Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Word of the Day

Mark Giagrandi, one of the Research Librarians at DePaul University College of Law, brought to our attention a blog post by The Atlantic's Alex Madrigal on "15 New Words From the 1927 Webster's International Dictionary."  What was one of the words?

airplane, n: A form of aircraft, heavier than air, which is driven through the air by a screw propeller, and which obtains support by the dynamic reaction of the air against the wings.Airplane is commonly used to designate airplanes with landing gear suited to operation from the land. If the landing gear is suited to operation from the water, the specific term seaplane is generally used. Cf. SEAPLANE, below. Airplanes are classified as monoplanes, biplanes, triplanes, quadruplanes, or multiplanes, according to the number of parts into which their main supporting surface is divided. The form airplane has been officially adopted by the United States Army and Navy, Bureau of Standards, etc.; aƫroplane is still generally used by British writers.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/aviation/2011/06/word-of-the-day.html

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