Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Risch on Injunctions in Patent Law

Over at PrawfsBlawg, Michael Risch has a posting about "Civil Procedure in Patent Clothing."  The post concerns the retrial of issues in a patent contempt proceeding in the case of Tivo v. Echostar.  From the posting:

I think the best way to read the case is that the retrial of infringement only happens where the court finds colorable differences. In other words, where the redesign is targeted at the specific claim elements that were disputed and proven at trial. If the changes are only small, then the judge can verify that there is still infringement (or not). But where the changes are big and targeted at disputed claim elements, then allegations of continued infringement by other product features must be retried. This interpretation helps reconcile the seemingly contradictory quotes above, and also makes sense in practice.

There are longer term consequences from this rule. First, it might give an incentive to overlitigate, because patentees will now want to prove as many alternate forms of infringement as possible. Of course, maybe they do that anyway. Second, it puts pressure on the rule that winning parties cannot appeal arguments they lost. After all, it is much cheaper to file a contempt claim than to retry infringement in case of a design around, and then appeal the court's errors.

RJE

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/civpro/2011/04/risch-on-injunctions-in-patent-law.html

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