Chinese Law Prof Blog

Editor: Donald C. Clarke
George Washington University Law School

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

CECC hearings on China's commitments in financial services

I have received the following announcement:

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China will hold a full Commission hearing entitled "China's WTO Financial Services Commitments: A Commercial Rule of Law Assessment," on Wednesday, July 26 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in Room 124 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. Senator Hagel will preside.

All CECC hearings are open to the public and the press. Members of the public who wish to attend do not need to respond to this message or otherwise register. News media representatives should see the final paragraph of this announcement.

The witnesses are:

Panel 1

Timothy P. Stratford, Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for China Affairs, Office of the United States Trade Representative

Mark Sobel, Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Monetary and Financial Policy, U.S. Department of the Treasury

Panel 2

John Frisbie, President, The US-China Business Council

Pieter Bottelier, Visiting Associate Professor, School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University

Nicholas C. Howson, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School

*****************************

For news media representatives: If you have no special equipment needs, you do not need to register in advance. If you need special equipment or services (e.g., malt box, audio feed), please contact Emma Ashburn at (202) 226-3831 not later than close of business on Friday, July 21.

July 19, 2006 in Conferences, News - Miscellaneous, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, July 2, 2006

Chinese Law Prof Blog postings in July

Dear readers:

I regret that postings will continue to be sporadic during July, as I will on vacation and otherwise away from my usual work routine for much of that time. Regular postings will resume around the middle of August.

Best wishes to all,

Don Clarke

July 2, 2006 in Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 17, 2006

USTR seeks comments on Chinese IPR protection

The Office of the USTR is conducting what it calls a "special provincial review" (SPR) of IPR protection in China, and solicits public comments concerning the locations and issues that should be the focus of the SPR. The deadline is July 14th; there will also apparently be an opportunity to submit more detailed comments later.

The full announcement is here: Download USTR.pdf

June 17, 2006 in News - Miscellaneous, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, May 7, 2006

Slow month at Chinese Law Prof Blog

Dear readers,

May and the first half of June are going to be a very busy time for me, so I do not expect to be able to post as frequently as before. I hope to return to daily postings in the last half of June.

Best wishes,

Don Clarke

May 7, 2006 in News - Miscellaneous, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, April 16, 2006

English-language LLM programs in China

Peking University's Law School has just started an English-language LL.M. program in Chinese law. Applications for the 2006-07 academic year are due on May 29th. For more information, click here.

To the best of my knowledge, this is the second English-language LL.M. in Chinese law offered directly by a Chinese law school. The first is at Tsinghua University's Faculty of Law; for more information, click here.

April 16, 2006 in Fellowships/Research Opportunities, News - Miscellaneous, Other, People and Institutions | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 25, 2006

Chinese Law Prof Blog user statistics

Readers might be interested to know where fellow readers come from. Here's a graphical breakdown by country of all visitors to this site since May 30, 2005:

Blogpic

March 25, 2006 in Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 13, 2006

Reader survey

I have been asked by Professor Caron, the publisher and editor-in-chief of the Law Professor Blogs Network (the group of which this blog is a member), to post the following message:

Please take a moment to fill out our short reader survey here.  We would like to have a better idea about who is reading this blog so we can better serve you.  Thanks in advance for your help.  (The survey will remain at the top of the middle column throughout this week.)

March 13, 2006 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, December 13, 2005

Temporary suspension of postings to Chinese Law Prof Blog - correction

A reader has helpfully shown me how to overcome the problems I was having in posting. Thus, there is no need to suspend postings completely. But for other reasons I will have to be posting less frequently over the next couple of weeks.

December 13, 2005 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 12, 2005

Temporary suspension of postings to Chinese Law Prof Blog

I will have to suspend posting to this blog until around Dec. 23. I am currently in China, where all Typepad addresses are blocked. How did I post this then, you may ask. It's possible to get to Typepad through a proxy server, but for some reason accessing it this way makes it impossible for me to format posts in any way (including even hard returns), embed URLs, upload documents, or indeed do anything other than post very simple text such as this. I am going to post one more item regarding job openings at the USTR, because it's time-sensitive. Please forgive the lousy formatting. Happy Holidays to all.

December 12, 2005 in Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 10, 2005

The artistic side of tax in China

I was recently rooting around in my hard disk for something and came across this item - a motivational song for tax collectors - which I translated many years ago. I hope readers enjoy it.

TaxlogoThe Motherland Is in My Heart
(From Zhongguo Shuiwu (Chinese Taxation), No. 3, 1990)

Words: Chen Jingxin
Music: Wang Shuangyin

Proudly and with deep feeling

The national emblem is on my cap
And the motherland is in my heart.
We are glorious tax workers.

A historic mission is on our shoulders:
To collect wealth for the Four Modernizations of the State,
To promote the flourishing of the economy.
We do not fear difficulties or dangers,
We go throughout all the towns and villages;
We do not fear difficulties or dangers,
We go throughout all the towns and villages.

The national emblem is on my cap
And the motherland is in my heart.
We are glorious tax workers.

A sacred responsibility is on our shoulders:
To struggle for the administration of taxes according to law,
To stand at our post in order to see that policies are strictly followed.
We have a thousand stratagems
For stopping tax evasion;
We have a thousand stratagems
For stopping tax evasion.

The national emblem is on my cap
And the motherland is in my heart.
We are glorious tax workers.

An exalted faith is in our hearts:
To devote ourselves to socialism,
To strive for the cause of tax collection.
We are willing servants of the people
And vigorously promote honest practices;
We are willing servants of the people
And vigorously promote honest practices.

October 10, 2005 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (1)

Tuesday, August 9, 2005

Vacation announcement

I am currently on vacation and won't be posting regularly to this blog until between August 14th and August 17th.

August 9, 2005 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, July 18, 2005

Aliases for Chinese Law Prof Blog

For those of you with bad memories, you may now access this blog through any of three easily-remembered aliases:

These are just forwarding URLs; your browser will get pointed to this site. Incidentally, I find that forwarding URLs often don't work from China, even when they point to sites that are directly accessible. Go figure.

July 18, 2005 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 20, 2005

How to Display and Edit Chinese in English Windows Systems

It occurred to me that since I occasionally post Chinese text here, readers might appreciate a guide to displaying and editing Chinese text in English Windows systems. Most readers who read Chinese will already know how to do this, but there are a few advanced wrinkles that may have escaped their attention, particularly when working with something other than Internet Explorer.

I looked at a number of web sites and found one that is fairly comprehensive: http://lingua.mtsu.edu/chinese-computing/faq/pc.html

For those who don't want to read all that, mostly it's a question of going to the View (or equivalent) menu on your browser, selecting Encoding (or equivalent), and then selecting Chinese Simplified (GB), since that is usually the font I'll be using. Another option to try is Chinese Traditional (Big5).

June 20, 2005 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 30, 2005

The Chinalaw listserv

Chinalaw is a listserv I maintain that is dedicated to the discussion of issues of Chinese law -- primarily the law of the People's Republic of China, but from time to time there is discussion of other related subjects such as Chinese legal history or the law of Taiwan or Hong Kong.

It is an unmoderated discussion list, meaning that members are asked to observe self-discipline and keep on topic.

To subscribe, please go to http://hermes.gwu.edu/archives/chinalaw.html and follow the instructions there. Special note to those in the PRC: you will probably be unable to access this site, since the George Washington University website is blocked (don't ask me why) by the Chinese authorities. Please email me with your name and email address if you wish to subscribe. Unless you cannot access the above website, please do not ask me to subscribe you.

I maintain a website for the listserv; the alias for the URL is http://chinalawlist.org. At present this alias just points you to the above website, but shortly I will have a different website up.

May 30, 2005 in Other, People and Institutions | Permalink | TrackBack (0)