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Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Defining the 'Business of Baseball' - A Proposed Framework for Determining the Scope of Professional Baseball's Antitrust Exemption

Posted by D. Daniel Sokol

Nathaniel Grow,  University of Georgia - Department of Insurance, Legal Studies, Real Estate has a paper on Defining the 'Business of Baseball' - A Proposed Framework for Determining the Scope of Professional Baseball's Antitrust Exemption.

ABSTRACT: This article analyzes the scope of professional baseball’s antitrust exemption. Specifically, the article finds that lower courts have applied the exemption in widely divergent ways, due to a misunderstanding, and in some cases a misinterpretation, of the underlying focus of the United States Supreme Court’s opinions first creating and affirming the exemption. The article argues that future courts should reject the existing lower court precedent, and instead, consistent with the focus of the Supreme Court’s decisions, hold that the baseball exemption protects only those activities directly related to the business of providing baseball entertainment to the public.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/antitrustprof_blog/2010/01/defining-the-business-of-baseball-a-proposed-framework-for-determining-the-scope-of-professional-bas.html

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Comments

The tactical decision that precedes almost every play in a baseball game involves pitch selection. Among the wide variety of pitches that may be thrown, the four basic types are the fastball, the changeup (or off-speed pitch), and two breaking balls—the curveball and the slider.Pitchers have different repertoires of pitches they are skillful at throwing. Conventionally, before each pitch, the catcher signals the pitcher what type of pitch to throw, as well as its general vertical and/or horizontal location.If there is disagreement on the selection, the pitcher may shake off the sign and the catcher will call for a different pitch. With a runner on base and taking a lead, the pitcher may attempt a pickoff, a quick throw to a fielder covering the base to keep the runner's lead in check or, optimally, effect a tag out. If an attempted stolen base is anticipated, the catcher may call for a pitchout, a ball thrown deliberately off the plate, allowing the catcher to catch it while standing and throw quickly to a base.Facing a batter with a strong tendency to hit to one side of the field, the fielding team may employ a shift, with most or all of the fielders moving to the left or right of their usual positions. With a runner on third base, the infielders may play in, moving closer to home plate to improve the odds of throwing out the runner on a ground ball, though a sharply hit grounder is more likely to carry through a drawn-in infield.

Posted by: buy viagra | Jan 21, 2010 2:43:47 PM

Is there actually a business?

Posted by: Weight Loss Tips | Jun 15, 2010 8:48:17 AM

Don't think it is really a business, just as long as the fans are there.

Posted by: Magnetic Generator | Jan 4, 2011 1:51:48 AM

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