Chinese Law Prof Blog

Editor: Donald C. Clarke
George Washington University Law School

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Monday, April 2, 2012

Internship for law students at Taipei law firm

I have received the following announcement:

Taipei law firm Winkler Partners is looking for an intern for the summer of 2012 (c. June to August).

You will need to be currently enrolled in law school for us to get work authorization.

The basic qualifications include good analytic, research, and writing skills. We will try to pair you with an intern from a Taiwanese law school.

You do not need to know any Chinese for this position although it would be helpful.

Your duties would include curating social media sites, writing updates on legal topics, and light case work for 15-20 hours per week. The pay is US$8 per hour (the same as what the Taiwanese intern will receive) and you will have to cover your own travel to and living expenses in Taipei (very roughly, about US$700 per month on a tight student budget).

This position would be ideal for a current law student who would also like to study Chinese over the summer since we are located conveniently close to both National Taiwan University (ICLP) and National Taiwan Normal University (Shida Mandarin Training Center).

Please send a resume and a brief writing sample to the attention of Gladys Kao (gkao@winklerpartners.com) if you are interested.


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Comments

Sounds like a good opportunity to get some experience on your resume too. The 15-20 hours of light case work is really the reward for undertaking this position and I think this is ideal from someone fresh out of law school after studying their gdl courses or similar discipline.

My friend did a similar job a while ago (it was in Malaysia, not Taiwan) and he said it was ideal for seeing more of the world, meeting new people and really finding his wings after leaving law school. Obviously it's not intended that this would be a long-term career for anyone, but in this economic climate, I think everything helps to set your resume apart from the hundreds of other applications that many job vacancies attract.

Posted by: Emma Tameside | Aug 3, 2012 3:34:46 AM

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