician

Via Prof. Alicia Plerhoples


Teaching and Writing Methods of the Transactional Clinician

 This year’s conference theme is “Teaching and Writing Methods of the Transactional Clinician.” 

Conference Date & Location

Friday, April 24, 2015
University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Law (host)
Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO (host partner & location)

This year’s Transactional Clinical Conference will be held on Friday, April 24, 2015.  The Pre-Conference Dinner will be held on Thursday, April 23. We hope to see you at both!



Conference Schedule

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Pre-Conference Dinner

Time: 6:00pm

Location: University of Missouri Kansas City School of Law, Henry W. Bloch Executive Hall for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, 5108 Cherry Street, Kansas City, MO 64110

Friday, April 24, 2015



Time: 8:00am – 4:30pm

Location: Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation,

4801 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110



*Shuttle buses will run to/from hotel to/from dinner on the 23rd and to/from the conference on the 24th

8:00am – 8:30am



Opening Remarks

8:45am – 10:15am

Nuts & Bolts Teaching Plenary

Description: Panelists will work through a pre-arranged hypothetical and present their teaching approaches to the audience. The hypothetical involves clients who ask a transactional clinic for help in facilitating their plans to combat the lack of nutritious food choices and availability in low-income neighborhoods. The clients’ plan includes both commercial and non-commercial activities. The panelists will draw from their varied experiences in entrepreneurship, social justice, and critical legal theory to present their substantive analysis of the hypothetical as well as the pedagogical methods they would use to teach students how to represent the hypothetical clients.

Presenters:Alina Ball (UC Hastings), Jennifer Fan (UW), & Lynnise Pantin (NYSL)

10:15am – 10:30am


10:30am – 11:30am

Nuts & Bolts of Client & Transaction Management

Description: Presentations on teaching students how to (i) build a personal brand, present confidently, and manage client and community relationships, and (ii) manage projects, time, and clients in a corporate practice.

Presenters:Geetha Rao Sant (Wash U), Michelle Sonu (Stanford)

Nuts & Bolts of Collaboration & Interviewing

Description: Presentations on (i) helping students develop effective collaboration skills and (ii) teaching client interviewing using the “fishbowl class client” method.

Presenters: Dana Malkus (St. Louis), Susan R. Jones & Alice Hamilton Evert (GW)


11:30am – 12:30pm


Presentation (12:10pm-12:30pm):John Cummins of iLINC, a consortium of European law school clinics that support European information, communication, and technology start-ups.

12:30pm – 12:45pm


12:45pm – 1:45pm

Nuts & Bolts of Client Counseling

Description: Presentations on teaching students client counseling through practice simulations. Student learning objectives for counseling include (i) understanding the client’s perspective / frame, (ii) effectively communicating risks, benefits, and uncertainty, and (iii) mastering verbal and presentation skills.

Presenters: Priya Baskaran (Georgetown), Naveen Thomas (NYU)

Nuts & Bolts of Client Communication

Description:  Interactive discussion on teaching students (i) oral communication and public speaking skills, and (ii) how to compose client-centered emails, manage ethical issues that arise through email correspondence, and manage client relationships through email correspondence.

Presenters: Frances Martinez & Heather Way (Texas), Jeff Ward (Duke)

Scholarship: Why, What, Where, and How?

Description:This moderated panel will focus on publication of scholarship by transactional law clinicians. Panelists will discuss: (i) what type of scholarship to write; (ii) writing strategies; (iii) where to publish and what audiences to reach; (iv) how scholarship impacts tenure and promotion; and (v) topical areas of growth in scholarship written by transactional clinicians.

Panelists:Jim Kelly (Notre Dame), Dana Thompson (Michigan), Susan R. Jones (GW), Paul Tremblay (BC)

Moderator:Tony Luppino (UMKC)

1:45pm – 2:00pm


2:00pm – 3:00pm

Nuts & Bolts of Drafting Organizational Documents

Description:  Presentations on teaching (i) limited liability company formation and drafting operating agreements, and (ii) drafting organizational documents for nonprofit and for-profit ventures.

Presenters: Katherine Moyer & Mindy Wittkop (Oregon), Jim Kelly (Notre Dame)


Nuts & Bolts of Contract Drafting and Managing Future Risks

Description:Presentations on (i) telling science fiction stories as a technique to draft contracts and consider future risks, and (ii) introducing contract drafting and other transactional skills into a non-clinical business associations course.

Presenters: Michael Haber (Hofstra), Constance Wagner (St. Louis)


Nuts & Bolts of Engaging Communities

Description:  Presentations on (i) the four stages of the community building process and teaching community building skills, and  (ii) teaching client-lawyering in the context of a rural land use clinic where clients’ preferences often differ from students’ values.

Presenters: Paula Williams (Tennessee), Katherine Garvey (WVU)

3:00pm – 3:15pm


3:15pm – 4:30pm

Pen & Paper Workshop

Description:Presenters will share their works-in-progress. The format of the panel will consist of “rocket panels” during which each presenter will give his or her elevator pitch, speaking for no more than 10 minutes. The presenters will then engage in Q&A and receive feedback from the audience. Draft papers will be distributed prior to the conference, and it is recommended but not required that audience participants read the papers prior to the panel.


-          Patience Crowder (Denver), Contracting for Complexity: Collective Impact Agreements and Regional Equity

-          Edward De Barbieri (Brooklyn), Community Benefits Agreements in Land Use and Economic Development Approvals

-          Seletha R. Butler (Georgia Institute of Tech), Conceptualize Governing with the Ethic of Care and Justice  

March 19, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Igniting Law Teaching 2015 this Friday in D.C.

I am so excited to be boarding a plane in the morning to participate in LegalED's Igniting Law Teaching 2015 on Friday, March 20, 2015, at American University Washington College of Law.  CALI is a co-sponsor of the event. Live viewing will be available by webcast or, if you are in the region, join us in person by registering here: Registration.

The conference will feature talks by 35 law school academics and practitioners from the US, Canada and England – including several clinicians -- in a TEDx-styled conference to share ideas on teaching methodologies.  LegalED’s Teaching Pedagogy video collection includes many of the talks from last year’s conference, which have been viewed collectively more than 5000 times.

 The panels for this year include: Law Teaching for the 21st Century, Applying Learning Theory to Legal Education, The Art and Craft of Law Teaching, Using Technological Tools for Legal Education, and Pathways to Practice.

The Igniting Law Teaching conference is unlike other gatherings of law professors.  Here, talks will be styled as TEDx Talks, with each speaker on stage alone, giving a well scripted and performed talk about an aspect of law school pedagogy.  In the end, we will create a collection of short videos on law school-related pedagogy that will inspire innovation and experimentation by law professors around the country, and the world, to bring more active learning and practical skills training into the law school curriculum.  The videos will be available for viewing by the larger academic community on LegalED, a website developed by a community of law professors interested in using online technologies to facilitate more active, problem-based learning in the classroom, in addition to better assessment and feedback.

I hope you can join us on March 20th, either live or virtually

March 18, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, Teaching and Pedagogy, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

2015 New Clinicians Conference: May 4, Rancho Mirage, California

 The Clinical Legal Education Association Announces

2015 New Clinicians Conference

Monday, May 4, 2015

Westin Mission Hills, Rancho Mirage, California

CLEA’s biennial New Clinicians Conference (NCC) will take place May 4th at the Westin Mission Hills Resort in Rancho Mirage, California, also the location of the 2015 AALS Clinical Conference.

The full-day NCC program will begin with breakfast at 8 AM and will include multiple plenary and facilitated small group sessions, as well as break-out sessions.  The last session will conclude no later than 5 PM.

Thanks to the generous financial support provided by UCLA School of Law, Pepperdine School of Law, and the authors of Transforming the Education of Lawyers, The Theory and Practice of Clinical Pedagogy – Sue Bryant, Elliott Milstein, and Ann Shalleck – the NCC registration fee this year is only $50.



Registration for the NCC is separate from the AALS Clinical Conference.  The $50 registration fee includes a one-year CLEA membership, CLEA’s New Clinicians Handbook, a full day of programs, and meals (breakfast, lunch, and mid-afternoon snack).

Online Registration

The registration form can be completed on the CLEA website at:

Credit cards may be used through a PayPal link found on the website.

Payment by Check:

If you prefer to pay the $50 registration fee by check, please register first on the CLEA website and then mail your check (payable to “Clinical Legal Education Association”) to:

Professor Beth Schwartz

Fordham University School of Law

150 West 62nd St. Room 9-102

New York, NY 10023

If you have any questions, please contact:  Benjie Louis ( or Beth Schwartz (

March 18, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 27, 2015


Dear Colleagues, 

On behalf of the site selection committee (Liz Solar, Ann Vessels, Lisa Smith, Nancy Maurer, Danny Schaffzin and myself), I am very excited to announce that Cleveland-Marshall College of Law will be hosting Externships 8.  The conference will be held in Cleveland, Ohio! 

We want to thank all of the schools who applied to host Externships 8.  We considered a variety of factors including ease of access for participants, diversity of location, prior interest, and resources available to the host school. ​The proposals that we received were excellent and showed a level of commitment to and engagement in the externship community that is truly outstanding.

We look forward to having a terrific conference in Cleveland, Ohio.  For those of you who don't know, Cleveland was recently named to: 1) the New York Times List of 52 Places to Visit in 2015; 2) Fodor’s Go List 2015; 3) Travel & Leisure’s Best Places to Travel in 2015; and, 4) the LA Times 15 Destinations for 2015. 

Further details will be forthcoming.  In the meantime, if you have any questions, please contact:

Carole O. Heyward
Director of Engaged Learning
Clinical Professor of Law
Cleveland-Marshall College of Law
Phone: 216.687.5508

Your AALS Externship Section Chairs, 

Inga Laurent and Lisa Smith

February 27, 2015 in Clinic News, Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Clinical Law Review’s Clinical Writers’ Workshop: September 26, 2015, NYU

Via Kate Kruse:

The Clinical Law Review will hold its next Clinical Writers’ Workshop on Saturday, September 26, 2015, at NYU Law School. The registration deadline is June 30, 2015.

The Workshop will provide an opportunity for clinical teachers who are writing about any subject (clinical pedagogy, substantive law, interdisciplinary analysis, empirical work, etc.) to meet with other clinicians writing on related topics to discuss their works-in-progress and brainstorm ideas for further development of their articles. Attendees will meet in small groups organized, to the extent possible, by the subject matter in which they are writing. Each group will “workshop” the draft of each member of the group.

Participation in the Workshop requires the submission of a paper because the workshop takes the form of small group sessions in which all members of the group comment on each other’s manuscripts. By June 30, all applicants will need to submit a mini-draft or prospectus, 3-5 pages in length, of the article they intend to present at the workshop.  Full drafts of the articles will be due by September 1, 2015.

As in the previous Clinical Law Review Workshops, participants will not have to pay an admission or registration fee but participants will have to arrange and pay for their own travel and lodging. To assist those who wish to participate but who need assistance for travel and lodging, NYU Law School has created a fund for scholarships to help pay for travel and lodging. The scholarships are designed for those clinical faculty who receive little or no travel support from their law schools and who otherwise would not be able to attend this conference without scholarship support. Applicants for scholarships will be asked to submit, with their 3-5 page prospectus, by June 30, a proposed budget for travel and lodging and a brief statement of why the scholarship would be helpful in supporting their attendance at this conference.  The Board will review all scholarship applications and issue decisions about scholarships in early July. The scholarships are conditioned upon recipients’ meeting all requirements for workshop participation, including timely submission of drafts, and will be capped at a maximum of $750 per person.

Information about the Workshop – including the Registration form, scholarship application form, and information for reserving hotel rooms – is available on-line at:

If you have any comments or suggestions you would like to send us, we would be very happy to hear from you. Comments and suggestions should be sent to Randy Hertz at

February 19, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

SAVE THE DATE: CLEA New Clinicians Conference, May 4, 2015

Via Beth Schwartz and Benjie Louis, Co-Chairs of CLEA’s New Clinicians Committee:

The Clinical Legal Education Association will be holding its full-day New Clinicians Conference on Monday, May 4, 2015, immediately before the start of the AALS Clinical Conference at the Westin Mission Hills in Rancho Mirage, CA.  Please make your travel plans accordingly for what will be an exciting and insightful conference.  Registration information is forthcoming. 




February 4, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Conference: Engaging the Entire Class: Strategies for Enhancing Participation and Inclusion in Law School Classroom Learning

Via Prof. Kelly Terry of UALR and the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning:

Engaging the Entire Class - Strategies for Enhancing Participation and Inclusion in Law School Classroom Learning

From the website: 

The UCLA School of Law and the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning (ILTL) present a one day teaching workshop conference in which all law faculty (full-time and part-time) can learn more about developing techniques for engaging diverse and distracted law students.  Each workshop session will be presented by a teacher featured in the recent Harvard University Press book, What the Best Law Teachers Do.

Date: 02/28/2015
Time: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Location: UCLA School of Law, Room 1357

January 13, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, Teaching and Pedagogy | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Reflections on AALS 2015

There are few better ways to start the New Year than with a smooth, slow descent over the Potomac at night with the Capitol and the Washington Monument illuminated in the distance. It provides a few moments to reflect on the past year, and to try to envision what we need to do to ensure that our students, children, and grandchildren have the same professional, personal, and economic opportunities with which we ourselves have been blessed. Our world is changing. 

In 2014, the China overcame the United States as the world’s leading economy. But don’t worry. We still have a number of other distinctions. For example, we continue to lead the world in environmental pollution per capita (China leads when measured by total volume). We also remain the world’s largest military power. In fact, our military spending is more than the next ten highest military spending countries combined. We also are far ahead when it comes to the percentage of our population in prison (700 inmates per 100,000 people), and the U.S. population continues to experience the greatest inequality in the world among developed nations. We remain a world leader in some ways, unfortunately. 

So when I walked into the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting boasting the title, “Legal Education at the Crossroads,” I was hopeful that there would be discussions rich and lively focusing on the ways that we, as legal educators, can provide leadership—through scholarship, teaching, and service—to a nation in decline. The crisis that we are witnessing in legal education is not unique to us. But our opportunity is. Would we embrace it, I wondered?

A “Hot Topic/Bridge Program” focused on our nation’s racial issues kicked off the annual meeting on Saturday, but as I talked to colleagues from around the country in the hallways of the Wardman Park Hotel, I heard tales of lukewarm responses by many law schools to racial inequality issues, and at least one tenured colleague at a Midwestern law school told me of her experience being aggressively criticized by her law school administration for providing legal advice to students who were arrested during Ferguson-related protests.

As I sought panels and presentations focused on diversity, inclusivity, and justice, I was greeted with a variety of sessions focused on overcoming persistent discrimination in legal academia, strategies for nurturing diverse leaders in law schools, and the identification of higher education as a public good whose integrity must be protected from the widespread corporatization of America and transformation of our democracy (at least ideally) into a plutocracy. But, at times, even these disappointed as some panelists conveyed a deep entrenchment in a defensive position of academic entitlement that none of us can afford to embrace.

This is not 1973 and none of us is Professor Kingsfield. No longer can we stand at the podium and look down at our students, assured that both their futures and ours are assured. They are not. Law school teaching in the 21st century requires us to stand next to our students, and to partner with them. Our success is tied to theirs, as is America’s. If we cannot effectively and efficiently train the next generation of attorneys to understand the rule of law without burying them in massive debt, they will be unable to promote and passionately defend that same rule of law, which underpins our entire civilization.

Instead of asking these big questions, many discussions focused on travel funding and course loads and the potential of externships to save us from our obligation to create “practice ready” law school graduates. Don’t get me wrong. I had a fabulous time hearing marriage advice from Justice Ginsburg and getting a hug from Anita Hill—two of my heroines. But when the excitement of legal celebrity sightings wears off, I couldn’t help but return to room number 4216, and wonder how many more smooth landings I will be able to enjoy over the Potomac. There seems to be rough weather ahead, at least to me.              

January 7, 2015 in Conferences and Meetings, Teaching and Pedagogy | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Igniting Law Teaching 2015

LegalEd is now accepting proposals for Igniting Law Teaching 2015, which is scheduled for March 19 and 20, 2015, at American University Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C. All proposals must be received by January 15, 2015.

Igniting Law Teaching 2015 is not a traditional law conference. Participants prepare 5-10 minute engaging presentations on legal education in TedX-style formats that will be digitally recorded and distributed online on the Legal Ed website, which can be found here. Igniting Law Teaching 2014 produced nearly three dozen legal education videos from professors all over the country, including a number of clinical professors. The recordings have been viewed hundreds of times by law school faculty, administrators, students, and alumni both in the U.S. and abroad, and the Journal of Legal Education is devoting an entire issue (Spring 2015) to the research underlying the 2014 Ignite Law Teaching recordings.  

If you are interested in modernizing legal education to make it more effective, efficient, and relevant, I encourage you to consider participating in the 2015 Ignite Law Teaching event. More information about the event and submitting a proposal can be found here.

December 10, 2014 in Conferences and Meetings, Teaching and Pedagogy | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Proposals Due January 15 for GAJE's 8th Worldwide Conference

As you get ready to swap out your 2014 calendar for your 2015 calendar, make sure that you note that proposals for presentations at GAJE's 8th Worldwide Conference are due January 15, 2015. The conference will be taking place at Anadolu University in Eskişehir, Turkey, from
22 July through 28 July, 2015. More information can be found at  The general theme is "Justice Education for a Just Society" with eight streams ranging from regional and international collaboration to innovations in justice education to creating clinics that are sustainable. The conference will be combined with the 2015 Conference of the International Journal of Clinical Legal Education. A limited number of grants will be made available to participants from developing countries. Grant applications are also due by January 15.

I hope to see you in Eskişehir next July!


December 9, 2014 in Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Institute for Law Teaching and Learning Spring Conferences

There are some incredible conferences on the horizon!  Below is some information about two from the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning.  

Don’t forget to save the date for two spring conferences: February 28, 2015, Engaging the Entire Class—Strategies for Enhancing Participation and Inclusion in Law School Classroom Learning (see the announcement below) at UCLA; and June 13-14, 2015, Experiential Learning Across the Curriculum, at Gonzaga University School of Law, Spokane, WA.  The details, call for proposals, and registration information for the June conference will be forthcoming. 

The Institute for Law Teaching and Learning is partnering with UCLA Law School for a Spring 2015 conference, featuring five professors from the What the Best Law Teachers Do book.  See below for conference announcement, we'll be back in touch with registration and accommodation information, and we hope to see you in sunny LA next February!

Engaging the Entire Class—Strategies for Enhancing Participation and Inclusion in Law School Classroom Learning

Institute for Law Teaching and Learning

Spring Conference 2015

Saturday, February 28, 2015

 The UCLA School of Law and the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning (ILTL) are collaborating to present a one-day conference in Los Angeles on February 28, 2015. The conference theme is:  “Engaging the Entire Class—Strategies for Enhancing Participation and Inclusion in Law School Classroom Learning.”

Conference Structure:  The conference will include an opening and closing led by ILTL Co-Directors and Consultants, and five workshop sessions. Each workshop session will be presented by a teacher featured in What the Best Law Teachers Do. 

Conference Presenters: Workshop presenters include:

Patti Alleva (University of North Dakota)

Steve Friedland (Elon University)

Steven Homer (University of New Mexico)

Nancy Levit (University of Missouri – Kansas City)

Hiroshi Motomura (UCLA) 

By the end of the conference, participants will have concrete ideas for enhancing participation and inclusion in law school classrooms to take back to their students, colleagues, and institutions.

Registration and accommodation information forthcoming.

Looking forward to seeing all of you in UCLA and/or Spokane!


September 30, 2014 in Clinic News, Conferences and Meetings | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 29, 2014

Call for Papers: Conference on Advancing Equal Access to Justice: Barriers, Dilemmas, and Prospects

Conference on Advancing Equal Access to Justice: Barriers, Dilemmas, and Prospects

University of California Hastings College of the Law and Stanford Center on the Legal Profession, Stanford Law School

November 12-13, 2015

San Francisco, California

Conference Scope and Purpose

This conference has both scholarly and practical objectives. Its focus is on identifying and redressing inequalities and dysfunctions within the United States civil justice system, with a particular emphasis on California. We are seeking papers that enhance our empirical and conceptual understandings of the most pressing short-term and long-term challenges affecting the accessibility, availability, and quality of civil legal assistance and representation for low and middle income individuals. We are especially interested in papers that propose specific civil justice policy and practice reforms and that critically examine not only direct benefits and costs but also potential overall societal and institutional consequences. We also want to review papers that rely on empirical research and/or new conceptual insights for critiquing and improving or altering our traditional legal processes and mechanisms including but not solely limited to courts. In meeting these objectives, we invite studies and proposals from abroad and other states as well as ones now being undertaken in California. In addition to the usual participants in discussions concerning access to justice, our target audience for the conference includes judges, legislators, other public officials, bar leaders, community activists from business, labor, minority, and grassroots organizations, and interested lawyers and academic colleagues.

Conference Format

The conference will take place over 1 ½ days. There will be opening, first-day luncheon, and closing luncheon speakers. The bulk of the program will consist of panel presentations and follow-up small group discussions. In this announcement, we are inviting proposals for research papers for panel presentations.

We anticipate that there will be three sequential panel sessions: The first will focus on proposals for making lawyers available at less or no cost; the second will examine ideas for improving self-help assistance and expanding the roles of non-lawyers; and the third will address issues concerning underlying political and legal conditions implicated when seeking to reform our civil justice system and potential short-term and long-term institutional consequences were specific reforms to become operational.

Each panel will have a moderator, two paper presenters, and a commentator. The moderator will be someone who is familiar with the specific subject matter and can place the research and reforms suggested into an overall framework for thinking about equal access to justice concerns. In reviewing panel presentation submissions, we hope to have proposals that collectively utilize a range of empirical and non-empirical research methodologies. The role of the fourth member on the panel will not be to counter what has been presented but to raise additional issues and concerns to be considered during the subsequent small group discussions.

Potential Research Paper Themes

We invite proposals on topics of your own framing consistent with the conference’s general purpose. Illustrative of our more particular concerns, we set forth below several specific themes and issues grouped by proposed panel presentation session. We are not seeking to cover all these matters but rather offer them as examples of potential research topics. As noted above, we anticipate only two research paper presentations at each panel session.

A. Availability and Accessibility of Lawyers

1. Techniques and limitations regarding the encouragement and provision of pro bono and low fee counsel: E.g., mandatory pro bono reporting; conditioned early admission to the bar; post-law school incubators through various organizations including law schools; overcoming lawyer-supply/client-demand discrepancies and inefficiencies.

2. Civil Gideon and fallback measures: E.g., constitutional and statutory prospects and obstacles; quantitative and qualitative reports on the benefits, costs, and effectiveness of targeted and limited expansion of the right to civil counsel within California and from other states and abroad; perspectives and approaches for determining when having a lawyer is likely to be most efficacious for clients and how to measure the utility or value of having a lawyer.

3. Legal aid practice and funding: E.g., precariousness of governmental, foundation and charitable funding; evaluating IOLTA programs; developing new sources of funding; rethinking client criteria for receiving free legal assistance; assessing the barriers to and benefits and costs of utilizing advances in legal technology.

B. Self-Help and Non-Lawyer or Mixed Models for Providing Legal Services

1. Restructuring legal practice: E.g., authorizing for-profit, nonprofessional corporations as providers of legal services; unbundling of legal services; establishing limited licensure; revising related ethical rules, principles and values; evaluating the quality, feasibility and costs of services provided through legal insurance and by entities such as LegalZoom; critically examining assumptions regarding the insufficient availability and uneven distribution of lawyers.

2. Triaging legal services—where, when, how and for whom: E.g., developing standards for determining who gets what kind of service; measuring the impact of differentiated types of service; establishing and evaluating screening and referral mechanisms; rethinking the roles of judges and non-judicial personnel at the courthouse; drawing on lessons from the healthcare profession.

3. Improving self-help measures: E.g., examining client self-awareness of potential civil law situations; evaluating the effectiveness of online programs that provide referral or substantive information, downloadable forms, or formal documents filing; assessing developments in legal self-help publishing.

C. Underlying Structural and Consequential Institutional Implications

1. The relationship of the justice gap to inequalities of income and demographic differences: E.g., measuring the justice gap; comparing outcomes in family law or other selected subject areas taking into account the availability of counsel or the lack thereof and also income status; tracking the accessibility and quality of legal assistance by race, ethnicity, gender and geography; ethical and social implications of an existing and/or widening justice gap; redressing language, cultural and disability barriers.

2. Societal and institutional consequences of shifting away from resolving disputes in adversarial and/or public proceedings: E.g., examining the jurisprudential and political effects of such a shift presently and prospectively; comparing due process protections and equality imbalances in adversarial and inquisitorial proceedings drawing on court case studies from abroad and administrative agency examples domestically; weighing the jurisprudential and practical effects of trial judges assuming an enhanced role as legal and social services facilitators; re-conceptualizing and reconfiguring the courthouse as a place for seeking legal assistance and related services; identifying and assessing the impacts of such changes for law schools and legal education.


Individuals interested in presenting a research and/or policy reform panel session paper should submit a prospectus summary of no more than a 1000 words describing the paper’s proposed topic, themes, and research methodologies by no later than Wednesday, November 12, 2014. This summary should be sent as an email attachment to the conference organizers— Mark Aaronson, Juliet Brodie, Joseph Grodin, Deborah Rhode, Lucy Ricca, Gail Silverstein, and Nancy Stuart

A near-final draft of the paper, for review by the conference organizers and program speakers and panel participants, will be due on Monday, October 5, 2015. Travel expenses will be paid for individuals whose papers are selected for presentation at the conference. There is also the prospect that the papers presented will be considered for publication in a symposium issue of the Hastings Law Journal or Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly.

September 29, 2014 in Conferences and Meetings, RFP | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Clinical Law Review Writers' Workshop a Success!

Flights across the U.S. were snarled on Friday due to a fire affecting O’Hare, but system-wide flight cancellations and delays could not keep nearly 100 clinical faculty members from descending on NYU School of Law yesterday for a scholarship boot camp experience, but with kinder, gentler drill sergeants.  The annual event aims to support clinical faculty at all levels in their scholarship endeavors. 

As every clinical professor knows, publishing regularly is especially challenging in light of the significant supervision and practice-related responsibilities inherent in our positions.  The Clinical Law Review Workshop was created to help support clinical faculty in overcoming those challenges in order to become and remain high quality scholars.  The workshop is organized around small, thematically-focused groups.  This year there were fifteen groups ranging in topics from business law to juvenile justice to tax law.  All participants apply to participate in the late spring and commit to complete a draft of their articles by September 1, when they exchange drafts with their group members.  They read one another’s drafts closely and then spend most of the day together offering constructive critiques, asking provoking questions, and sharing thoughtful suggestions to help take each paper to the next level.  Every group is moderated by a more senior clinical faculty member with significant publishing experience.

At the end of the day, all of the participants come together for a gloves-off  session providing tips on how to keep writing and place the papers that will soon be finished.  Kate Kruse of Hamline presented the results of a study by Robert Boice on scholarly productivity that showed that professors who wrote every single day produced four times as much scholarship as a control group who wrote in blocks of time (64 pages versus 17 pages).  Those who wrote daily AND were accountable to another person for reporting their writing time were over nine times as productive as those who wrote in blocks of time (157 pages versus 17 pages).  Michele Gilman of Baltimore reviewed the submission cycle, submission strategies, and provided links to resources such as Writing for and Publishing in Law Reviews found here and a law review template to format one’s article before submission.  She even explained the influential power and significance of the asterisk footnote and why one might consider denoting on one’s CV or professional biography when one is writing for a symposium issue.

This is my ninth year as a professor and the second time I have participated in the Clinical Law Review Workshop—first as a junior professor and now as a mid-level professor.  Both times I received feedback that fundamentally changed the scope and framing of my research and learned submission and publication tips and strategies that I believe have and will continue to make a difference in my scholarship.  I will be back.

There are few professional experiences that are as positive and invigorating as a day immersed in our national and international clinical community—participants came from Croatia, Brazil, Poland, Arizona, Wyoming, D.C., Texas, Florida, Massachusetts, and many more.  As Mary Helen McNeal of Syracuse University observed on the clinic listserv today, ours is an especially “supportive and caring community.”  The Clinical Writer’s Workshop, under the leadership of Randy Hertz of NYU, is an annual reminder that these values and attitudes are not limited to how we treat our students and clients, nor is it limited to our teaching and supervision--it is how we treat one other and our scholarship.

If you have not yet participated in the Clinical Writer’s Workshop or have not done so recently, I strongly encourage you to keep an eye out for the application information next spring.  Keep in mind that, historically, the event has been free thanks to the generosity of NYU School of Law and there have even been a limited number of scholarships available to help offset travel costs, which helps to ensure that the workshop is affordable and inclusive.    

In the meanwhile, keep writing every day, remember to create accountability for your writing time with a friend or colleague, and know that there is a large and caring community here to support you, not just with your teaching and supervision, but with your scholarship as well.

September 28, 2014 in Conferences and Meetings, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)