Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Boise State University - Legal Studies Professor Position

I recently received the following e-mail announcement. Accordingly, I have updated my list of law professor positions outside of law schools:


The Department of Management in the College of Business and Economics, Boise State University,  invites applications for a tenure track faculty position in the area of Legal Studies in Business.

Management hosts the most majors in the College of Business and Economics, with over 1000 students currently majoring in General Business, Entrepreneurship Management, Human Resource Management, or International Business, and provides courses in four MBA programs. We are housed in the impressive Micron Business and Economics Building, which opened in the summer of 2012. The College of Business and Economics is AACSB-accredited.

Recognized as a university on the move, Boise State University is the largest university in Idaho, with enrollment of more than 22,000 students. The University is located in the heart of Idaho’s capital city, a growing metropolitan area that serves as the government, business, high-tech, economic, and cultural center of the state. Time Magazine ranked Boise #1 in 2014 for ‘getting it right’ with a thriving economy, a booming cultural scene, quality health care, and a growing university. also ranked Boise first among the top 10 cities to raise a family in 2014 thanks to an abundant quality of life, a family-friendly culture, a vibrant downtown, and great outdoor recreation. To further enhance the superb quality of life Boise offers, the University has committed to sustaining the conditions necessary for faculty to enter and thrive in their academic careers, while meeting personal and family responsibilities.

Boise State University embraces and welcomes diversity in its faculty, student body, and staff. Accordingly, candidates who would add to the diversity and excellence of our academic community are encouraged to apply and to include in their cover letter information about how they can help us further these goals.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • J.D. degree with an excellent academic record from an ABA accredited law school.
  • Potential for outstanding teaching and research.
  • Willingness to be active in professional, university, and community service activities.

Preferred Qualifications: 

  • MBA or other advanced business related degree.
  • Demonstrated ability to engage in high quality teaching, including online teaching experience.
  • Journal publications in refereed, peer-reviewed business journals, legal journals, or law reviews.
  • Significant professional experience as a lawyer.
  • Ability and experience teaching and doing research across disciplines (e.g. accounting, health care law, economics) is a plus.

October 7, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 5, 2015

Laureate Education - First IPO for a Benefit Corporation

Alicia Plerhoples (Georgetown) has the details about the first benefit corporation IPO: Laureate Education.*

She promises more analysis on SocEntLaw (where I am also a co-editor) in the near future.

The link to Laureate Education's S-1 is here. Laureate Education has chosen the Delaware public benefit corporation statute to organize under, rather than one of the states that more closely follows the Model Benefit Corporation Legislation. I wrote about the differences between Delaware and the Model here.

Plum Organics (also a Delaware public benefit corporation) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the publicly-traded Campbell's Soup, but it appears that Laureate Education will be the first stand-alone publicly traded benefit corporation.

*Remember that there are differences between certified B corporations and benefit corporations. Etsy, which IPO'd recently, is currently only a certified B corporation. Even Etsy's own PR folks confused the two terms in their initial announcement of their certification.

October 5, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporate Finance, Corporate Governance, Corporations, CSR, Delaware, Haskell Murray, Research/Scholarhip, Securities Regulation, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 2, 2015

Social Business and Scandal

Unfortunately, touting a business as socially-consious does not seem to lessen the chance of scandal.

Some companies known for their commitment to social causes have been in the news for all the wrong reasons. A few are noted below:

Predictably, the media latches onto these stories and claims of hypocrisy fly. See, e.g., Here's The Joke Of A Sustainability Report That VW Put Out Last Year and Whole Foods Sales Sour After Price Scandal and BP's Hypocrisy Problems.

No business is perfect, so what should social businesses do to limit the impact of these scandals? First, before a scandal hits, I think social businesses need to be candid about the fact that they are not perfect. Second, after the scandal, the social business needs to take responsibility and take significant corrective action beyond what is legally required. 

Patagonia's founder does a really nice job of admitting the imperfection of his company and the struggles they face in his book The Responsible Company. Whole Foods supposedly offered somewhat above-market severance packages to laid off employees and took some corrective action in the price scandal, but I wonder if they went far enough, especially given the lofty praise for the company's social initiatives by the Whole Food's co-CEO in his book Conscious Capitalism. Whole Foods quickly admitted mistakes in the pricing scandal, but then lost points in my mind when they backtracked and claimed they were a victim of the media.

Even if social businesses take the appropriate steps, I think scandals probably hit them harder than the average business because social businesses have more customer goodwill at risk. I would love to see some empirical work on impact of scandal on social business as compared to those that do not market themselves as such; please pass any such studies my way. 

Given this post, Marcia Narine's post, and Joan Heminway's post, it is turning out to be a very pessimistic week at BLPB, but I am sure there will be good news to report in coming weeks.

October 2, 2015 in Business Associations, CSR, Ethics, Haskell Murray, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (2)

Thursday, October 1, 2015

The Midwest Academy of Legal Studies in Business (MALSB) Annual Conference - Chicago, IL - April 2016

Currently, I am planning to attend the MALSB Annual Conference in Chicago this coming April. The conference is described by the organizers below. While ALSB regional meetings like this one are usually attended mostly by legal studies professors in business schools, I am told that the conference is open to all.


The Midwest Academy of Legal Studies in Business (MALSB) Annual Conference is held in conjunction with the MBAA International Conference, long billed as “The Best Conference Value in America.”

The MBAA International Conference draws hundreds of academics and practitioners from business-related fields such as accounting, business/society/government, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, health administration, information systems, international business, management, and marketing. Although the MALSB will have its own program track on legal studies, attendees will be able to take advantage of the multidisciplinary nature of this international conference and attend sessions held by the other program tracks.

 [More details are available under the break.]

Continue reading

October 1, 2015 in Business School, Conferences, Haskell Murray, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Albany Law School - Associate Dean and Professor Postions

University of Kentucky College of Law - Commercial and Business Law Professor Position


The University of Kentucky College of Law recently posted an announcement of their professor opening in the commercial and business law areas

My updated list of law schools hiring in the business law area is here.

My updated list of non-law schools (mostly business schools) hiring law professors is here.

September 30, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 25, 2015

Majority Voting and Board Accountability

Stephen Choi (NYU), Jill Fisch (Penn), Marcel Kahan (NYU), and Ed Rock (Penn) have posted an interesting new paper entitled Does Majority Voting Improve Board Accountability?

The authors report the dramatic increase in majority voting provisions. In 2006, only 16% of the S&P 500 companies used majority voting, but by January of 2014, over 90% of the S&P 500 companies had adopted some form of majority voting. (pg. 6). As of 2012, 52% of mid-cap companies and 19% of small-cap companies had adopted majority voting provisions. (pg. 7)

For the most part, the spread of majority voting has not led to significant reduction in election of nominated directors. In over 24,000 director nominations from 2007 to 2013, at companies with majority voting provisions, "only eight (0.033%) [nominees] failed to receive a majority of 'for' votes." (pg.4)

The authors claim that their "most dramatic finding is":

a substantial difference between early and later adopters of majority voting. The early adopters of majority voting appear to be more shareholder-responsive than other firms. These firms seem to have adopted majority voting voluntarily, and the adoption of majority voting has made little difference in shareholder-responsiveness going forward. By contrast, later adopters, as a group, seem to have adopted majority voting only semi-voluntarily. Among this group, majority voting seems to have led to more shareholder-responsive behavior. (pg. 2)

As the authors suggest, their article "highlights the importance of segregating early and later adopters of the [corporate governance] innovations, because the reasons for and the effects of adoption may differ systematically between these groups." (pg. 44)

September 25, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporate Governance, Corporations, Haskell Murray, Research/Scholarhip, Shareholders | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 18, 2015

Businesses Buying "Friends"

For many businesses a good online reputation can significantly increase revenue.

Kashmir Hill, who I know from my time in NYC, has done some interesting reporting on businesses buying a good online reputation.

Earlier this week Kashmir posted the results of her undercover investigation into the problem of fake reviews, followers, and friends. When asking questions as a journalist, those selling online reviews insisted they only did real reviews on products they actually tested.

Kashmir then created a make-believe mobile karaoke business, Freakin’ Awesome Karaoke Express (a/k/a F.A.K.E), and found how easy it was to artificially inflate one's online reputation. She writes:

For $5, I could get 200 Facebook fans, or 6,000 Twitter followers, or I could get @SMExpertsBiz to tweet about the truck to the account’s 26,000 Twitter fans. A Lincoln could get me a Facebook review, a Google review, an Amazon review, or, less easily, a Yelp review.

All of this for a fake business that the reviewers had, obviously, never frequented. Some of the purchased fake reviews were surprisingly specific. In a time when many of us rely on online reviews, at least in part, this was a sobering story. It was somewhat encouraging, however, to see Yelp's recent efforts to combat fake reviews, albeit after a 2015 article by professors from Harvard Business School and Boston University showed roughly 16% of the Yelp reviews to be suspicious or fake.

Go read Kashmir's entire article, it will make you even more skeptical of reviews you read online and small businesses with tens of thousands of friends/followers.

September 18, 2015 in Business Associations, Current Affairs, Entrepreneurship, Haskell Murray, Technology, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, September 11, 2015

Puchniak and Lan on "Independent Directors"

Last week I ventured a few blocks from Belmont's campus to our neighbor Vanderbilt University Law School for their conference on The Future of International Corporate Governance

One of the many interesting papers presented was Independent Directors in Singapore: Puzzling Compliance Requiring Explanation by Dan Puchniak and Luh Luh Lan, both of the National University of Singapore.

The entire paper is worth reading, but I want to share three take-aways with our readers.

  1. "[O]nly a handful of jurisdictions [roughly 7%] have ever adopted the American concept of the independent director (i.e., where directors who are independent from management only— but not substantial shareholders—are deemed to be independent)." (pg. 6)

  2. Singapore adopted an American-style definition of "independent director" in 2001, which did not include independence from substantial shareholders. Despite this weaker definition of independence in a jurisdiction with much more concentrated shareholding than the U.S., Singapore enjoyed relative success through "functional substitutes" that limited the private benefits of control. According to the authors, these "functional substitutes" include social relationships in Family Controlled Firms ("FCFs")" and legally imposed limits on the controlling government shareholder in Government Linked Companies ("GLCs"). 

  3. Despite relative success with the American-style definition of "independent director," Singapore changed its definition "independent director" to require independence from management and 10%+ shareholders in their 2012 Corporate Code (effective at the start of 2015). This change seems prompted, at least in part, by scandals involving S-Chip companies (non-Singapore based companies that are listed on the Singapore Exchange.) The authors suggest that these S-Chip companies do not have the same "functional substitutes" as the FCFs and GLCs.

The article includes a helpful history of Singapore's recent corporate codes, and is a useful article for comparative corporate governance research. I do wonder if the "functional substitutes" explain quite as much as the authors suggest, but I highly recommend the article, especially for those interested in international corporate law.  

September 11, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporate Governance, Corporations, Family Business, Haskell Murray, International Business, International Law, Research/Scholarhip | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 4, 2015

Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Reports and Law & Entrepreneurship

Babson College has posted their Global Entrepreneurship Monitor ("GEM") Reports for 2014 (one global, one for the U.S.), available here.

The reports are valuable resources and should be read in full, but below are a few, selected quotes from the executive summary of the US GEM Report.

  • "The United States consistently exhibits among the highest entrepreneurship rates in the developed world. At 14% of the U.S. working age population, entrepreneurship levels edged upward in 2014 to reach the highest level in the 16 years GEM has assessed this activity. This represents approximately 24 million Americans starting or running new businesses. An additional 14 million people were estimated to be running established businesses."
  • "36% of U.S. entrepreneurs operate in the business service sector, which is generally associated with knowledge and service-based businesses."
  • "15% of entrepreneurs state that 25% or more of their customers come from outside the United States. This shows an increase over 11% reported in 2013, but it is still lower than 21% reported, on average, in the other innovation-driven economies."
  • "29% of Americans personally know an entrepreneur; this measure has generally followed a downward path since 2001, when 43% indicated this affiliation."
  • "Women’s entrepreneurship in the United States exhibits among the highest rates (11%) in the developed world."
  • "The United States shows the highest rate of entrepreneurship among 55-64 year olds (11%) across the 29 developed economies surveyed by GEM in 2014."
  • "20% of entrepreneurs aged 18-34 currently employ six or more people. 58% of 18-24 year olds and 46% of 25-34 year olds project six or more employees in five years. Among both younger age groups, 75% use the internet in their businesses."

At Belmont University, we have quite a number of entrepreneurial students, and I think the statistics show that entrepreneurship is a critical piece of our economy.

On the legal scholarship side, Gordon Smith (BYU Law) and others have been building the Law & Entrepreneurship field. The field continues to grow, and I hope to make it to the annual meeting of the Law and Entrepreneurship Association at some point soon.

On the legal education side, there is now a Law & Entrepreneurship LLM at Duke, and the number of related programs is growing. My colleague Mark Phillips is one of the academics advocating for the teaching of entrepreneurial skills to law students, and he shows that those entrepreneurial skills are useful to lawyers at law firms of all sizes.

September 4, 2015 in Business School, Entrepreneurship, Haskell Murray, Research/Scholarhip | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 28, 2015

Planet Fitness: Business Plan and IPO

Back in January, I joined Planet Fitness. The $10/month membership seemed too good to be true. Most gyms I had joined in the past had cost 3-5X that amount, and the equipment looked pretty similar. Also, the advertisement of No Commitment* Join Now & Save! (small font – *Commitments may vary per location) gave me pause.

Like a good lawyer, I read all the fine print in the membership contract, looking for a catch. There wasn’t really a catch – except for a small, one-time annual fee (~$30), if I did not cancel before October.

I signed up, enjoyed the gym, and canceled a few months later, as soon as the weather outside improved. (When I exercise, which is not as consistently as some of my co-bloggers, it is mostly just running, and I prefer to run outside if the weather is decent).

So, in total, I paid around $30 for three months of access to a single location of a decent gym.

This deal is still somewhat puzzling to me. If Planet Fitness’ business model makes sense, why aren’t more competitors coming close to the $10/month price point?

Here are some of my guesses (based on my brief experience at one location and pure speculation):

  • Planet Fitness may have a lower cost structure than some gyms. While I thought the equipment was fine, most of the equipment seemed to be of the “no frills variety.” For example, none of the treadmills at my location had color screens and most of the machines appeared to be base models. I did, however, appreciate that Planet Fitness seemed to pay attention to what machines members use regularly – like treadmills, bikes, and ellipticals –  and devoted most of their space to those machines.
  • Planet Fitness may be taking a page from the behavioral economist’s playbook. Planet Fitness made signing up extremely easy and automatically deducted the fee from the member's checking account each month. Canceling was slightly more difficult. You had to physically come into the gym to sign cancellation paperwork, or you could snail mail your cancellation. You also had to give a bit of notice, prior to cancellation, to avoid getting charged for the following month.  The slight difficulty canceling, coupled with the very low monthly fee might result in some folks forgetting about their membership for a while, simply taking a while to cancel, or purposefully avoid canceling, in hopes they would return to working out. I will say that I did not find canceling at Planet Fitness terribly difficult. However, when I was a member of LA Fitness a number of years ago, I remember their cancellation process, through certified “snail-mail” letter, being a pain. 
  • Planet Fitness may have been offering $10/month as a "teaser rate" to attract members, with plans to increase rates once members had developed habits of going to their gyms.  My gym has already increased the “no commitment” membership to $15/month, while the $10/month membership now comes with a 1-year commitment.
  • Judging from these complaints, many members may not understand the annual fee, the commitments (on some plans), and the cancellation requirements. Perhaps these parts of the contracts are helping off-set the low monthly price.
  • Planet Fitness may have been trying to increase their membership numbers in advance of their IPO this summer.

This last bullet-point, regarding increasing membership numbers to help their IPO, is the one I find most interesting. If the valuation of certain tech-companies, like Instagram, can be based on, at least in part, “number of users,” I think it is reasonable to assume that “number of members” is an important metric for the valuation of gyms.

On August 5, The Wall Street Journal reported that Planet Fitness priced its IPO at $16/share and raised $216 million. Planet Fitness disappointed in early trading (See here and here), then rose to just under $20/share, and is now back around its IPO price. Given the prevalence of IPO under-pricing, I imagine early investors hoped for better. That said, I plan to follow Planet Fitness and see if their business model is one that works in the long-term. If they have continued success, I imagine other companies will attempt to imitate. 

Update: Will Foster (Arkansas) passed along this interesting public radio podcast on gym memberships, which discusses Planet Fitness. Basically, it suggests that many gyms seek members who will not show up regularly (or at all). Maybe this is a key to Planet Fitness' business model; Planet Fitness advertises itself as a "no judgment" gym and even has a "lunk alarm" that it rings on weightlifters who grunt or drop weights. Members seeking "no judgment" may come to the gym much less frequently than serious weightlifters. In fact, at the Planet Fitness featured, 50% never even showed up once. That location has ~6000 members, but a capacity of ~300. Also, this podcast makes sense of why Planet Fitness has free candy, bagels, mixers, massage chairs, and pizza parties - again this attracts less serious gym members and it also gives some value to those who come to the gym only to socialize and eat. Listen to the whole thing. 

August 28, 2015 in Business Associations, Corporate Finance, Corporations, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (3)

Thursday, August 27, 2015

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Hiring in Business and Tax Law

As mentioned in my post about law schools hiring in business law areas, we received the following posting from The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law.


University of Utah Hiring in Business and Tax Law

The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of associate professor beginning academic year 2016-2017. Qualifications for the position include a record of excellence in academics, successful teaching experience or potential as a teacher, and strong scholarly distinction or promise. The College is particularly interested in candidates in the areas of business and tax law. Interested persons can submit an application to the University of Utah Human Resources website at (please note that the application requires a cover letter, CV, and list of references). Baiba Hicks, Administrative Assistant to the Faculty Appointments Committee ( or 801-581-5464) is available to answer questions.

The University of Utah is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and educator and its policies prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, religion, age, status as a person with a disability, or veteran’s status. Minorities, women, veterans, and those with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified veterans. To inquire further about the University’s nondiscrimination and affirmative action policies or to request a reasonable accommodation for a disability in the application process, please contact the following individual who has been designated as the University’s Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 South Presidents Circle, Rm. 135, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, (801)581-8365, email:

August 27, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 24, 2015

Belmont University (Massey College of Business) Professor Position - Healthcare Management/Health Law

Belmont University's Massey College of Business (my employer) has an open Assistant Professor of Management position that may interest some of our readers.

As stated below, a PHD in Management and/or a JD is required. Healthcare management expertise is strongly preferred. The recently retired professor whose line we are filling was a JD, MBA, RN with significant healthcare management and health law experience. I am not on the hiring committee, but am happy to discuss Belmont University in general, and I can point interested parties in the right direction.

The online application can be accessed here.


The College of Business Administration at Belmont University is seeking applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning August 2015.

The faculty member in this position will teach both graduate and undergraduate management classes. The area of specialization/certification that will be given preference for this position is healthcare management. Ability and willingness to teach healthcare law, patient-centered care, business law, principles of management, and/or strategic management is preferred. Clinical experience or familiarity with the clinical setting will be looked upon quite favorably, as well.  Candidates should be able to demonstrate a well-developed research agenda with promise of publishing in high quality, peer reviewed management or business law journals.

An interest and/or experience in engaging students in undergraduate research will be considered favorably, as will teaching experience at the university level.  Completion of a Ph.D. in management from an AACSB or CAHME accredited/AUPHA member institution by the time of employment is required. A Doctorate of Jurisprudence (JD) is also acceptable.  Belmont University is particularly seeking applicants who can demonstrate the interest and ability to work collaboratively in course design and to teach interdisciplinary and topical courses in this program. 

Belmont University seeks to attract and retain highly qualified faculty and staff that share the University’s values and will contribute to its mission and vision to be a leader among teaching universities bringing together the best of liberal arts and professional education in a Christian community of learning and service. For additional information about the position and to complete the online application, candidates are directed to During the application process, applicants will be asked to respond to Belmont’s mission, vision, and values statements, articulating how the candidate’s knowledge, experience, and beliefs have prepared him/her to contribute to a Christian community of learning and service and give a brief statement of teaching philosophy. An electronic version of a Cover Letter, Curriculum Vitae, List of References, Teaching Philosophy, and a Response to Belmont’s Mission, Vision, and Values must be attached in order to complete the online application.  Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.

A comprehensive, coeducational university located in Nashville, Tennessee, Belmont is among the fastest growing Christian universities in the nation. Ranked No. 5 in the Regional Universities South category and named for the seventh consecutive year as one of the top “Up-and-Comer” universities by U.S. News & World Report, Belmont University consists of approximately 7,300 students who come from every state and 25 countries. The university’s purpose is to help students explore their passions and develop their talents to meet the world’s needs. With more than 75 areas of study, 20 master’s programs and four doctoral degrees, there is no limit to the ways Belmont University can expand an individual's horizon.

Belmont University is an equal opportunity employer committed to fostering a diverse learning community of committed Christians from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The selected candidate for this position will be required to complete a background check satisfactory to the University. 

August 24, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 21, 2015

Interview with CJ Leo Strine and the Nabors Case

In this interview, Delaware Supreme Court Chief Justice Leo Strine singles out C & J Energy Services, Inc. v. City of Miami General Employees’ ("Nabors"), 107 A.3d 1049 (2014) as, perhaps, the most important opinion he has authored as CJ.

Given such an endorsement, I took time to read the case yesterday. The following paragraphs get to the heart of the case, which overturned the Delaware Court of Chancery's mandate to shop the company at issue.

Revlon does not require a board to set aside its own view of what is best for the corporation’s stockholders and run an auction whenever the board approves a change of control transaction. As this Court has made clear, “there is no single blueprint that a board must follow to fulfill its duties,” and a court applying Revlon ‘s enhanced scrutiny must decide “whether the directors made a reasonable decision, not a perfect decision.”


In a series of decisions in the wake of Revlon, Chancellor Allen correctly read its holding as permitting a board to pursue the transaction it reasonably views as most valuable to stockholders, so long as the transaction is subject to an effective market check under circumstances in which any bidder interested in paying more has a reasonable opportunity to do so. Such a market check does not have to involve an active solicitation, so long as interested bidders have a fair opportunity to present a higher-value alternative, and the board has the flexibility to eschew the original transaction and accept the higher-value deal. The ability of the stockholders themselves to freely accept or reject the board’s preferred course of action is also of great importance in this context.


pgs. 1067-68.

August 21, 2015 in Delaware, Haskell Murray, M&A | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 14, 2015

ALSB Promotion and Tenure News

An Academy of Legal Studies in Business (“ALSB”) colleague suggested I do a post listing recent promotion and tenure news for fellow legal studies professors. I think that this is a worthy thing to celebrate on the blog.

Below I have listed the recent P&T news sent to me by ALSB listserv members. I may update this list as I receive more news. Congrats all! 

Brian Halsey (West Chester) – promoted to Professor and appointed as Director of the MBA Program

Henry Lowenstein (Coastal Carolina) – awarded the William J. Baxley, Jr. Applied Business Endowed Professorship for 2015-16

Joshua Perry (Indiana) – promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure and awarded the endowed W. Michael & William D. Wells Life Sciences Faculty Fellowship

Denise Smith (Eastern Illinois) – promoted to Professor

Nancy White (Central Michigan) – named Chair of the Finance and Law Department

Eric Yordy (Northern Arizona) – promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure

August 14, 2015 in Business School, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (2)

Friday, August 7, 2015

Maternity and Paternity Leave at Netflix

The internet has been abuzz this week with news that Netflix will now offer of "unlimited" maternity and paternity leave to its employees.

I place "unlimited" in scare quotes because, while Netflix uses that word, the announcement makes clear that the leave is unlimited....during the first year after a child's birth or adoption.

Nonetheless, one year of paid maternity/paternity leave is extremely generous by U.S. company standards. 

Amid the praise, there has been a fair bit of skepticism. 

No good deed goes unpunished? As far as I could tell, the criticism boils down to the following:

  • Netflix (and other companies) may not be able to afford this massive benefit
  • The policy does not cover all Netflix employees
  • The policy may lead to jealousy and strained working relationships
  • Parents will have a hard time separating from their children after one year
  • Employees might actually take less time off, as seen with some of the unlimited vacation policies

The skepticism following Netflix's announcement reminds me of the somewhat surprising blowback from Gravity Payment's decision to raise its minimum salary to $70,000. More details on the Gravity Payment's situation are nicely detailed by our friend Christine Hurt (BYU Law) at The Conglomerate. Decisions by both companies appear to warrant business judgment rule protection, even if they turn out badly. 

While the reactions have been mixed, Netflix has definitely been getting a lot of publicity. Perhaps the publicity will breathe new life into efforts to have the U.S. join the rest of the industrialize world in requiring paid maternity/paternity leave.

In any event, it will be interesting to see how Netflix's policy plays out. To date, the stock market seems to be supporting the announcement (or at least fairly neutral on the announcement). If support continues, perhaps we will see this type of policy spread organically.

August 7, 2015 in CSR, Current Affairs, Employment Law, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (0)

The University of South Carolina School of Law - Professor Positions

From an e-mail I received earlier today:


University of South Carolina School of Law

Hiring Advertisement

The University of South Carolina School of Law invites applications for tenured, tenure-track, or visiting faculty positions to begin fall semester 2016. Candidates should have a juris doctorate or equivalent degree. Additionally, a successful applicant should have a record of excellence in academia or in practice, the potential to be an outstanding teacher, and demonstrable scholarly promise.  Although the School of Law is especially interested in candidates who are qualified to teach in the areas of taxation, clinical legal education, environmental law and small business, we are equally interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity of our law school community whose teaching interests may fall outside of these areas. 

Interested persons should send a resume, references, and subject area preferences to Prof. Eboni Nelson, Chair, Faculty Selection Committee, c/o Kim Fanning, University of South Carolina School of Law, 701 S. Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 or, by email, to HIRE2016@LAW.SC.EDU (electronic The University of South Carolina is committed to a diverse faculty, staff, and student body.  We encourage applications from women, minorities, persons with disabilities, and others whose background, experience, and viewpoints contribute to the diversity of our institution. The University of South Carolina is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the base of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, sexual orientation, gender, or veteran status.

August 7, 2015 in Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Law Schools Hiring in Business Areas 2015-16

Earlier I posted a list of business schools hiring in legal studies.

This post includes a list of law schools that have listed business law as an area of interest.* I will use the PrawfsBlawg spreadsheet and other sources to update this list from time to time.

Feel free to send me any additions or leave additions in the comments.   

Updated Sept. 30, 2015

*Schools that have not listed any preferences, or that have provided open-ended language after preferences that do not include business law, are not included in this list. Also, given that I do not have access to the AALS ads, this list is likely incomplete and only includes schools that have posted their open positions online.  

For the purposes of this post, I include the following subject areas in the definition of "business law": banking; business associations; corporate finance; corporate governance; financial institutions; international business transactions; law & economics; law & entrepreneurship; M&A; securities regulation; unincorporated entities .

August 7, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

In Memoriam: Judge A. Harris Adams

Harris Adams

Judge A. Harris Adams (Georgia Court of Appeals 2002-2012) died on Monday night at age 67. According to the Daily Report: "Visitation is planned for 5-7 p.m. Thursday at Mayes Ward-Dobbins Funeral Home, 180 Church St., Marietta. Funeral services are scheduled for 10:30 a.m. Friday at the Church of the Apostles in Atlanta."

Until my family moved after my eighth grade year, I lived just a few blocks from Judge Adams, his wife (who was one of my mother's dearest friends), and his three children in Marietta, GA. His oldest child, Lanier, attempted to teach me piano, and his youngest, Zach, was a childhood friend of mine.

Judge Adams had an infectious laugh. He was a talented storyteller. He was bright and well-respected, but stayed humble and never seemed to take himself too seriously. I have some vivid memories of him shooting baskets with Zach and me, in his dress clothes. He will be missed by many. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family.   

August 5, 2015 in Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (1)

The University of Maryland School of Law - Professor Opening

I received this position posting today via e-mail (emphasis added):


The University of Maryland School of Law invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position to teach in the area of business law, potentially including an appropriate combination of the following courses: Business Associations, Corporate Finance, Secured Transactions, along with other core classes in the business curriculum.  We will consider both entry level and lateral candidates.  The University of Maryland has a strong commitment to diversity.  We welcome applications from persons of color, women, and other members of historically disadvantaged groups.  Contact: Professor Leigh Goodmark, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, 500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.  Email:  Phone: (410) 706-3549.

The University of Maryland, Baltimore is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

August 5, 2015 in Business Associations, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)