Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Reading the Kagan Tea Leaves on Twombly/Iqbal

We blogged earlier about Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan’s civil procedure paper trail.

As for her views on one of today’s most controversial issues in civil procedure — federal pleading standards — a recent New York Times article starts with an interesting story about Kagan’s service in the Clinton administration. Kagan’s first Oval Office presentation involved the 1995 Private Securities Litigation Reform Act (PSLRA), and Kagan expressed particular concern about the Act’s heightened pleading standards. From the article, Bill Clinton Speaks Out on Kagan:

“Against the wishes of his economic team and top Congressional Democrats, Mr. Clinton in late 1995 was considering vetoing new legislation that was framed as a way to halt frivolous lawsuits against the securities industry. At his direction, Ms. Kagan had analyzed the bill and determined that it would raise the bar so high for such suits that shareholders could be prevented from pursuing legitimate fraud claims. . . . Mr. Clinton accepted her judgment and issued a surprise veto — one of two occasions when he was overridden by Congress.”

Perhaps a Justice Kagan will be similarly concerned about the direction of federal pleading standards after Twombly and Iqbal?

--A

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/civpro/2010/06/reading-the-kagan-tea-leaves-on-twomblyiqbal.html

Current Affairs, In the News, Supreme Court Cases, Twombly/Iqbal | Permalink

Comments

I recall reading a study in a law review article recently that did a fairly good job at detailing that Twombly and Iqbal basically had no effect on pleading standards across circuits. Can't locate that article now...of course.

Posted by: Laszlo Szabo | Jun 22, 2010 6:23:26 AM

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