Thursday, October 1, 2015

The Midwest Academy of Legal Studies in Business (MALSB) Annual Conference - Chicago, IL - April 2016

Currently, I am planning to attend the MALSB Annual Conference in Chicago this coming April. The conference is described by the organizers below. While ALSB regional meetings like this one are usually attended mostly by legal studies professors in business schools, I am told that the conference is open to all.


The Midwest Academy of Legal Studies in Business (MALSB) Annual Conference is held in conjunction with the MBAA International Conference, long billed as “The Best Conference Value in America.”

The MBAA International Conference draws hundreds of academics and practitioners from business-related fields such as accounting, business/society/government, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, health administration, information systems, international business, management, and marketing. Although the MALSB will have its own program track on legal studies, attendees will be able to take advantage of the multidisciplinary nature of this international conference and attend sessions held by the other program tracks.

 [More details are available under the break.]

Continue reading

October 1, 2015 in Business School, Conferences, Haskell Murray, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Albany Law School - Associate Dean and Professor Postions

University of Kentucky College of Law - Commercial and Business Law Professor Position


The University of Kentucky College of Law recently posted an announcement of their professor opening in the commercial and business law areas

My updated list of law schools hiring in the business law area is here.

My updated list of non-law schools (mostly business schools) hiring law professors is here.

September 30, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Ten Promises For New (and Old) Law Professors to Consider

A couple weeks ago, I wrote Ten Promises For New Law Students to Consider, which discussed the promises I made to myself when I went to law school.  It seems to me appropriate that I should follow up with something applies to me now.

This list for law professors (or at least, this law professor) includes some of the promises I made myself when I left practice, and some that have evolved over the almost decade I have been teaching.  It's hard to believe this is my tenth year as a full-time teacher. 

To that end, here are my suggestions for faculty members, based on my experience. I don't always keep these promises, but (as I did with the law school promises) I try.  This list is even less exhaustive than my last effort, and I welcome additions to the list in comments. I am not going to lie, this was a harder list to make, and it's a challenge to fulfill them all (especially #6). 

I promise: 


(1) To be intentional.  That is, I will choose books, assign readings and exercises, and draft paper assignments and exams with a purpose.  They may not always be the best choice, but there will be a reason (supported by good intent) they were chosen. 


(2) To remember, whether it's related to demeanor, effort, or analysis, that I cannot be the benchmark for all my students.  They are not me, and I am not them.  We all have a story, and it is (in some way) unique. 


(3) To remember that, while kindness, sympathy, and empathy are essential skills to being a good teacher, colleague, and human being, they are not inconsistent with high expectations.


(4) To keep connected to practice and to people with non-academic jobs so that I can keep current and  grounded in the practical realities of life as an attorney and member of a broader community. 


(5)  To take pride (and risks) in my work in an effort to be better at what I do and to evolve in all aspects of my work -- teaching, research, and service.  (Old dogs can learn new tricks.)


(6) To recognize boundaries and to be kind and patient with my family because who I am at home impacts who I am at work (and vice versa).


(7) To do my best to get enough sleep and enough exercise. 


(8) To find the fun in my work when I can, and not forget that one of the best parts of being an academic is writing about things I choose (not that my clients choose) and taking positions I think are right.


(9) To be friendly and helpful to build relationships so that the community I know is a community I want. This includes my faculty colleagues, our staff and support colleagues, and our student colleagues.  


(10) To understand that I cannot be everything to everyone and that opportunity costs are real.  Thus, as I seek to fulfill John Wooden's ideal -- "Don't measure yourself by what you have accomplished, but by what you should have accomplished with your ability."-- I will keep in mind that accomplishments are more than articles written and classes taught. They include those, but they also include things like laughs, hugs, bike rides, soccer games, swing sets, sunsets, beaches, and good food. Beer, wine, and cocktails, are sometimes a nice touch, too. 

September 1, 2015 in Joshua P. Fershee, Law School, Research/Scholarhip, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (2)

Thursday, August 27, 2015

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Hiring in Business and Tax Law

As mentioned in my post about law schools hiring in business law areas, we received the following posting from The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law.


University of Utah Hiring in Business and Tax Law

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of associate professor beginning academic year 2016-2017. Qualifications for the position include a record of excellence in academics, successful teaching experience or potential as a teacher, and strong scholarly distinction or promise. The College is particularly interested in candidates in the areas of business and tax law. Interested persons can submit an application to the University of Utah Human Resources website at (please note that the application requires a cover letter, CV, and list of references). Baiba Hicks, Administrative Assistant to the Faculty Appointments Committee ( or 801-581-5464) is available to answer questions.

The University of Utah is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and educator and its policies prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, religion, age, status as a person with a disability, or veteran’s status. Minorities, women, veterans, and those with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified veterans. To inquire further about the University’s nondiscrimination and affirmative action policies or to request a reasonable accommodation for a disability in the application process, please contact the following individual who has been designated as the University’s Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 South Presidents Circle, Rm. 135, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, (801)581-8365, email:

August 27, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 24, 2015

Thoughts on Beginning My 30th Year of Law Teaching

I begin my 30th year of law teaching today. I can still remember that hot August day I first stepped into the huge, tiered classroom at SMU. Standing on the raised platform facing a mob of over a hundred eager students. The low hum generated by dozens of pre-class conversations. The feeling of inferiority as all those pairs of eyes checked out the newest professor.

I was scared to death. I had spent the summer reviewing the law of business associations—reading and highlighting the casebook; reading a corporate law treatise; reading law review articles. I had extensive teaching notes in front of me that first day, some of them cribbed from class notes that the late Alan Bromberg had generously shared with me. But I didn’t have a clue how to teach. For the most part, I was mimicking what my own law school professors had done, without realizing why they had done what they did.

It didn’t go well at first. I was shy and hesitant, and students could sense my lack of confidence. Many of the students weren’t as prepared as I’d hoped, and I wasn’t sure how to draw them out and build on what they understood. Some of the students weren’t that eager to learn the law of business associations, and I didn’t have a clue how to motivate them. My first-semester evaluations were horrible.

Things have changed significantly since I began teaching. I’ve changed. I’m no longer afraid as I walk into the classroom; decades of teaching have turned my fear into just a slight tinge of anxiety. The evaluations aren’t as bad; I’ve learned how to teach, and I succeed more often than not. I have even won teaching awards.

The classroom has also changed. When I started teaching, I wasn’t competing with Facebook, online shopping, and email. I don’t think anyone in my first class had a laptop. When I started teaching, PowerPoint wasn’t an option. SMU didn’t even have whiteboards; I had to regularly brush chalk off my clothes. When I started teaching, professors distributed syllabi and supplemental reading via photocopy and e-books weren’t available. Today, I distribute all supplemental material over the Internet and one of my courses is wholly online.

Some things haven’t changed that much. Some of the students are still underprepared. Some of them still aren’t that interested in business associations, taking the class only because they know it will be on the bar. And it’s still a chore to end that hum of pre-class conversations when it’s time to start.

But it’s been a great career. I enjoy what I’m doing, except when administrative hassles interfere with my teaching and research—something that, unfortunately, seems to happen more often with seniority.

If you’re new to law teaching, persevere through the challenges. Learn as your students learn and try to have fun. Law teaching is an awesome responsibility, but, in spite of the struggles, it can be an incredibly rewarding experience. I hope you too can look back after thirty years with a feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment.

If you're a student, give those new teachers a break. They're learning, just like you. Take out your frustrations on the old fogies like me.

August 24, 2015 in C. Steven Bradford, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (6)

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert on Corporations

Apparently the corporate tax inversion crackdown by the Obama administration is not working. The Financial Times reported this week that three companies have announced plans to redomicile in Europe in just one week. I’m not sure that I will have time to discuss inversions in any detail in my Business Associations class, but I have talked about it in civil procedure, when we discuss personal jurisdiction.

From my recent survey monkey results of my incoming students, I know that some of my students received their business news from the Daily Show. In the past I have used Jon Stewart, John Oliver, and Stephen Colbert to illustrate certain concepts to my millennial students. Here are some humorous takes on the inversion issue that I may use this year in class. Warning- there is some profanity and obviously they are pretty one-sided. But I have found that humor is a great way to start a debate on some of these issues that would otherwise seem dry to students. 

1)   Steve Colbert on corporate inversions-1- note the discussion on fiduciary duties

2)    Steve Colbert on corporate inversions interviews Allan Sloan

3)   Jon Stewart- inversion of the money snatchers and on corporate personhood toward the end.

For those of you who are political junkies like me, I thought I would share a video that I showed when I taught a seminar on corporate governance, compliance, and social responsibility. This video focuses on political campaigns, and for a number of reasons, this campaign season seems to be in full gear already. Indeed, Professor Larry Lessig from Harvard is mulling a run for president in part to highlight the need for reform in campaign financing. Below is Stephen Colbert’s take on SuperPACs and political financing.

1) Colbert's shell corporation- note the discussion of the incorporation in Delaware and the meeting of the board of directors

Enjoy, and best of luck for those starting classes next week.

August 13, 2015 in Business Associations, Compliance, Corporate Governance, Corporate Personality, Corporations, Current Affairs, International Business, Law School, Marcia Narine, Teaching, Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Ten Promises For New Law Students to Consider

It is orientation time for West Virginia University College of Law, and I am sure other law schools around the country. If not, it's coming soon. I always like the buzz of the new students returning to the building, though it is a little bittersweet as the time I had for other projects is clearing nearing the end. All in all, though, I miss the students and the activity, so I'm happy the new year is getting ready to start. 

The combination of excitement and trepidation (if not fear) seems to be what stands our to me the most. It makes sense. Law school is a big undertaking, and it's not easy.  And it can be hard because it can be challenging both academically and socially.  As my wife has noted, "Law school can be more like high school than high school."  (I had a distinct advantage in skipping a lot of that because we were married when we started law school.)

To that end, here are my suggestions, based on the promises I made to myself when I left my job and went back to law school. Give it a try (and I welcome additions to the list in comments.)

I promise: 

(1) To read everything assigned.  Really. Not like undergrad, but actually read it all.  Then read it again. And again if I need to.

(2) To be honest with myself about whether I really understand what I' m reading so I know if I should read it again. 

(3) To view Black's Law Dictionary as my friend and use it liberally, rather than guessing at words from context.  

(4) To remember I don't know Latin very well (and see number 3 above). 

(5) To go to every class -- every class -- that I am able to attend and participate in that class so that I can learn what I know or don't know, not to so show what I know (or think I know). 

(6) To recognize that no one class is more important (or easier or harder) than another.  I will not skip Torts or Contracts to work on my Legal Writing memo.  It all needs to happen. 

(7) To do my best to get enough sleep. 

(8) To remember that everyone has a story and not assume I know it. 

(9) To be friendly and build relationships so that the community I know is a community I want. 

(10) To do my best work and know that my real competition is myself, so that when I finish an exam or paper, even though I don't know how well I did, I will know I did everything I could to do well. As John Wooden said, "Don't measure yourself by what you have accomplished, but by what you should have accomplished with your ability."

August 11, 2015 in Joshua P. Fershee, Law School | Permalink | Comments (4)

University of Iowa Hiring Faculty

The law school in the state next door to mine is hiring faculty. Their football team isn't as good as ours, but it's a pretty good law school in spite of that deficiency. Here's the listing:

THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW anticipates hiring several tenured/tenure track faculty members and clinical faculty members (including a director for field placement program) over the coming year. Our goal is to find outstanding scholars and teachers who can extend the law school’s traditional strengths and intellectual breadth. We are interested in all persons of high academic achievement and promise with outstanding credentials. Appointment and rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. Candidates should send resumes, references, and descriptions of areas of interest to:  Faculty Appointments Committee, College of Law, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa  52242-1113.

THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply and will receive consideration for employment free from discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, age, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, religion, associational preference, status as a qualified individual with a disability, or status as a protected veteran.

August 11, 2015 in Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2015

Kosuri on the Art of Business Lawyering (and How to Teach It)

As I continue my (futile?) quest to exhaust my electronic reading pile before the fall semester begins, I recently read a nice article on business lawyering: Praveen Kosuri, Beyond Gilson: The Art of Business Lawyering, 19 LEWIS & CLARK L. REV. 463 (2013), also available on SSRN here.

Kosuri asks what distinguishes great business lawyers, and develops a three-tiered pyramid of the skills that transactional business lawyers need. At the bottom of the pyramid are what Kosuri calls foundational skills: reading and understanding contracts; research and drafting; financial literacy; and a basic knowledge of business law. The next level of the pyramid, which Kosuri calls transitional skills, includes negotiation; structuring deals; risk management; and transaction cost engineering. The top level of the pyramid, which Kosuri calls optimal skills, includes understanding business; understanding people; problem-solving; and advising.

Kosuri then considers who would be best at teaching each of those categories of skills and how to teach them. I don’t agree with everything he says, but the article is insightful and certainly worth reading.

Here’s the abstract:

Thirty years ago, Ronald Gilson asked the question, “what do business lawyers really do?” Since that time legal scholars have continued to grapple with that question and the implicit question of how business lawyers add value to their clients. This article revisits the question again but with a more expansive perspective on the role of business lawyer and what constitutes value to clients.

Gilson put forth the theory of business lawyers as transaction cost engineers. Years later, Karl Okamoto introduced the concept of deal lawyer as reputational intermediary. Steven Schwarcz attempted to isolate the role of business lawyer from other advisors and concluded the only value lawyers added was as regulatory cost managers. All of these conceptions of business lawyering focused too narrowly on the technical skills employed, and none captured the skill set or essence of the truly great business lawyer. In this article, I put forth a more fully developed conception of business lawyer that highlights skills that differentiate great business lawyers from the merely average. I then discuss whether these skills can be taught in law schools and how a tiered curriculum might be designed to better educate future business lawyers.

August 10, 2015 in C. Steven Bradford, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, August 7, 2015

The University of South Carolina School of Law - Professor Positions

From an e-mail I received earlier today:


University of South Carolina School of Law

Hiring Advertisement

The University of South Carolina School of Law invites applications for tenured, tenure-track, or visiting faculty positions to begin fall semester 2016. Candidates should have a juris doctorate or equivalent degree. Additionally, a successful applicant should have a record of excellence in academia or in practice, the potential to be an outstanding teacher, and demonstrable scholarly promise.  Although the School of Law is especially interested in candidates who are qualified to teach in the areas of taxation, clinical legal education, environmental law and small business, we are equally interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity of our law school community whose teaching interests may fall outside of these areas. 

Interested persons should send a resume, references, and subject area preferences to Prof. Eboni Nelson, Chair, Faculty Selection Committee, c/o Kim Fanning, University of South Carolina School of Law, 701 S. Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 or, by email, to HIRE2016@LAW.SC.EDU (electronic The University of South Carolina is committed to a diverse faculty, staff, and student body.  We encourage applications from women, minorities, persons with disabilities, and others whose background, experience, and viewpoints contribute to the diversity of our institution. The University of South Carolina is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the base of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, sexual orientation, gender, or veteran status.

August 7, 2015 in Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Law Schools Hiring in Business Areas 2015-16

Earlier I posted a list of business schools hiring in legal studies.

This post includes a list of law schools that have listed business law as an area of interest.* I will use the PrawfsBlawg spreadsheet and other sources to update this list from time to time.

Feel free to send me any additions or leave additions in the comments.   

Updated Sept. 30, 2015

*Schools that have not listed any preferences, or that have provided open-ended language after preferences that do not include business law, are not included in this list. Also, given that I do not have access to the AALS ads, this list is likely incomplete and only includes schools that have posted their open positions online.  

For the purposes of this post, I include the following subject areas in the definition of "business law": banking; business associations; corporate finance; corporate governance; financial institutions; international business transactions; law & economics; law & entrepreneurship; M&A; securities regulation; unincorporated entities .

August 7, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

The University of Maryland School of Law - Professor Opening

I received this position posting today via e-mail (emphasis added):


The University of Maryland School of Law invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position to teach in the area of business law, potentially including an appropriate combination of the following courses: Business Associations, Corporate Finance, Secured Transactions, along with other core classes in the business curriculum.  We will consider both entry level and lateral candidates.  The University of Maryland has a strong commitment to diversity.  We welcome applications from persons of color, women, and other members of historically disadvantaged groups.  Contact: Professor Leigh Goodmark, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, 500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.  Email:  Phone: (410) 706-3549.

The University of Maryland, Baltimore is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

August 5, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Responses to Students Who Ask About the Use of Outdated Course Materials

I am sure that many of you, like me, are deluged with email messages at this point in the year from well-meaning students taking your fall courses who ask whether a particular text--or version of a text--marked as "required" on the book list is really required. There are many ways to respond to these requests.  A number of my my Facebook friends--including former students--suggest a simple response, something akin to: "What part of required do you not understand?"

While that kind of a response sometimes is very appealing (especially when I get two emails asking about this kind of thing on the same day), I have decided to use these interactions as a teaching moment--of sorts. Set forth below is a version of a message that I send, in case it is of some use to you in this or another similar context. The specific inquiry to which I am responding relates to a student's question about using a 2013 "statutory supplement" in my Fall 2015 Business Associations course.

Hey, [name of student]. Thanks for reaching out to me. This is a common question. It has an easy (although perhaps unpalatable) answer. I marked the 2015 statutory resource book (not really a supplement, but the core of our work in this course) as required for the course. I will be working from the 2015 version in and outside class. I cannot ensure that the 2013 version—or even the 2014 version—will have everything you need. While I know the authors, I do not control and am not privy to what they include and exclude every year. So, I cannot recommend your use of the 2013 version, and if you use it, you will be responsible for noting where the gaps or changes are. There may be none, but I cannot guarantee that.

I regret making students pay the money for a new paperback every year. But I have come to consider it an investment. Of course, as you already know, lawyers should never use an outdated version of the law for their research. It can be the basis of a claim of malpractice or sanctions on the basis of incompetence or a lack of diligence. So, my required use of a current version of the restatement provisions, statutes, rules, and other materials in the statutory resource book is also a way of encouraging professionally responsible, low-risk legal practice.

I will not be policing the use of outdated or other supplements—or even online versions of the statutes, rules, and other materials (which include a sample corporate charter and bylaws, for example)--instead of the assigned statutory resource book for class. So, it's all up to you. Others have used outdated or online or photocopied versions of the materials in the statutory resource book in the past and done very well in the course. But they typically put in significant work on their own to ensure they had what they needed for the exams and assignments.

See you in a few weeks. I will look forward to having you in class. You already have exhibited professionally responsible behavior in contacting me in advance and asking about the resource book. That's a great start to the semester.

Joan Heminway

Incidentally, in case you wondered, most students respond to my email thanking me and noting they will acquire the 2015 edition.  Many students do not contact me at all about this issue and just go ahead and use outdated materials.  Some of these non-communicative students have later admitted to me they regretted that decision.

Also, I have tried in the past to just assign online versions of the restatement provisions, statutes, and rules.  There are two main disadvantages that I identified to this approach.  First, I found that students did not bring the necessary legal provisions to class with them in electronic or hard-copy form or did not bring a computer to access rules that come up in class in an unplanned manner.  Relatedly, it is important to note that, when the students take my open-book midterm (oral) and final (written) exams, they really need to have hard copies of the relevant rules with them, which means printing them out and collecting them in a book or folder anyway (since I do not allow electronic devices, other than ExamSoft-modified computers, in my examinations). Second, my statutory resource book has materials other than restatement, statutory, and regulatory provisions in it.  If the book is not required, I must supplement the text with these additional materials, where necessary or desired.  

Let me know your thoughts and share comments for improvement.  Or tell me I am being too nice and should push back harder at my students.  The type of response I have included above is generally consistent with my overall communication style with my students, which could be characterized as compassionate but direct.  Others may have very different approaches to instructor-student communications or course objectives that make my response undesirable or even counterproductive.  Please do share those kinds of reactions in the comments.

August 5, 2015 in Books, Business Associations, Joan Heminway, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Rutgers University School of Law (Camden) - Job Posting

The following position posting was provided to us via e-mail:


RUTGERS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW (CAMDEN CAMPUS) invites applications from entry-level and lateral candidates for one or more tenure-track or tenured faculty positions. Possible areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to, corporate law, corporate governance, commercial law, securities regulation, and other areas of business law. We will consider candidates with an interest in building upon our newly devised Certificate Program in Corporate/Business Law. All applicants should have a distinguished academic background and either great promise or a record of excellence in both scholarship and teaching. We encourage applications from women, people of color, persons with disabilities, and others whose background, experience, and viewpoints would contribute to the diversity of our faculty. Contact: Professor Arthur Laby, Chair, Faculty Appointments Committee; Rutgers University School of Law; 217 North Fifth Street; Camden, NJ; 08102; Rutgers University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all in every aspect of its operations.

August 4, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporate Governance, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School, Securities Regulation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 3, 2015

The University of Nebraska is Hiring

My law school, the University of Nebraska, is hiring. Here are the details:

Entry-Level or Experienced Faculty Position

The UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA COLLEGE OF LAW invites applications for entry-level and lateral candidates for one or more tenure-track or tenured faculty positions. Our curricular needs include Business Associations, Evidence, Wills and Trusts, and Civil Procedure. Other needs include courses related to

  • Criminal Law (e.g., Federal Criminal Law or White Collar Crime, Criminal Procedure 2, Post­Conviction Remedies, or Criminal Sentencing);
  • Health Care (e.g., Federal Regulation of Health Care Providers, Health Care Finance, Torts, Administrative Law, Medical Malpractice, Privacy Law, Law and Medicine, Public Health Law, Bioethics and the Law, and the Law of Provider and Patient);
  • Litigation Skills and Related Courses (e.g., Trial Advocacy, Civil Rights Litigation, Pretrial Litigation or other litigation skills courses, Conflicts of Laws);
  • Business Law (e.g., Corporate Finance, Corporate Governance, Insurance Law, Bankruptcy, Corporate Restructuring, Nonprofit Organizations, Risk Management / Compliance, or White Collar Crime);
  • Patent Law and International Intellectual Property;
  • Family Law;
  • Education Law; and
  • Election Law.

Minimum Required Qualifications: J.D Degree or Equivalent, Superior Academic Record, Demonstrated Interest in Relevant Substantive Areas. Title of Asst/Assoc/or Full Professor will be based on qualifications of applicant.  Please fill out the University application, which can be found at, and upload a CV, a cover letter, and a list of references.  General information about the Law College is available at The University of Nebraska-Lincoln is committed to a pluralistic campus community through affirmative action, equal opportunity, work-life balance, and dual careers.  Review of applications will begin on August 20, 2015, and continue until the position is filled. Contact Associate Dean Richard Moberly, Chair, Faculty Appointments Committee, University of Nebraska College of Law, Lincoln, NE 68583-0902, or send an email to

 Civil Clinical Position

The UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA COLLEGE OF LAW invites applications for entry-level and lateral candidates for a tenure-track faculty position to teach in its Civil Clinic. The position may also include teaching a classroom law school course on evidence, pretrial litigation, trial advocacy, or related subjects. In Fall 2016, Nebraska Law will open a new, state-of-the-art clinic building to house all of its clinics together.
Minimum Required Qualifications: J.D Degree or Equivalent, Superior Academic Record, Demonstrated Interest in Relevant Substantive Areas. Title of Asst/Assoc/or Full Clinical Professor will be based on qualifications of applicant.  General information about the Law College is available at Please fill out the University application, which can be found at, and upload a CV, a cover letter, and a list of references. The University of Nebraska‑Lincoln is committed to a pluralistic campus community through affirmative action, equal opportunity, work-life balance, and dual careers. Review of applications will begin on August 20, 2015 and continue until the position is filled. Contact Associate Dean Richard Moberly, Chair, Faculty Appointments Committee, University of Nebraska College of Law, Lincoln, NE 68583-0902, or send an email to


I'm not on our Appointments Committee, but feel free to contact me if you have any questions, particularly about our business law needs.

August 3, 2015 in Business Associations, C. Steven Bradford, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Should We Include More International Materials in the Basic Business Associations and Securities Regulation Courses?

Joan Heminway’s post last week about comparative corporate law  got me thinking about international coverage in my own courses. Joan’s post reviewed a book designed for a stand-alone comparative corporate law course, but I’ve been wondering whether we should include more comparative material in the basic business associations and securities regulation courses.

The case for discussing the corporate and securities law of other countries is clear. Capital markets are becoming increasingly global. U.S. companies are selling securities in other countries and U.S. investors are investing in foreign companies. Initially, globalization affected primarily large multinational companies, but with the expanding use of the Internet to sell securities, even the smallest business can offer securities to investors in other countries.

Under the internal affairs rule, it’s the corporate law of the country of incorporation that’s important, no matter where the lawyer is practicing or where the corporation or the shareholder is located. And a company selling securities to investors outside the U.S. needs to consider the effect of other countries’ securities laws. Foreign counsel may be retained to deal with such issues, but shouldn’t the U.S. lawyer have at least a rudimentary understanding of foreign corporate and securities laws and how they differ from U.S. law?

I spend no time on comparative analysis in either my business associations or my securities regulation course.

I could blame the textbook authors. The book I use in Business Associations includes almost nothing about corporate law outside the United States. That’s typical. Franklin Gevurtz has written a wonderful supplement on comparative corporate law, Global Issues in Corporate Law, but business associations casebooks generally ignore comparative issues.

The book I use for Securities Regulation covers the application of U.S. registration requirements and antifraud rules to transactions outside the United States, but it doesn’t discuss foreign securities law. (A prior edition did, but that material was eliminated from the most recent edition.) This book’s approach is also typical. Other securities regulation casebooks cover the extraterritorial application of U.S. law, but offer little or no comparative analysis of the law of other jurisdictions.

The casebook authors ought to do more, but that’s an inadequate excuse. I include a lot of supplemental material that isn’t in the textbook, especially in Business Associations. It wouldn’t be too hard for me to create supplemental material to add a comparative perspective to my courses.

Perhaps this is just one of those areas where I have fallen into the rut of teaching what my professors taught me. My memory may be faulty, but I don’t recall any international coverage when I took those courses 30+ years ago—which is interesting, because my Corporations professor, Detlev Vagts, was a noted international law scholar.

But it’s mostly an issue of time. At most law schools, corporate and securities law is crammed into a few credit hours, unlike constitutional law other, more favored subjects I won’t name. I, like most corporate law teachers, don’t have the luxury of adding topics. It’s hard enough to cram agency, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability companies, corporations, and some securities law into a single four-hour Business Associations course.

Nevertheless, I’m going to review my coverage carefully and see if I can sneak in more comparative materials. In today’s global environment, even students in Nebraska ought to be exposed to at least some foreign corporate and securities law.

August 3, 2015 in Business Associations, C. Steven Bradford, Law School, Securities Regulation, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (3)

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Hey! We're Hiring at The University of Tennessee

As you may have seen elsewhere already (but just to make it abundantly clear):

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF LAW invites applications from both entry-level and lateral candidates for as many as two full-time, tenure-track faculty positions to commence in the Fall Semester 2016. The College is particularly interested in the subject areas of business law, including business associations and contracts; gratuitous transfers/trusts and estates; and health law. Other areas of interest include legal writing, torts, and property.

A J.D. or equivalent law degree is required. Successful applicants must have a strong academic background. Significant professional experience is desirable. Candidates also must have a strong commitment to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service.

In furtherance of the University’s and the College’s fundamental commitment to diversity among our faculty, students body, and staff, we strongly encourage applications from people of color, persons with disabilities, women, and others whose background, experience, and viewpoints would contribute to a diverse law school environment.

The Faculty Appointments Committee will interview applicants who are registered in the 2015 Faculty Appointments Register of the Association of American Law Schools at the AALS Faculty Recruitment Conference in Washington, D.C. Applicants who are not registered in the AALS Faculty Appointments Register are advised to send a letter of interest, resume, and the names and contact information of three references by September 30, 2015 to:

Sean Gunter
On behalf of Becky Jacobs and Michael Higdon
Co-Chairs, Faculty Appointments Committee
The University of Tennessee College of Law
1505 W. Cumberland Avenue
Knoxville, TN 37996-1810

All qualified applicants will receive equal consideration for employment and admissions without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability, or covered veteran status. Eligibility and other terms and conditions of employment benefits at The University of Tennessee are governed by laws and regulations of the State of Tennessee, and this non-discrimination statement is intended to be consistent with those laws and regulations. In accordance with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, The University of Tennessee affirmatively states that it does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, or disability in its education programs and activities, and this policy extends to employment by the University. Inquiries and charges of violation of Title VI (race, color, and national origin), Title IX (sex), Section 504 (disability), ADA (disability), Age Discrimination in Employment Act (age), sexual orientation, or veteran status should be directed to the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED), 1840 Melrose Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37996-3560, telephone (865) 974-2498. Requests for accommodation of a disability should be directed to the ADA Coordinator at the Office of Equity and Diversity.

I hope a number of our readers will be interested in applying.  Feel free to contact me if you have questions or need more information (although please note that I am not on the Faculty Appointments Committee).

August 1, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporations, Joan Heminway, Jobs, Law School, Unincorporated Entities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Funding Tips from Angel Investors and Venture Capitalists

Last week I attended a panel discussion with angel investors and venture capitalists hosted by Refresh Miami. Almost two hundred entrepreneurs and tech professionals attended the summer startup series to learn the inside scoop on fundraising from panelists Ed Boland, Principal Scout Ventures; Stony Baptiste, Co-Founder & Principal, Urban.Us, Venture Fund; Brad Liff, Founder & CEO, Fitting Room Social, Private Equity Expert; and (the smartest person under 30 I have ever met) Herwig Konings, Co-Founder & CEO of Accredify, Crowd Funding Expert. Because I was typing so fast on my iPhone, I didn’t have time to attribute my notes to the speakers. Therefore, in no particular order, here are the nuggets I managed to glean from the panel.

1) In the seed stage, it’s more than an idea but less than a business. If it’s before true market validation you are in the seed round. At the early stage, there has been some form of validation, but the business is not yet sustainable. Everything else beyond that is the growth stage.

2) The friend and family round is typically the first $50-75,000. Angels come in the early stage and typically invest up to $500,000.

3) The seed rounds often overlap with angels and businesses can raise from $500,000 to $1,000,000. If you have a validated part of a business model but are not self funding then you are at Series A investment stage.  You still need outside capital despite validation. The Series A round often nets between $3-5 million and then there are subsequent rounds for growth until the liquidity event which is either the IPO or acquisition.

4) Venture capitalists are investing their LPs' money and often the LP will co-invest with the VC. Their ultimate goal is for the company to get acquired or go public.

5) At the early stages some VCs will show a deal to other investors if it looks good. Later stage VCs will become more competitive and will keep the information and good deals to themselves.

6) It’s important to find a lead investor or lead angel to champion your idea.

7) Not all funding is helpful. Some panelists discussed the concepts of “fallen angels” or “devils,” which were once helpful but now are not providing value but still take up time and energy that could be better spent focusing on building the business. “False angels” are those who could never have been helpful in the first place.

8) You don’t want to be the first or the last check the angel is writing. You want to get references on the angel investor and see where they have invested and what their plan is for you.

9) There is smart money and dumb money. Smart money gives money and additional resources or value. Dumb money just gives money and nothing else. It’s passive and doesn’t jump into the business (note the panelists disagreed as to whether this was a good or bad thing). Another panelist noted the distinction between helpful and harmful money. Harmful people think they are helpful and give advice when they don’t have a lot to add but take up a lot of time. Sometimes helpful money just gives a check and then gets out of the way. It’s the people in between that can cause the problems.

10) VCs and angels invest in teams as well as ideas. They look for the right fit and a mix of veteran entrepreneurs, a team/product fit, a mix of technical and nontechnical people, professionals whose reputations and resumes can be verified. They want to know whether the people they are investing in have been in a competitive environment and have learned from success or failure.

11) Crowdfunding can be complicated because investors don’t meet the entrepreneurs. They see everything on the web so the reputation and the need for a good team is even more important.

12) Convertible notes are the “gold standard” according to one speaker and it’s the workhorse for funding. There was some discussion of safe notes, but most panelists didn't have a lot of experience with them and that was echoed this week by attorney David Salmon, who advises small businesses and holds his own monthly meetups. One panelist said that the sole purpose of safe notes was to avoid landmines that can blow up the company. Another panelist indicated that from an investor standpoint it’s like a blackhole because it’s so new and people don’t know what happens if something goes wrong.

13) The panelists indicated that businesses need to watch out for: the maturity date for their debt (how long is the runway); when can the investors call the note and possibly bankrupt the company; how will quirky covenants affect the next round of financing and where later investors will fall in line; and covenants that are easy to violate.

14) There was very little discussion of Regulation A+ but it did raise some interest and the possibility to raise even more funds from non-accredited investors. Only 3% of the eight million who can invest through crowdfunding actually do, so Reg A+ may help with that.

16) All of the panelists agreed that entities may start out as LLCs but they will have to convert to a C Corp to get any VC funding.

There was a lot more discussion but this post is already too long. Because I've never been an angel nor sought such funding, I don’t plan to provide any analysis on what I’ve typed above. My goal in attending this and the other monthly events like this was to learn from the questions that entrepreneurs ask and how the investors answer. Admittedly, most of my students won’t be dealing with these kind of issues, but I still introduce them to these concepts so they are at least familiar with the parlance if not all of the nuances.

July 30, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporate Finance, Corporate Governance, Corporations, Current Affairs, Entrepreneurship, Financial Markets, International Business, Law School, Legislation, LLCs, Securities Regulation, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 24, 2015

Professors: Take a Survey of Your Use of Popular Culture in Teaching

Cynthia Bond, a professor at John Marshall Law School, is surveying law professors on their use of popular culture in teaching. Here's Professor Bond's call for participants:

Greetings Law Teacher Colleagues:

I am working on an article this summer on uses of popular culture in the law school classroom.  I am defining popular culture broadly to include mass culture texts like movies, TV shows, popular music, images which circulate on the internet, etc, and also any current events that you may reference in the classroom which are not purely legal in nature (i.e. not simply a recent court decision).

To support this article, I am doing a rather unscientific survey to get a sense of what law professors are doing in this area.  If you are a law professor and you use popular culture in your class, I would be most grateful if you could answer this quick, anonymous survey I have put together:

Thanks in advance for your time and have a wonderful rest of summer!

Cynthia Bond
The John Marshall Law School
Chicago, Il

The survey only takes a few minutes, so, if you're a law professor, it won't take much time to support a colleague's research.

July 24, 2015 in C. Steven Bradford, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)