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Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Lessons Since The Reagan Revolution at the FTC: A 30-Year Perspective on Competition and Consumer Policies

Posted by D. Daniel Sokol

Lessons Since The Reagan Revolution at the FTC: A 30-Year Perspective on Competition and Consumer Policies

Law & Economics Center, George Mason University School of Law

Friday, September 30, 2011, George Mason University School of Public Policy, Arlington, VA

The Henry G. Manne Program in Law & Economics presents at the First Annual Manne Law & Economics Conference on Lessons Since the Reagan Revolution at the FTC: A 30-Year Perspective on Competition and Consumer Policies to be held at George Mason University School of Public Policy, Friday, September 30th, 2011. The conference will run from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

OVERVIEW: By the late 1970's, the Federal Trade Commission had greatly expanded in size and scope of its powers. The Commission's size, lack of focus, and overreach of its regulatory mandate drew the ire of parents, business leaders, and members of Congress. No less than The Washington Post opined that the FTC was a "National Nanny." In 1981, President Ronald Reagan appointed James C. Miller III as Chairman of the FTC. Miller was the first Ph.D. Economist to serve as Commissioner. Under Chairman Miller's leadership, the FTC was reformed in a number of ways. Miller cut the Commission's budget and set a new direction involving more private initiative and self-regulation by industry as well as providing more information to consumers to enable them to make their own decisions. He lessened government intervention in the marketplace and was committed to integrating economic analysis into the development of investigations, prosecutions, and justifications of remedies. Miller asserted that our system of competition combined with laws that proscribe only economically inefficient transactions "affects not only our economic well-being, but our basic liberties."

Stephen Calkins, a leading antitrust scholar and former FTC official, writes "The great thing about Jim Miller, for the FTC, was that he cared about and was committed to the institution, and it showed." Now, as the FTC once more gains expanded authority and broad new powers for consumer protection and antitrust enforcement, and moves to regulate online privacy, continued discussion of Miller's reforms is more important than ever. This conference will reexamine the important changes implemented in the early 80's, evaluate their lasting impact, and consider the insights gained for current and future FTC practices and policies. The conference proceedings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal or an edited volume.

This conference is organized by Henry N. Butler, Executive Director of the Law & Economics Center and George Mason Foundation Professor of Law at George Mason University School of Law, and Joshua D. Wright, Professor of Law at George Mason University School of Law.

AGENDA (as of July 27, 2011):

Friday, September 30, 2011

8:00 Welcome:
- Henry N. Butler, Executive Director, Law & Economics Center
- Daniel Polsby, Dean, George Mason University School of Law

8:05 to 8:20 Opening Remarks:
- James C. Miller III

8:20 to 9:15 Panel Discussion: Politics and Policy in 1981
Panelists:
- Timothy J. Muris, George Mason University School of Law
- Sidney M. Milkis, University of Virginia
- Bruce Yandle
- William Baer, Arnold & Porter

Moderator:
- Carol T. Crawford

9:30 to 10:45 Consumer Protection: The Demise and Return (?) of the "Nanny State"
Papers:
- Howard Beales, George Washington University
- Fred S. McChesney, University of Miami
- Paul Rubin, Emory University

Discussants:
- Paul Paulter, FTC
- Jodie Z. Bernstein, KelleyDrye

Moderator:
- William MacLeod, KelleyDrye

11:00 to 12:15 Competition Policy and Section 5
Papers:
- David Scheffman, Berkeley Research Group
- Joshua D. Wright, George Mason University School of Law

Discussants:
- Kathryn M. Fenton, Jones Day
- Douglas Melamed, Intel

Moderator:
- TBD

12:30 to 2:00 Keynote Luncheon Address:
The Future of FTC Jurisdiction over Antitrust and Consumer Protection
- William E. Kovacic, FTC

Moderator:
- David Hyman, University of Illinois

2:15 to 3:30 Economic Policy in Enforcement, Research and Development

Papers:
- Robert D. Tollison, Clemson University
- Luke Froeb, Vanderbilt (I)

Discussants:
- Maureen Ohlhausen, Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP
- Jonathan Baker, American University
- James Cooper, FTC

Moderator:
- Bruce Kobayashi, George Mason University School of Law

3:45 to 4:45 Panel Discussion: Lessons for Setting Priorities in 2011

- William E. Kovacic, FTC and George Washington University
- Robert Pitofsky, Georgetown University
- J. Thomas Rosch, FTC

Moderator:
- Deboarh Majoras, The Procter & Gamble Company

4:45 Closing Remarks: James C. Miller III

5:00 Reception

REGISTRATION: Attendance for this conference is by invitation only. To receive an invitation, please send a message with your name, affiliation, and full contact information to Jeff Smith: jsmithQ@gmu.edu

VENUE:
George Mason University School of Public Policy
3551 Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22201

FURTHER INFORMATION: For more information regarding this conference or other initiatives of the Law & Economics Center, please visit: http://www.MasonLEC.org or call or send an email to (703) 993-8040, lec@gmu.edu

The Henry G. Manne Program in Law & Economics honors the legacy of Henry G. Manne, Dean Emeritus of George Mason Law School and founder of the Law & Economics Center. Manne was a trailblazer in the development of law and economics, not only as a prominent and influential scholar, but also as an academic entrepreneur. He spurred the development of law and economics into the most influential area of legal scholarship through his Economics Institutes for Law Professors and Law Institutes for Economics Professors. The Manne Program promotes law-and-economics scholarship by funding faculty research and hosting research roundtables and academic conferences.


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Comments

The great thing about Jim Miller, for the FTC, was that he cared about and was committed to the institution, and it showed.

Posted by: Overland Park dui lawyer | Aug 23, 2011 4:26:01 PM

FAIR AND BALANCED AGENDA!

Posted by: Fox News | Oct 1, 2011 8:47:25 PM

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