Friday, May 16, 2014

National High School Mock Trial Competition

Last week I posted about Savannah High School’s moot court reenactment of the Brown v. Board case.  After participating in that event as a judge, I became curious about whether other high schools participated in appellate advocacy training.  Of course, high school debate and mock trial are pretty common, but I had not yet seen any high school programs that focused on appellate advocacy. 

In my research, I came to discover that American University Washington College of Law hosts an annual high school moot court competition.  In preparation for competition, high school students study a problem comprised of judicial opinions, the party briefs, case law, and articles.  Over the course of two days in the Spring, students present oral arguments on the issues presented by the moot court problem.  The competition is open to all students, even those who are home schooled, and there is no requirement of prior experience with moot court or mock trial.

This type of program is positioned to impart a number of skills upon the students.  Aside from the obvious ones like poise and public speaking, the studying of cases and defending a position through oral expository argument engages the brain in sophisticated problem-solving thought processes.  Furthermore, asking young students to contemplate social justice issues and policy concerns in the context of legal precedent creates opportunities to ignite passion for the law and respect for its power. 

I know many attorneys and academics seek opportunities to give back to their communities.  Partnering with a high school to train students for appellate advocacy is an excellent way to give back by passing along attorney-specific knowledge to a younger generation.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/appellate_advocacy/2014/05/national-high-school-mock-trial-competition.html

Appellate Advocacy, Legal Profession, Moot Court, Oral Argument | Permalink

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