Friday, November 15, 2013

SCOTUS Cert. Grant of Interest: Halliburton v. Erica P. John Fund

Today the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund (No. 13-317). Here are the questions presented:

1. Whether this Court should overrule or substantially modify the holding of Basic Inc. v. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988), to the extent that it recognizes a presumption of classwide reliance derived from the fraud-on-the-market theory.

2. Whether, in a case where the plaintiff invokes the presumption of reliance to seek class certification, the defendant may rebut the presumption and prevent class certification by introducing evidence that the alleged misrepresentations did not distort the market price of its stock.

Links to the cert-stage briefing and the Fifth Circuit’s opinion below available are at SCOTUSblog. If the name of this case sounds familiar, it’s been up to the Supreme Court before. In 2011, the Court unanimously decided that the plaintiff was not required to prove loss causation at the class-certification phase. But at the end of the opinion, Chief Justice Roberts alluded to the issues the Court will now confront:

Because we conclude the Court of Appeals erred by requiring EPJ Fund to prove loss causation at the certification stage, we need not, and do not, address any other question about Basic, its presumption, or how and when it may be rebutted. To the extent Halliburton has preserved any further arguments against class certification, they may be addressed in the first instance by the Court of Appeals on remand.

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/civpro/2013/11/scotus-cert-grant-of-interest-halliburton-v-erica-p-john-fund.html

Class Actions, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Recent Decisions, Supreme Court Cases | Permalink

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