Adjunct Law Prof Blog

Editor: Mitchell H. Rubinstein
New York Law School

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Friday, May 9, 2014

Wikipedia as Legal Authority

If you are wondering whether or not it is a good idea to cite Wikipedia in an appellate brief, this Above the Law post on the subject might be as good a starting place as any.

Craig Estlinbaum

May 9, 2014 in Legal Research, Procedure, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Texas: Facebook "Friendship" Alone Does Not Require Recusal

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals of Texas, located in Dallas, held last week that a trial judge's undisclosed Facebook  "friendship" with the victim's father in a criminal prosecution alone does not establish grounds for recusal or disqualification.  Youkers v. State of Texas, No. 05-11-01407-CR (Tex. App. -- Dallas, May 15, 2013). 

Defendant in the case pled guilty to assault of his pregnant girlfriend and received a 10-year sentence suspended for 5-years plus a $500 fine.  Three months, later, the State filed a motion to revoke.  Defendant entered an open plea of true to the motion's allegations at the revocation hearing.   The trial judge sentenced Defendant to eight-years in the state penitentary and later denied the motion for new trial.  The Defedant argued on appeal that he was entitled to the new hearing because the judge and the victim's father were undisclosed Facebook "friends" and that the judge had received an improper ex parte message (one favorable to the Defendant) via Facebook from the victim's father prior to sentencing.

The court analyzed the case facts, applicable canons, and further applied the recent ABA Standing Comm. on Ethics & Prof. Responsibity, Formal Op. 462 (February 21, 2013) (authorizing judges to participate in social networking providing such participation complies with relevant ethics rules).  The appellate court also examined other Texas cases involving cases where judges presided in cases where the judge had a seemingly close, public relationship with a party.  For example, in Lueg v. Lueg, 976 S.W.2d 308, 311 (Tex. App--Corpus Christi 1998, pet denied), cited by the Dallas court, another intermediate appellate court held that the mere fact that a party was a former campaign manager for the judge alone was insufficient to require the judge's recusal.  The court rejected Defendant's claim of actual and apparent impartiality on the record and affirmed that ground.

Not all states agree with the approach taken by the ABA (and this Texas court) on judges using social media.  Last September, for example, the Florida appeals court held that a judge's Facebook friendship alone presents grounds for disqualification.  Domville v. State of Florida, 103 So.3d 184 (Fla.Cir. Ct. 2012) (covered by this blog here).  Florida's state judicial ethics commission had previously rendered an opinion applying a restrictive approach to social media use for judges - a different approach than the one adopted by the ABA.

The permissive approach to judicial social media use adopted by the ABA and this Texas Court requires fact-intensive analysis into the relationship between the judge and the social media friend in recusal and disqualification issues.  For this reason this issue now of first impression is one likely to be revisited frequently in states applying the ABA's permissive guidelines as more judges enter the social networking world.

Craig Estlinbaum

May 23, 2013 in Ethics, Interesting Cases, Judges, Recent Developments, Texas Law, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)