Chinese Law Prof Blog

Editor: Donald C. Clarke
George Washington University Law School

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Friday, August 7, 2009

More on the Xu Zhiyong case, with documents

Here's some more information on Xu Zhiyong's detention:

First, a profile of Xu by journalist Susan Jakes.

Second, here's a Twitter feed set up by Gongmeng (Xu's organization) where you can follow developments in the case.

Rebecca MacKinnon has kindly permitted me to reprint the following instructions for accessing Twitter in China:

Twitter is blocked in China. However lots of people in China are still using it via various methods. In addition to using a VPN, proxy server or other circumvention means to access blocked sites, you can access Twitter via sites like iTweet  (http://www.itweet.net/web) or Journotwit (http://www.journotwit.com/) or you can use one of many "twitter clients" to access twitter without using your web browser. They include:
Tweetdeck (http://tweetdeck.com/), Twhirl (http://www.twhirl.org/) and Twitterific (http://iconfactory.com/software/twitterrific/)


Third, here is a copy of the original sanctioning decision from the State Tax Administration: Page 1 | Page 2.

August 7, 2009 in Commentary, News - Chinese Law, People and Institutions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 3, 2009

"The most heinous of crimes"?

Article 48 of China's Criminal Law states that the death penalty is to be against only those criminals who commit the most heinous of crimes (死刑只适用于罪行极其严重的犯罪分子). Apparently drunken drivers who commit negligent homicide now rank up there with professional hitmen and serial killers who torture their victims - at least according to the Intermediate Court of Chengdu, Sichuan, as reported here. An aggravating circumstance is that the driver was unlicensed. He did apparently stick around at the scene, however (as reported here). He was convicted of endangering public safety.

Obviously, negligent homicide through drunken driving by a guy who didn't even have a license is not a good thing. But if that's "the most heinous of crimes," it's setting the bar pretty low.

August 3, 2009 in Commentary, News - Chinese Law | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)