Thursday, April 28, 2016

Visiting Tax Professor Position at Tulane

Hello, everyone - I'm passing this along in case any of our readers have an interest, or know anyone who might have an interest.  And if anyone needs convincing as to why they should spend a semester or a year in New Orleans, email me privately and allow me to extol the city's virtues.

Tulane Law School is currently accepting applications for a visiting tax professor for either the Fall of 2016 or for the entire 2016-2017 Academic Year.  Visitors would be expected to teach basic Income Tax and other tax related courses.  Applicants at any career stage are encouraged.  To apply, please submit a CV along with a statement of interest and any supporting documentation.  Applications and questions may be directed to Vice Dean Ronald J. Scalise Jr. at rscalise@tulane.edu.   Tulane University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to excellence through diversity.  All eligible candidates are invited to apply. 

 

April 28, 2016 in Ann Lipton, Jobs, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Managing Director, Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business at Georgia Tech

Some readers may be interested in the position listed below. Georgia Institute of Technology, Scheller College of Business has a strong faculty and is a recognized leader in the sustainability area.

---------------------

Managing Director, Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business

(Professor of the Practice or Academic Professional)

The Scheller College of Business at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia seeks applications or nominations for an academic appointment as the Managing Director, Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business (ACSB). The Center is part of the Scheller College of Business, which was ranked #1 in the US and #8 globally in the 2015 Corporate Knights Better World MBA Rankings. The College is a dynamic environment with a commitment to sustainability embedded in its strategic plan and faculty members across many disciplines who have sustainable business interests. The Managing Director will have the opportunity to shape and steer the growth of the Center’s activities and impact, as the Center recently received a long-term gift doubling its operational budget from the Ray C. Anderson Foundation. The Managing Director will also have the opportunity to partner with the Georgia Tech Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain (CSLS), an institute-wide undergraduate education initiative that is developing learning and co-curricular opportunities designed to help our students combine their academic and career interests with their desire to create sustainable communities.

More information follows after the break.

Continue reading

March 30, 2016 in Business School, CSR, Entrepreneurship, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Stanford Corporate Governance Fellowship (Hat Tip to Current Fellow Cathy Hwang)

The Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University seeks to hire a resident academic fellow to begin in September or October 2016 for a 12-month or one-academic-year term, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The fellow will pursue his or her own independent research, as well as work closely with Stanford Law School faculty on a range of projects related to corporate governance, securities regulation, vehicles for public and private investment, and financial market reform. The ideal candidate has excellent academic credentials and experience in relevant fields of practice. The position is particularly well suited to a practicing attorney, with either a litigation or transactional background, seeking a transition to academia, or a post-doctoral economics or finance student with interests in corporate governance. More information can be found at https://stanfordcareers.stanford.edu/job-search?jobId=70496

March 29, 2016 in Corporate Governance, Joan Heminway, Jobs, Research/Scholarhip, Securities Regulation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 28, 2016

Not All Contract Attorneys Are Alike . . . Or Are They?

There's been a lot of bad press lately about contract lawyers.  Between legal actions for overtime pay and articles in bar publications and elsewhere, it's easy to conclude that all of these warriors in the legal workforce are overworked and underpaid in this post-financial-crisis world.

Yet, I just had a corporate general counsel in my Advanced Business Associations class last week who regularly uses contract counsel and, based on his description, those he works with seem to be a relatively contented lot.  He has gone ahead and hired a few of them (although he notes that some prefer independent contractor status for its flexibility).  So, I wonder whether many of us make the same mistake with the press on contract lawyers that we do with the press on law schools: generalizing a description and drawing conclusions from limited, nonscientific data (i.e., one-sided or narrowly drawn press reports). For one thing, most of what I read focuses on contract lawyers performing e-discovery reviews or rote due diligence.  I know that there are more varied assignments out there (even if those two areas represent most of the territory).

I do know former students who, for a variety of reasons, have worked as contract lawyers after graduation or during a career interruption.  In most cases, this has been intended as and has been in fact a temporary position.  But (although I do not stay in touch with everyone after graduation) I am sure that some have ended up staying in contract lawyering longer than they had planned . . . or wanted.  Still, I have not heard about any abusive behavior or unusually long hours.  I have heard complaints about the routine and unstimulating nature of much of the work.

What information do you have about contract lawyers?  Are they a uniformly mistreated lot because employers--especially maybe Big Law and other large firms--take advantage of them and view them only as low-cost, low-quality providers of legal services?  How often do those who use contract lawyer services hire the lawyers in as employees?  How many contract lawyers continue in that role for more than two years?  Let me know what you know.

March 28, 2016 in Joan Heminway, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 19, 2016

2016-17 Business Law Faculty Visitor Sought - The University of Tennessee College of Law

I am posting this at the request of our Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Alex Long:

The University of Tennessee invites applications for a possible visiting professor for the fall or spring semester in 2016-17. The position would involve teaching Business Associations and one other business-related course (including, perhaps, Contracts I or II). If interested, please submit a CV and cover letter via email to Alex Long, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Professor of Law, The University of Tennessee College of Law at along23@utk.edu. Prior teaching experience (law school or broader university teaching) is strongly preferred. The closing date for applications is Monday, February 29, 2016.

I also am happy to respond to questions about this opening.

February 19, 2016 in Business Associations, Joan Heminway, Jobs, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Legislated Discrimination Is Terrible for Business

My home state in West Virginia is struggling.  The economy is struggling because two of the state's main industries -- coal and natural gas -- are facing falling production (coal) and low prices (gas). Severance taxes for the state account for approximately 13% of the budget, and both are down dramatically. Tax revenues for the state were down $9.8 million in January from the prior year and came up $11.5 million short of estimates.  For the year-to-date, the state collected $2.29 billion, which is $169.5 million below estimates. Oddly enough, state sales and income taxes for January both exceeded estimates, but not enough to offset other stagnation in the state.  

The state has long been known as a coal state, and that industry has dominated the legal and political landscape.  West Virginia has been criticized for having a legal system that is "anti-business," with the United States Chamber of Commerce finding stating that West Virginia is the 50th ranked state in terms of the fairness of its litigation. (See PDF here.) CNBC (with input from the National Association of Manufacturers) also ranked West Virginia last in terms of business competitiveness, so the starting point is not good.  

Now, the West Virginia legislature is considering the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which many (including me) see as about legalizing specific forms of discrimination, and not promoting or supporting religion.  And some religious groups agree.  As the Catholic Committee of Appalachia’s West Virginia Chapter explains: 

We appreciate the background of 1993 federal act with the same name, and the history leading up to it, with its pertinence to protecting Native American sacred lands and religious practices from governmental infringement. With the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision that RFRA would only be applicable to federal actions, we can recognize, also, the value of an argument for versions of a law to be passed at the local level. However, the primary motivation behind West Virginia’s bill #4012, and others like it, seems not to be the protection of legitimate religious exercises, but securing the ability of religious groups to discriminate against marginalized populations on the basis of religious convictions.

Just as important for purposes of this post, many West Virginia businesses oppose the bill.  Local Embassy Suites and Marriott hotels representatives spoke out against the bill, and the Charleston (WV) Regional Chamber of Commerce and Generation West Virginia, along with several city mayors, have opposed the bill, as well.  They have good reason.  When the state of Indiana passed a similar bill, Indianapolis promptly lost as many as twelve conventions and estimates around $60 million.  Ouch. As one mayor said, West Virginia legislators need to "Get out of the way." 

Morgantown, home to my institution, was the state’s second city to pass an LGBT non-discrimination ordinance in February 2014. West Virginia University’s faculty senate also unanimously yesterday approved a resolution condemning the bill. And there was a chance to make clear the intent of the bill was not intended to be used as a way to discriminate against someone based sexual orientation through a proposed amendment making that clear. Unfortunately, the amendment was deemed “not germane.”

Beyond coal, natural gas, chemicals, and timber, tourism is one of our state's main industries. It's also a great one. From whitewater rafting to skiing to hiking, the state is a great place for outdoor activities.  Craft breweries and a few great local restaurants are helping make the state a destination.  Unfortunately, the debate about this bill, especially in the wake of the backlash in Indiana, is hurting the state's ability to make build up it's tourism industry by making many people feel unwelcome.  

It's really too bad as a local restaurant, Atomic Grill, made international news for how they responded to comments about their waitresses and has been lauded for their response to other intolerance in their restaurant.  

I don't like this bill because, to me, it's either a tautology or an attempt to discriminate through legislation.  But beyond that, it's stupid, terrible way to promote business in the state.  We spend enough time trying to get people to come visit -- and when people do, they almost always like it. It really is a great place in so many ways.  At a time when the entire state is looking at 4% budget cuts across the board -- when we need to be building bridges to broader audiences -- the state's legislature is screwing around with bills that have zero economic upside and reinforce stereotypes about the people of our state.   

Being pro-business means being pro-consumer, which really means being pro-people.  This bill is none of those.  We need to do better, and it's disappointing our time and our money are being wasted like this.  

February 9, 2016 in Current Affairs, Jobs, Joshua P. Fershee, Law and Economics, Religion | Permalink | Comments (3)

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Villanova Law Professor Position and Updated Job Lists

From the Faculty Lounge: "Villanova University - Charles Widger School of Law seeks an outstanding lawyer/educator/scholar to teach business law and entrepreneurship courses, broadly defined, and to serve as the Faculty Director for The John F. Scarpa Center for Law and Entrepreneurship." More information available here.

Updated Law Professor (Business Areas) Position List.

Updated Legal Studies Professor Position List (Mostly Business Schools).

At this point in the year, I imagine that some, if not many, of the positions on the list may be filled.

January 28, 2016 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Western Illinois University - Legal Studies Professor Position

    Western Illinois University is advertising a tenure track legal studies professor opening.

    Applications can be completed here. Application screening begins on February 1, 2016. 

    Details available under the break.

Continue reading

January 6, 2016 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Law Professor Job Lists Updated

I have updated my legal studies professor (mostly in business schools) and law professor (in business areas) job lists.

Positions at Western Illinois University and Regent University School of Law are recent additions. 

December 23, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Teaching the Corporate Counsel of Tomorrow

A number of months back, the Business Law Prof Blog hosted a series of five posts by Marcos Antonio Mendoza (here, here, here, here, and here) that were quite popular.  He wrote about (among other things) the need to educate students for the evolving roles in which they may serve as corporate counsel.  His recent article on corporate counsel.com offers much food for thought along those lines and serves as a good reminder, as we head into a new semester, of what our students may need long-term in the workplace.  In both this article and his earlier BLPB posts, Marcos is reacting to an academic research paper, "Finding the Right Corporate Legal Strategy" (available to subscribers or for purchase), published last year in the MIT Sloan Management Review by Professor Robert C. Bird of the University of Connecticut School of Business and Professor David Orozco from the Florida State University College of Business.

Although you all should read Marcos's Corporate Counsel article (and his posts) for yourselves, I will offer a few quotes from the article and related law school instruction take-aways here.  These largely repeat and reframe Marcos's own observations in his BLPB posts.

  • "[T]he most successful companies determine which of five legal strategies is the most effective in their legal environment, and then deploy their legal resources to accomplish their goals." The five legal strategies are avoidance, compliance, prevention, value, and transformation.  We would be doing our students a great service in identifying and explaining these five strategies and showing the students how legal doctrine, theory, and policy connect with the strategies.
  • "One of the most effective ways for companies to promote . . . attorney education [about business issues] is through job rotations, in which counsel are temporarily assigned to managerial positions in the business units they support."  Courses in the standard law school curriculum--and even new offerings focusing on business skills (e.g., reading and interpreting financial statements)--obviously do not (cannot) serve this function, although some clinic and simulation experiences offer students a limited exposure to business issues.  We should consider designing field placements, internships, externships, etc. for business law students to give them some quality, sustained exposure to business issues.
  • "[E]xecutives should create a cross-functional strategic team composed of lawyers and operational business managers who are guided by the chief legal strategist. The team’s responsibility is to hypothesize legal strategies that have a clear impact on a profit-loss statement."  Can we model these strategic teams for our students? Can a consciously constructed curricular or co-curricular program with a business school (easier to accomplish for those of us in universities) offer a useful experience of this kind to our students?

Again, as we finalize course planning and syllabi for (and, in general, think about) the new semester, the types of educational experiences identified by Marcos in his earlier posts--including those highlighted here--are well worth bearing in mind.

December 16, 2015 in Joan Heminway, Jobs, Law School, Lawyering | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 11, 2015

Business Law Professor Positions at Western Carolina University

WCU

Western Carolina University is looking to hire three business law faculty members: two tenure-track and one for a fixed term.

Descriptions of the positions are available under the break. Western Carolina University is one of the few universities in the country with an undergraduate degree in Business Administration and Law. In the spring of 2014, I presented at WCU. They have thoughtful professors, a beautiful campus, and engaged students.

I have updated my lists of legal studies professor openings and law school (business area) professor openings.

Continue reading

December 11, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Georgetown Law Graduate Clinical Teaching Fellowship

I recently received information about this social enterprise & nonprofit clinical teaching fellowship position at Georgetown University Law Center. My friend, Georgetown law professor Alicia Plerhoples, is the director of the clinic, and the fellowship sounds like an excellent opportunity.

------

Georgetown Law Graduate Clinical Teaching Fellowship

Description of the Clinic 

The Social Enterprise & Nonprofit Law Clinic at Georgetown University Law Center offers pro bono corporate and transactional legal services to social enterprises, nonprofit organizations, and select small businesses headquartered in Washington, D.C. and working locally or internationally. Through the Clinic, law students learn to translate theory into practice by engaging in the supervised practice of law for educational credit. The Clinic’s goals are consistent with Georgetown University's long tradition of public service. The Clinic’s goals are to:

  • Teach law students the materials, expectations, strategies, and methods of transactional lawyering, as well as an appreciation for how transactional law can be used in the public interest.
  • Represent social enterprises and nonprofit organizations in corporate and transactional legal matters.
  • Facilitate the growth of social enterprise in the D.C. area.

The clinic’s local focus not only allows the Clinic to give back to the community it calls home, but also gives students an opportunity to explore and understand the challenges and strengths of the D.C. community beyond the Georgetown Law campus. As D.C. experiences increasing income inequality, it becomes increasingly important for the Clinic to provide legal assistance to organizations that serve and empower vulnerable D.C. communities. Students are taught how to become partners in enterprise for their clients with the understanding that innovative transactional lawyers understand both the legal and non-legal incentive structures that drive business organizations.

Description of Fellowship

The two-year fellowship is an ideal position for a transactional lawyer interested in developing teaching and supervisory abilities in a setting that emphasizes a dual commitment—clinical education of law students and transactional law employed in the public interest. The fellow will have several areas of responsibility, with an increasing role as the fellowship progresses. Over the course of the fellowship, the fellow will: (i) supervise students in representing nonprofit organizations and social enterprises on transactional, operational, and corporate governance matters, (ii) share responsibility for teaching seminar sessions, and (iii) share in the administrative and case handling responsibilities of the Clinic. Fellows also participate in a clinical pedagogy seminar and other activities designed to support an interest in clinical teaching and legal education. Successful completion of the fellowship results in the award of an L.L.M. in Advocacy from Georgetown University. The fellowship start date is August 1, 2016, and the fellowship is for two years, ending July 31, 2018.

Qualifications

Applicants must have at least 3 years of post J.D. legal experience. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in a transactional area of practice such as nonprofit law and tax, corporate law, intellectual property, real estate, or finance. Applicants with a strong commitment to economic justice are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be admitted or willing to be admitted to the District of Columbia Bar. 

Application Process 

To apply, send a resume, an official or unofficial law school transcript, and a detailed letter of interest by December 15, 2015.  The letter should be no longer than two pages and address a) why you are interested in this fellowship; b) what you can contribute to the Clinic; c) your experience with transactional matters and/or corporate law; and d) anything else that you consider pertinent. Please address your application to Professor Alicia Plerhoples, Georgetown Law, 600 New Jersey Ave., NW, Suite 434, Washington, D.C. 20001, and email it to socialenterprise@law.georgetown.edu. Emailed applications are preferred. More information about the clinic can be found at www.socialenterprise-gulaw.org.

Teaching fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $53,500 (taxable), health and dental benefits, and all tuition and fees in the LL.M. program.  As full-time students, teaching fellows qualify for deferment of their student loans. In addition, teaching fellows may be eligible for loan repayment assistance from their law schools.

October 29, 2015 in Haskell Murray, Jobs, Social Enterprise, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Boise State University - Legal Studies Professor Position

I recently received the following e-mail announcement. Accordingly, I have updated my list of law professor positions outside of law schools:

-----

The Department of Management in the College of Business and Economics, Boise State University,  invites applications for a tenure track faculty position in the area of Legal Studies in Business.

Management hosts the most majors in the College of Business and Economics, with over 1000 students currently majoring in General Business, Entrepreneurship Management, Human Resource Management, or International Business, and provides courses in four MBA programs. We are housed in the impressive Micron Business and Economics Building, which opened in the summer of 2012. The College of Business and Economics is AACSB-accredited.

Recognized as a university on the move, Boise State University is the largest university in Idaho, with enrollment of more than 22,000 students. The University is located in the heart of Idaho’s capital city, a growing metropolitan area that serves as the government, business, high-tech, economic, and cultural center of the state. Time Magazine ranked Boise #1 in 2014 for ‘getting it right’ with a thriving economy, a booming cultural scene, quality health care, and a growing university. Livability.com also ranked Boise first among the top 10 cities to raise a family in 2014 thanks to an abundant quality of life, a family-friendly culture, a vibrant downtown, and great outdoor recreation. To further enhance the superb quality of life Boise offers, the University has committed to sustaining the conditions necessary for faculty to enter and thrive in their academic careers, while meeting personal and family responsibilities.

Boise State University embraces and welcomes diversity in its faculty, student body, and staff. Accordingly, candidates who would add to the diversity and excellence of our academic community are encouraged to apply and to include in their cover letter information about how they can help us further these goals.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • J.D. degree with an excellent academic record from an ABA accredited law school.
  • Potential for outstanding teaching and research.
  • Willingness to be active in professional, university, and community service activities.

Preferred Qualifications: 

  • MBA or other advanced business related degree.
  • Demonstrated ability to engage in high quality teaching, including online teaching experience.
  • Journal publications in refereed, peer-reviewed business journals, legal journals, or law reviews.
  • Significant professional experience as a lawyer.
  • Ability and experience teaching and doing research across disciplines (e.g. accounting, health care law, economics) is a plus.

October 7, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Albany Law School - Associate Dean and Professor Postions

University of Kentucky College of Law - Commercial and Business Law Professor Position

Kentucky

The University of Kentucky College of Law recently posted an announcement of their professor opening in the commercial and business law areas

My updated list of law schools hiring in the business law area is here.

My updated list of non-law schools (mostly business schools) hiring law professors is here.

September 30, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 27, 2015

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Hiring in Business and Tax Law

As mentioned in my post about law schools hiring in business law areas, we received the following posting from The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law.

------

University of Utah Hiring in Business and Tax Law

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of associate professor beginning academic year 2016-2017. Qualifications for the position include a record of excellence in academics, successful teaching experience or potential as a teacher, and strong scholarly distinction or promise. The College is particularly interested in candidates in the areas of business and tax law. Interested persons can submit an application to the University of Utah Human Resources website at https://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/43173 (please note that the application requires a cover letter, CV, and list of references). Baiba Hicks, Administrative Assistant to the Faculty Appointments Committee (Baiba.hicks@law.utah.edu or 801-581-5464) is available to answer questions.

The University of Utah is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and educator and its policies prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, religion, age, status as a person with a disability, or veteran’s status. Minorities, women, veterans, and those with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified veterans. To inquire further about the University’s nondiscrimination and affirmative action policies or to request a reasonable accommodation for a disability in the application process, please contact the following individual who has been designated as the University’s Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 South Presidents Circle, Rm. 135, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, (801)581-8365, email: oeo@utah.edu.

August 27, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 24, 2015

Belmont University (Massey College of Business) Professor Position - Healthcare Management/Health Law

Belmont University's Massey College of Business (my employer) has an open Assistant Professor of Management position that may interest some of our readers.

As stated below, a PHD in Management and/or a JD is required. Healthcare management expertise is strongly preferred. The recently retired professor whose line we are filling was a JD, MBA, RN with significant healthcare management and health law experience. I am not on the hiring committee, but am happy to discuss Belmont University in general, and I can point interested parties in the right direction.

The online application can be accessed here.

---

The College of Business Administration at Belmont University is seeking applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning August 2015.

The faculty member in this position will teach both graduate and undergraduate management classes. The area of specialization/certification that will be given preference for this position is healthcare management. Ability and willingness to teach healthcare law, patient-centered care, business law, principles of management, and/or strategic management is preferred. Clinical experience or familiarity with the clinical setting will be looked upon quite favorably, as well.  Candidates should be able to demonstrate a well-developed research agenda with promise of publishing in high quality, peer reviewed management or business law journals.

An interest and/or experience in engaging students in undergraduate research will be considered favorably, as will teaching experience at the university level.  Completion of a Ph.D. in management from an AACSB or CAHME accredited/AUPHA member institution by the time of employment is required. A Doctorate of Jurisprudence (JD) is also acceptable.  Belmont University is particularly seeking applicants who can demonstrate the interest and ability to work collaboratively in course design and to teach interdisciplinary and topical courses in this program. 

Belmont University seeks to attract and retain highly qualified faculty and staff that share the University’s values and will contribute to its mission and vision to be a leader among teaching universities bringing together the best of liberal arts and professional education in a Christian community of learning and service. For additional information about the position and to complete the online application, candidates are directed to https://jobs.belmont.edu. During the application process, applicants will be asked to respond to Belmont’s mission, vision, and values statements, articulating how the candidate’s knowledge, experience, and beliefs have prepared him/her to contribute to a Christian community of learning and service and give a brief statement of teaching philosophy. An electronic version of a Cover Letter, Curriculum Vitae, List of References, Teaching Philosophy, and a Response to Belmont’s Mission, Vision, and Values must be attached in order to complete the online application.  Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.

A comprehensive, coeducational university located in Nashville, Tennessee, Belmont is among the fastest growing Christian universities in the nation. Ranked No. 5 in the Regional Universities South category and named for the seventh consecutive year as one of the top “Up-and-Comer” universities by U.S. News & World Report, Belmont University consists of approximately 7,300 students who come from every state and 25 countries. The university’s purpose is to help students explore their passions and develop their talents to meet the world’s needs. With more than 75 areas of study, 20 master’s programs and four doctoral degrees, there is no limit to the ways Belmont University can expand an individual's horizon.

Belmont University is an equal opportunity employer committed to fostering a diverse learning community of committed Christians from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The selected candidate for this position will be required to complete a background check satisfactory to the University. 

August 24, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

University of Iowa Hiring Faculty

The law school in the state next door to mine is hiring faculty. Their football team isn't as good as ours, but it's a pretty good law school in spite of that deficiency. Here's the listing:

THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW anticipates hiring several tenured/tenure track faculty members and clinical faculty members (including a director for field placement program) over the coming year. Our goal is to find outstanding scholars and teachers who can extend the law school’s traditional strengths and intellectual breadth. We are interested in all persons of high academic achievement and promise with outstanding credentials. Appointment and rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. Candidates should send resumes, references, and descriptions of areas of interest to:  Faculty Appointments Committee, College of Law, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa  52242-1113.

THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply and will receive consideration for employment free from discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, age, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, religion, associational preference, status as a qualified individual with a disability, or status as a protected veteran.

August 11, 2015 in Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 7, 2015

The University of South Carolina School of Law - Professor Positions

From an e-mail I received earlier today:

-----

University of South Carolina School of Law

Hiring Advertisement

The University of South Carolina School of Law invites applications for tenured, tenure-track, or visiting faculty positions to begin fall semester 2016. Candidates should have a juris doctorate or equivalent degree. Additionally, a successful applicant should have a record of excellence in academia or in practice, the potential to be an outstanding teacher, and demonstrable scholarly promise.  Although the School of Law is especially interested in candidates who are qualified to teach in the areas of taxation, clinical legal education, environmental law and small business, we are equally interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity of our law school community whose teaching interests may fall outside of these areas. 

Interested persons should send a resume, references, and subject area preferences to Prof. Eboni Nelson, Chair, Faculty Selection Committee, c/o Kim Fanning, University of South Carolina School of Law, 701 S. Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 or, by email, to HIRE2016@LAW.SC.EDU (electronic The University of South Carolina is committed to a diverse faculty, staff, and student body.  We encourage applications from women, minorities, persons with disabilities, and others whose background, experience, and viewpoints contribute to the diversity of our institution. The University of South Carolina is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the base of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, sexual orientation, gender, or veteran status.

August 7, 2015 in Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Law Schools Hiring in Business Areas 2015-16

Earlier I posted a list of business schools hiring in legal studies.

This post includes a list of law schools that have listed business law as an area of interest.* I will use the PrawfsBlawg spreadsheet and other sources to update this list from time to time.

Feel free to send me any additions or leave additions in the comments.   

Updated Jan. 28, 2016

*Schools that have not listed any preferences, or that have provided open-ended language after preferences that do not include business law, are not included in this list. Also, given that I do not have access to the AALS ads, this list is likely incomplete and only includes schools that have posted their open positions online.  

For the purposes of this post, I include the following subject areas in the definition of "business law": banking; business associations; corporate finance; corporate governance; financial institutions; international business transactions; law & economics; law & entrepreneurship; M&A; securities regulation; unincorporated entities .

August 7, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)