Chinese Law Prof Blog

Editor: Donald C. Clarke
George Washington University Law School

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Friday, October 14, 2005

Latest issue of GTZ newsletter now available

Issue 3, 2005 of the newsletter of the GTZ Advisory Service to the Legal Reform in China is now available on line here. And students, don't forget that GTZ is always looking for interns - details at the end of the newsletter.

October 14, 2005 in Internships/Employment Opportunities, Publications | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, October 12, 2005

CECC releases 2005 Annual Report

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China has just released its 2005 Annual Report. The CECC notes both forward and retrograde steps in human rights protection in China, and concludes that there has been no overall improvement in the past year.

A listserv of which I am a member has recently seen a lively discussion of the merits of US government bodies such as the CECC telling China what it must or should do with respect to human rights and other issues. Whatever one's views of the legitimacy of the CECC's project, however, the Commission has earned a good reputation for the capability of its staff and the quality of their reporting.

October 12, 2005 in Publications | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 11, 2005

More problems with Coudert's China operations

Coudert's China practice seems to have gone largely to Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe and DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary. But according to a recent news report:

[S]ome sticking points remain. Three dozen lawyers and staffers in the Beijing office -at least some of whom are going to DLA - now assert that Coudert hasn't complied with severance obligations under Chinese law. An employee there, speaking on condition of anonymity, said a complaint has been filed with the Beijing Justice Bureau and the Chinese Ministry of Labor.

A legal opinion prepared for the employees, a translation of which was obtained by the Recorder, also includes an allegation that Orrick is attempting to transfer to itself Coudert's license to practice in China, which the opinion says would violate Chinese law.

I figure this much is fair use. For the full report, go here.

October 11, 2005 in News - Miscellaneous | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 10, 2005

The artistic side of tax in China

I was recently rooting around in my hard disk for something and came across this item - a motivational song for tax collectors - which I translated many years ago. I hope readers enjoy it.

TaxlogoThe Motherland Is in My Heart
(From Zhongguo Shuiwu (Chinese Taxation), No. 3, 1990)

Words: Chen Jingxin
Music: Wang Shuangyin

Proudly and with deep feeling

The national emblem is on my cap
And the motherland is in my heart.
We are glorious tax workers.

A historic mission is on our shoulders:
To collect wealth for the Four Modernizations of the State,
To promote the flourishing of the economy.
We do not fear difficulties or dangers,
We go throughout all the towns and villages;
We do not fear difficulties or dangers,
We go throughout all the towns and villages.

The national emblem is on my cap
And the motherland is in my heart.
We are glorious tax workers.

A sacred responsibility is on our shoulders:
To struggle for the administration of taxes according to law,
To stand at our post in order to see that policies are strictly followed.
We have a thousand stratagems
For stopping tax evasion;
We have a thousand stratagems
For stopping tax evasion.

The national emblem is on my cap
And the motherland is in my heart.
We are glorious tax workers.

An exalted faith is in our hearts:
To devote ourselves to socialism,
To strive for the cause of tax collection.
We are willing servants of the people
And vigorously promote honest practices;
We are willing servants of the people
And vigorously promote honest practices.

October 10, 2005 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (1)

Sunday, October 9, 2005

More independence for courts: a straw in the wind?

An interesting article recently appeared on the People's Daily website stating that the dependence of local procuratorates upon local government for finances would be "thoroughly reformed" within three years: the goal is to have all financing come from the central or the provincial governments. This is one of a series of reforms announced in the Opinion on the Three-Year Implementation of Further Reforms in the Procuratorate (关于进一步深化检察改革的三年实施意见) issued by the Supreme People's Procuratorate month.

Many Chinese and foreign analysts of the Chinese legal system have long called for similar reforms to the system of court financing as a way of enhancing the independence of courts from local political powerholders. As the procuratorate is administratively analogous to the court system, what can be done in the former can be done in the latter. The significance of this reform for courts will not likely be lost on those who would change the system.

October 9, 2005 in News - Chinese Law | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)