Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Legal Studies Position - Wharton

Wharton

The Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania has posted a legal studies and business ethics professor opening.  As you may suspect, Wharton has an extremely strong legal studies faculty.  More information from the announcement is quoted below. 

The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania invites applications for tenured and tenure-track positions in its Department of Legal Studies and Business Ethics.  The Department has eighteen full-time faculty who teach a wide variety of business-oriented courses in law and ethics in the undergraduate, MBA, and Ph.D. programs and whose research is regularly published in leading journals.  The Wharton School has one of the largest and best-published business school faculties in the world.  In addition, the school has a global reach and perspective, as well as an interdisciplinary approach to business issues (embracing ten academic departments and over twenty research centers). 

Applicants must have either a Ph.D., J.D., or both, from an accredited institution (an expected completion date no later than July 1, 2016 is acceptable) and a demonstrated commitment to scholarship in business ethics, business law, or a combination of the two fields.  Specific areas of potential focus for hiring include corporate governance, normative ethics related to business, social impact/sustainability, securities regulation, and health law/bioethics.  The appointment is expected to begin July 1, 2015.

Please submit electronically your letter of introduction, c.v., and one selected article or writing sample in PDF format via the following website by November 1, 2014: APPLY.  Some decisions for interviews will be made before the deadline, so candidates are encouraged to apply early.

The University of Pennsylvania is an equal opportunity employer.  Minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

July 22, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 18, 2014

Woulfe on Connecticut Benefit Corporation Law

James Woulfe, who was involved in the legislative process around Connecticut benefit corporations, and I have had a number of interesting conversations about social enterprise law over the past few years.  Recently, I asked James to share his thoughts on the new Connecticut benefit corporation law for the blog.  His contribution is below.

----------------

After two previous tries, Connecticut recently became the 24th state in the Union to pass benefit corporation legislation. While some may argue that the fact it took Connecticut so long to pass the bill is a sign of problems with the legislature, our state’s business climate, etc., coming a little late to the game was actually an asset. Waiting to pass the legislation gave lawmakers an opportunity to take a look at national and international trends in social enterprise legal structures, and experiment. As a result, Connecticut tweaked the “model” benefit corporation legislation passed in other states, and included an innovative first in the nation clause in Connecticut’s statute, called a “legacy preservation provision.”

Connecticut’s legacy preservation provision gives social entrepreneurs the opportunity to preserve their company’s status as a benefit corporation in perpetuity, despite changes in company leadership or ownership. In other words, the (optional) provision locks in the company’s social or environmental mission as a fundamental part of its legal operating structure. The provision may be adopted following a waiting period of two years and unanimous approval from all shareholders, regardless of their voting rights. Once the provision is adopted, it requires the company, if liquidated, to distribute all assets after the settling of debts to one or more benefit corporations or 501(c)3 organizations with similar social missions.  

To learn more about Connecticut’s benefit corporation statute, and to take a look at the specific language of the legacy preservation provision, you can visit CTBenefitCorp.com.

About the Author:

James Woulfe is the Public Policy and Impact Investing Specialist at reSET - Social Enterprise Trust, a Hartford, Connecticut-based 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to promote, preserve and protect social enterprise as a viable concept and a business reality. You can contact James at Jwoulfe@socialenterprisetrust.org.

Cross-posted at SocEntLaw.

July 18, 2014 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Legal Studies Position - Texas A&M University-Central Texas

Central

I recently received notice of a legal studies position opening at Texas A&M University-Central Texas.  Their needs include a professor who can teach the general business law course (legal environment), as well as employment and labor law courses.  

More information, from the school, is available after the break.  

Continue reading

July 16, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Legal Studies Position - University of St. Thomas (MN)

Opus

Below is the information that I received this morning regarding a one-year Visiting Distinguished Service Faculty in Business Law position at the Opus College of Business at the University of St. Thomas (MN). In April, I spoke at a social enterprise conference at the school and was quite impressed with the facilities, faculty members, and students.  

The Department of Ethics & Business Law in the Opus College of Business at the University of St. Thomas has an opening for a one-year position as a Visiting Distinguished Service Faculty in Business Law, for the 2014-15 academic year.  This position will involve teaching three courses (including International Business Law) each semester.  To apply (and for more information about this position), visit this site: https://facultyemployment-stthomas.icims.com/jobs/1252/visiting-distinguished-service-faculty-in-business-law/job, and submit an online application (two letters of recommendation to be sent separately).  Additional questions can be directed to the search committee chair, Dale Thompson (dbthompson@stthomas.edu).

 

July 16, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 11, 2014

Business Law Professors on Twitter - Updated 7/11/14

I've updated our business law professors on Twitter list here.  

Below are tweets from some of the new additions to the list.  

 

July 11, 2014 in Business Associations, Current Affairs, Haskell Murray, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Legal Studies Position - Troy University

Troy

Troy University (in Troy, AL) has posted notice of a legal studies professor opening.  (Confusingly, the heading of the posts says "assistant/associate professor" and the body of the post says "full-time, tenure-track," but the body of the post also says that the position is for a "lecturer.")

More information at the link above or after the break.

Continue reading

July 11, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 7, 2014

Delaware Public Benefit Corporation Count as of 6/30/14

For those interested, the Delaware secretary of state's office informs me that there were 145 Delaware public benefit corporations (PBCs) as of 6/30/14.

I do not recognize the vast majority of the PBCs on the list, but better known PBCs include Method Products and Plum Organics

July 7, 2014 in Business Associations, Delaware, Haskell Murray, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 4, 2014

Hobby Lobby - Corporate Law Posts

Building on Elizabeth Pollman’s list, I have compiled post-opinion posts on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby by corporate law professors.  I imagine this list is incomplete and am happy to update the list.

Stephen Bainbridge (UCLA) (here, here, and here)

Lawrence Cunningham (George Washington) (here and here)

John Fershee (West Virginia)

Kent Greenfield (Boston College)

Sarah Hahn (Idaho)

Joan Heminway (Tennessee)

Lyman Johnson (W&L and St. Thomas-MN)

Elizabeth Pollman (Loyola-Los Angeles)

Brian Quinn (Boston College)

Usha Rodrigues (Georgia)

Anne Tucker (Georgia State)

Thanks to all for the interesting posts.  I am sure there will be more to come, followed by a flurry of articles in the fall and spring cycles.  Looking forward to reading more. 

July 4, 2014 in Business Associations, Corporate Governance, Corporations, Haskell Murray, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Legal Studies Position - California State University (Northridge)

Screening of applications begins September 15, 2014.

Applications can be sent to business.law@csun.edu or 

Department of Business Law or College of Business Administration and Economics

California State University Northridge

Northridge, CA 91330-8375 

More information here.    

 CSN

July 2, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 30, 2014

Hobby Lobby

The Burwell v. Hobby Lobby opinion is here.  5-4 in favor of Hobby Lobby. 

"As applied to closely held corporations, the HHS regulations imposing the contraceptive mandate violate RFRA.”

Sure that a number of us will have thoughts to share. 

June 30, 2014 in Business Associations, Current Affairs, Haskell Murray, Religion | Permalink | Comments (2)

Friday, June 27, 2014

Easterly on The Tyranny of Experts

On Steve Bradford’s recommendation, I chose William Easterly’s (NYU) The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor (2014) as the book for my annual beach trip with the in-laws and cousins. (Last year was Daniel Kahneman's (Princeton) Thinking, Fast and Slow – and yes, my wife’s side of the family makes fun of my beach reading material).  Easterly is an author I have wanted to read for a while now, and I still need to read some of his earlier books. 

Easterly

More after the break.

Continue reading

June 27, 2014 in Books, Ethics, Haskell Murray, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Future of Higher Education

Previously, I have written about making MOOCs more effective and online v. in-person classes.  Today, I am writing about MOOCs, online classes in general, and the future of education. This will be a relatively short post because, of course, I don’t know what the future holds. But, after the break, I will take a few guesses based on what we are already seeing.

Continue reading

June 27, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 20, 2014

Nussbaum on Liberty of Conscience

In various airports and airplanes over the past few weeks I read University of Chicago professor Martha Nussbaum’s (University of Chicago) book on religious equality in America entitled Liberty of Conscience (2008).  Even though this book predates the Hobby Lobby case, it addresses a number of underlying issues at play in the case. 

Liberty of Conscience

More after the break.

Continue reading

June 20, 2014 in Books, Constitutional Law, Current Affairs, Haskell Murray, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

Online v. In-Person Classes

I’ve recently returned from taking a course on negotiation at Harvard Law School.  This was an in-person course where I was a student, which gives me something to compare my MOOC experiences to as I address the topic of online v. in-person classes.  I provide a few of my thoughts on the topic after the break.

Continue reading

June 20, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 13, 2014

Pryor on Municipal Bankruptcy and Creditor Rights

My former colleague, Scott Pryor (Regent), recently posted an interesting article entitled Municipal Bankruptcy: When Doing Less is Best. In 2013 Professor Pryor was the Resident Scholar of the American Bankruptcy Institute.  His paper's abstract is below.  

The bankruptcy process takes as a given the pre-bankruptcy allocation of economic risk. Yet, the Bankruptcy Code permits this risk to be reallocated through the adjustment process so long as that reallocation is "fair and equitable," does not "discriminate unfairly," and is in the "best interests" of creditors. The first two look to bankruptcy law for their definitions; the third derives from state law.

Chapter 9 of the Bankruptcy Code does not resolve any conflicts among these requirements. This uncertain state of affairs generates a powerful incentive among most parties to settle. So long as the court retains the power to dismiss the case and remit the conflicts to the vagaries of state adjudication, Chapter 9 functions to create an institutional game of Chicken driving stakeholders to consensus.

June 13, 2014 in Corporate Finance, Current Affairs, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 6, 2014

Karen Valihura Nominated for Open Delaware Supreme Court Position

Today, Delaware governor Jack Markell announced his nomination of Skadden partner Karen Valihura for the open Delaware Supreme Court position.

Delaware Public Media reports:

Gov. Jack Markell is tapping Karen Valihura for a spot on the Delaware Supreme Court.

 

Markell announced his choice of the corporate lawyer Friday afternoon.

 

If confirmed by the state Senate, the 51-year old Valihura will become only the second woman to serve on Delaware’s highest court and will replace retiring Justice Jack Jacobs, who is set to step down June 24th.

 

Valihura is a partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom, LLP, a private Wilmington law firm, where she’s practiced since 1989, dealing with corporate mergers, acquisitions and fraud claims.

 

In a statement, Markell touted Valihura’s record of community service and called her an attorney of “uncommon skill, intelligence and integrity.” 

Read the remainder of the article here.

June 6, 2014 in Delaware, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (0)

ALSB Deadlines

ALSB

For those interested in the Academy of Legal Studies in Business ("ALSB") conference in Seattle (August 4-7), the deadline to upload papers is June 29, and early-bird conference registration ends on July 1. 

More information is available at the ALSB website.  The ALSB conference is the national conference for legal studies professors in business schools, though I believe that interested practitioners and law professors would also be welcome. 

Hope to see some of our readers in Seattle. 

June 6, 2014 in Business School, Conferences, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (0)

Effective MOOCs?

If you were designing a massive open online course (a "MOOC"), how would you make it as effective as possible? 

This week I am not looking at how MOOCs compare to in-person courses, but rather I am looking at how various MOOCs compare to one another. 

A few of my thoughts are below. 

Studio Filming.  Some of the earlier MOOCs, like Ben Polak's Game Theory class at Yale, simply set a camera in the room and recorded the class.  Even with a dynamic professor like Polak, this strategy did not seem to fit the medium well.  Later MOOCs, like Northwestern University's Law & Entrepreneurship course, were filmed specially for the MOOC, in what appears to be a studio of sorts.  The studio, edited versions of a course seem to produce a much more efficient and engaging experience.  To increase engagement even further, some have asked whether celebrities like Matt Damon should teach MOOCs (presumably from a script prepared by professors in the field)...or maybe professors should take acting classes.

Deadlines and Certificates.  It is well-known that the completion rate for MOOCs is miserable.  The completion rate has been reported as less than 7%.  I imagine that rate would increase significantly if the online courses were not free.  Also, while I have not seen the data, I think MOOCs with deadlines for various sections of the course and courses with certificates encourage students to stay on track and finish classes they start.  

Assessments.  I preferred the MOOCs that had online questions as you went along with the video lectures (every 10-15 minutes) rather than those that just had questions at the end, but this can be overdone if it cuts up the flow of the lecture too much. I did not mind if the MOOC had questions during both the presentations and at the end of the unit, and it was probably good to be tested on the same material twice. 

Focused Discussion Boards.  The discussion boards I have seen on MOOCs seem to be mostly a waste of time, at least the way the vast majority of the boards are currently configured.  The discussion boards are mostly the blind leading the blind and there is too much noise and too little value.  Perhaps the discussion boards could be divided by geographic location or level of education.  I’d be interested in a discussion board of MOOC users in middle Tennessee (perhaps the group would meet in person once or twice) or in a discussion board of academics from around the world.  Perhaps they could still have the “all-comers” discussion board for those who wanted to engage with the entire class, but I would have found a more limited and selected group to be more useful. 

Next week, I will talk about MOOCs v. In-Person Courses.  The New York Times recently looked at this issue in the context of Harvard Business School; I will dig into the issue and the article next week.

June 6, 2014 in Business School, Current Affairs, Haskell Murray, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 30, 2014

My MOOC Experiences

Last year, Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen said “15 years from now half of US universities may be in bankruptcy.”  

So, I guess half of our schools have about 14 more years to go, according to Christensen.

At least part of the reason for Clayton Christensen’s prediction is the rise of online education, including so-called “massive open online courses” or “MOOCs.”

Recently, I completed a few MOOCs, mostly because I wanted to learn about MOOCs first-hand.  I also picked subjects that interested me.

The courses I took were:

Yale – Game Theory (Ben Polak)

MIT – The Challenges of Global Poverty (Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo)

Northwestern – Law and the Entrepreneur (Esther Barron and Steve Reed)

I will share some of my thoughts on MOOCs during my normal Friday posting slot, in three installments: (1) Effective MOOCs? (2) MOOCs v. In-Person Courses, and (3) MOOCs and the Future of Higher Education. 

May 30, 2014 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Law School, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Business Law Professor Jobs

Babson-logoUWM

Babson College (near Boston, MA), well-known for their entrepreneurship program, recently posted a tenure track assistant or associate professor of business law position.

University of Wisconsin - Madison has posted two Clinical Assistant Professor positions in their Law & Entrepreneurship Clinic: Systems and Operations

May 29, 2014 in Business School, Entrepreneurship, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (2)