Tuesday, July 10, 2012

SCOTUSblog Online Symposium on Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum

SCOTUSblog has started an online symposium discussing Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, which will be reargued in the Supreme Court this fall. Here’s a brief introduction by Kali Borkoski. To keep track of the new contributions as they get posted, head here. The guest contributors include:

  • Donald Childress – Pepperdine School of Law
  • Sarah Cleveland – Columbia Law School
  • Anthony Colangelo – SMU Dedman School of Law
  • Susan Farbstein – Harvard Law School
  • Meir Feder – Jones Day
  • Oona Hathaway – Yale Law School
  • Eugene Kontorovich – Northwestern School of Law
  • Julian Ku – Hofstra Law School
  • Michael Ramsey – University of San Diego Law School
  • Beth Stephens – Rutgers School of Law
  • Ingrid Wuerth – Vanderbilt Law School

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July 10, 2012 in Conferences/Symposia, Supreme Court Cases, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Malveaux on Sullivan on Iqbal and Employment Discrimination

Now available on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is an essay by Prof. Suzette Malveaux (Catholic University) entitled Plausibility Pleading and Employment Discrimination. It reviews a recent article by Prof. Charles Sullivan (Seton Hall), Plausibly Pleading Employment Discrimination, 52 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 1613 (2011). The review begins:

In a sea of law review articles analyzing the potential impact of the more rigorous federal pleading standard of Ashcroft v. Iqbal, Charles Sullivan’s Plausibly Pleading Employment Discrimination stands out for a number of reasons.  As an initial matter, Sullivan grapples with an important question plaguing the civil rights community and the employment bar: does Swierkiewicz v. Sorema—the unanimous 2002 opinion that took a lenient approach to pleading discrimination cases—remain good law post-Iqbal?  Sullivan argues that Iqbal did not overturn Swierkiewicz, leaving intact the ability of plaintiffs to plead employment discrimination without alleging a prima facie case under the McDonnell Douglas test.

But Sullivan then considers the alternate view: assuming arguendo that Iqbal did overrule Swierkiewicz, what should plaintiffs do to avoid dismissal for failure to state a claim under this more rigorous pleading regime?  Sullivan offers a variety of approaches, each with strengths and weaknesses. This willingness to explore the proverbial edge of the envelope makes this article a compelling read.  It combines pragmatism, creativity, and boldness at a time when many are struggling to make sense of the impact of the new federal pleadings standard in the civil rights arena.  Given the importance of pleadings as an access to justice issue, this article provides an invaluable perspective.

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May 29, 2012 in Recent Scholarship, Twombly/Iqbal, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Campos on Brown on Specious Claims & Global Settlements

Now available on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is an essay by Prof. Sergio Campos (Miami) entitled Striking Out Specious Claims in Mass Tort Global Settlements. It reviews a forthcoming article by Prof. S. Todd Brown (SUNY Buffalo), Specious Claims and Global Settlements.

The review begins:

The late Richard Nagareda once noted that global settlements in mass tort litigation present a “Field of Dreams” problem – “if you build it, they will come.”  In the movie, people came to the Iowa baseball field in the corn fields because it was “money they had, but peace they lacked.”  The opposite is true in mass tort litigation.  In most cases, multinational corporations and plaintiffs’ firms with large inventories of claims typically achieve peace through a global settlement resolving all of the victims’ claims.  It is money that the individual victims lack, and it is why the victims consistently come in droves, many with claims that are specious at best.  In his excellent article Specious Claims and Global Settlements, Todd Brown examines three comprehensive settlements in mass tort litigation to identify the cause of the “Field of Dreams” problem.

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May 1, 2012 in Class Actions, Recent Scholarship, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

More Civ Pro Video

We covered earlier the Full Faith & Credit video from the Columbia Law Revue, which won a narrow victory in Above The Law’s Law Revue Video Contest.

Now comes a video, courtesy of the 2012 Emory Law Follies, that features civil procedure prof Rich Freer expertly channeling Michael Bolton (and others):

 

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(Hat Tip: Thom Main)

April 25, 2012 in Film, Music, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Law Revue Land Shows Some Love For Civil Procedure

Video here. And it's one of the finalists for Above The Law's Law Revue Video Contest.

Parental Advisory

(Hat tip: Chris Newman)

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April 19, 2012 in Film, Music, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

More Kiobel Coverage

Lots of coverage on Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, which is being argued today:

One issue that isn’t squarely raised by the questions presented is whether the Alien Tort Statute applies to claims brought by one alien against another (as in Kiobel). Amanda Frost’s Academic Round-up for SCOTUSblog covers an essay by Anthony Bellia and Bradford Clark, which argues that the Alien Tort Statute applies only to claims brought by an alien against a U.S. citizen. Marco Simons has a response on Concurring Opinions.

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February 28, 2012 in In the News, Recent Scholarship, Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Supreme Court Cases, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 27, 2012

Hoffman on Hubbard on Preservation Under the Federal Rules

Now available on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is an essay by Prof. Lonny Hoffman (Houston) entitled A Modest Proposal on Preservation. It reviews an article by Prof. William Hubbard (Chicago), Preservation Under the Federal Rules: Accounting for the Fog, the Pyramid, and the Sombrero.

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February 27, 2012 in Discovery, Recent Scholarship, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Tidmarsh on Resnik on Concepcion, Wal-Mart, Turner v. Rogers

Now available on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is an essay by Prof. Jay Tidmarsh (Notre Dame) entitled Access to Courts and the Democratic Order. It reviews a recent article by Prof. Judith Resnik (Yale), Fairness in Numbers: A Comment on AT&T v. Concepcion, Wal-Mart v. Dukes, and Turner v. Rogers, 125 Harv. L. Rev. 78 (2011), covered earlier here.

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January 31, 2012 in Recent Scholarship, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Is the end of class actions upon us?

That’s the title of this contribution by Professor Brian Fitzpatrick (Vanderbilt) to SCOTUSblog’s arbitration symposium. The other contributions are worth a look too.

SCOTUSblog’s symposium on arbitration comes on the heels of its class action symposium (covered earlier here).

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September 14, 2011 in Class Actions, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Announcement and Call for Papers: 4th Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop

Florida International University College of Law is hosting the Fourth Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop in Miami on February 2 - 4, 2012. From the announcement:

The workshop pairs a senior scholar with a panel of junior scholars presenting works-in-progress. Five senior scholars have confirmed participation this year: Susan Bandes (University of Miami), Lee Epstein (USC), Theodore Eisenberg (Cornell University), Martin Redish (Northwestern University), and Suzanna Sherry (Vanderbilt University). . . .

The workshop is open to non-tenured and recently tenured academics who teach and write in Federal Courts, Civil Rights Litigation, and associated topics. Those who do not currently hold a faculty appointment but expect to do so beginning in fall 2012 are welcome. The program is also open to scholars wanting to attend, read, and comment on papers but not present. There is no registration fee. . . .

Those wishing to present a paper must submit an Abstract by November 15. Papers will be selected by a committee of past participants; presenters will be notified by December 10. Those planning to attend must register by January 10, 2012. The program is also open to non-presenters who want to attend, read and comment on papers, and participate in the discussion.

More details available at PrawfsBlawg.

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(Hat Tip: Howard Wasserman)

September 13, 2011 in Conferences/Symposia, Federal Courts, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 12, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Charlotte

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from the Charlotte School of Law. One area of need is civil procedure.

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September 12, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 9, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Drexel

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from Drexel University Earle Mack School of Law. One area of need is Civil Procedure.

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September 9, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Welcome Guest Blogger Brendan Maher

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Brendan Maher as a guest-blogger for the month of September. Brendan is an Assistant Professor of Law at Oklahoma City University School of Law (and not to be confused with the famous Irish hurler).

Brendan teaches Civil Procedure and Evidence, and his wide-ranging scholarship runs the gamut from ERISA to Federal Courts to Health Care to Mixed Martial Arts (see here and here).

Great to have you on board, Brendan!

August 31, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

SCOTUSblog Class Action Symposium

Beginning today, SCOTUSblog is hosting a symposium on the future of class action lawsuits. From the introductory post:

In the wake of several recent decisions from the Court – such as Wal-Mart v. Dukes, AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, and Smith v. Bayer– involving class actions, SCOTUSblog has solicited posts from experts in the field to the effects that these decisions (as well as others relating to class actions) will have on cases that are currently pending in the lower courts, as well as the future of class action lawsuits more generally.

We are grateful to our contributors, who are listed below, for their hard work:

  • Sergio Campos, University of Miami School of Law
  • Sarah Crawford, National Partnership for Women and Families
  • Scott Dodson, William & Mary Law School
  • Allen Erbsen, University of Minnesota Law School
  • Ted Frank, Center for Class Action Fairness, LLC
  • J. Russell Jackson, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP
  • Paul Karlsgodt, Baker Hostetler
  • Charles Silver, University of Texas Law School
  • Andrew J. Trask, McGuire Woods

Links to the symposium posts will be available here.

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August 30, 2011 in Class Actions, Conferences/Symposia, Supreme Court Cases, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Oregon

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from the University of Oregon School of Law. One area of need is civil litigation.

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August 25, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 22, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Tulane

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from Tulane Law School. One area of need is civil procedure.

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August 22, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 19, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Oklahoma

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from the University of Oklahoma College of Law. One area of need is Civil Procedure.

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August 19, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Temple

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from Temple University James E. Beasley School of Law. One area of need is Civil Procedure.

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August 18, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Faculty Hiring Announcement: Syracuse

The Faculty Lounge has posted a hiring announcement from Syracuse University. One area of need is civil procedure.

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August 17, 2011 in Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Class Actions Alleging Inflated Employment Data Filed Against Two Law Schools

Over at TaxProf Blog, Paul Caron (Cincinnati) reports on two class action lawsuits that were filed today against New York Law School and Thomas M. Cooley Law School. Here are links to the complaints in Gomez-Jiminez v. New York Law School and MacDonald v. Thomas M. Cooley Law School.

If you’re wondering about subject-matter jurisdiction and the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA), you’re not alone. The Cooley class action was filed in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan and invokes CAFA diversity jurisdiction [28 U.S.C. § 1332(d)(2)]. The NYLS class action was filed in New York state court (in Manhattan), and the first paragraph of the complaint preemptively addresses the possibility of CAFA removal with an allegation that seems geared toward CAFA’s local-controversy and/or home-state exceptions [See 28 U.S.C. § 1332(d)(4)]. The complaint states: “Upon information and belief, more than two-thirds of all members of the putative class, at all material times relevant to the allegations of this Complaint, were residents of the State of New York and are current or former students of Defendant New York Law School.”

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August 10, 2011 in Class Actions, In the News, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)