Adjunct Law Prof Blog

Editor: Mitchell H. Rubinstein
New York Law School

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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Lander on Adjuncts

David Lander, an adjunct professor at St. Louis, is guest-blogging at The Faculty Lounge.  So far he has posted, in order of publication:

I have two initial responses:

Lander writes in the first post, "And if a school is looking for a quick way to cut a few thousand dollars from its expense budget, reduction in the number of adjuncts may seem a handy way to find that reduction while asking "underutilized" tenured faculty to teach the courses the adjuncts had been teaching."

This is true, but aren't greater saving realized by not hiring a tenure track professor and using two adjuncts to teach elective classes otherwise being taught by full-time staff, leaving required and bar classes for the the full-timers?  At many adjunct pay scales, this approach would hold greater appeal to the bottom line.

Lander writes in his second post, "One very important concern is the effect of the dependence on adjuncts on scholarship and publications. Although many adjuncts do write articles, nearly all of the true legal scholarship is done by full-time faculty and very little is done by adjuncts. This lack of scholarship has many negative implications...Research and publications will suffer in any area where full time faculty is replaced by adjuncts. Areas which make major use of adjuncts such as trial practice, bankruptcy, and sports and entertainment law have probably reached a tipping point where the amount and quality of research is significantly affected by the mix of adjuncts and full-time faculty working in these fields."

I would certainly agree that in the law school arena adjuncts on the whole are less productive scholars than are full-time professors on the whole, if journal articles and books measure "true legal scholarship."  The question, though, is this: How many fully tenured professors are no longer productive scholars (and here)?  It seems unfair to criticize adjuncts for not contributing scholarship when tenured professors - those best situated to make scholarly contributions - do not themselves write.

I am looking forward to more from Mr. Lander during his time at The Faculty Lounge.

Craig Estlinbaum

October 22, 2014 in Adjunct Information in General, Law Professors, Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 25, 2014

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review Goes Green

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review announces its transition to online publication here.  I would expect more law reviews will make this move as law schools look for cost savings.

Craig Estlinbaum

July 25, 2014 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Key State Committee Rejects Proposed Charleston Law School Sale

The Committee on Academic Affairs and Licensing for South Carolina on Monday voted against the proposed sale of Charleston Law School to InfiLaw, a private, for-profit education concern.  The final up-or-down vote will be made later by the state's Commission on Higher Education.  The commission will consider the committee's decision in that final vote.

More on this development can be found here and here.   Paul Caron at TaxProfBlog has been following the proposed sale closely as well.

Craig Estlinbaum

May 21, 2014 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 21, 2014

Job Market For Recent Law School Grads Improves-Alittle

Job Figures Show Improvement for New York Law Schools is an interesting April 18, 2014 NYLJ article
Read more: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202651533889/Job-Figures-Show-Improvement-for-New-York-Law-Schools#ixzz2zXIRFu6O

As the article explains:

Members of the Class of 2013 from New York's 15 law schools are faring slightly better than their predecessors in finding jobs, and also better than their counterparts nationwide, according to entry-level employment data released last week by the American Bar Association.

The small boost came even though the nation's law schools graduated their largest class ever.

For the 5,009 graduates of New York's schools, 62.9 percent had found full-time, permanent jobs requiring bar passage as of Feb. 15, roughly a 3 percentage-point increase over last year. Nationwide, the 57 percent who secured such jobs was not much higher than 2012's 56.2 percent.


Mitchell H. Rubinstein

April 21, 2014 in Law Schools, Law Students | Permalink | Comments (3)

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Brooklyn Law School Cuts Tuition

Yes, it's true and it is by 15%. Story here.  Brooklyn is not alone. As CNN reports:

A handful of other schools have cut tuition as well. The most prestigious school in this group is the University of Iowa, which reduced tuition by 16.4%. Others include the University of Arizona (11% in-state, 8% out-of-state) and Roger Williams University (18%). A few schools have really gone all out: Penn State cut tuition by nearly 50% for in-state students in the class of 2014, and the University of La Verne reduced tuition from $39,500 to $25,000 and completely did away with merit aid. (It's worth mentioning that the American Bar Association revoked La Verne's provisional accreditation in 2011; the school has since earned it back.)

Mitchell H. Rubinstein

April 16, 2014 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Attorneys and Depression

Brian Clarke (Charlotte) has written an extremely important and ultimately courageous post, "Law Professors, Law Students and Depression . . . A Story of Coming Out (Part 1)" at The Faculty Lounge on depression and anxiety's alarming incidence among attorneys.  Clarke relates some truly disturbing statistics on depression and suicide in the legal profession (emphasis in original):

Lawyers, as a group, are 3.6 times more likely to suffer from depression than the average person. Of 104 occupations, lawyers were the most likely to suffer depression.  (Both of these statistics are from a Johns Hopkins University study to which I cannot find a link). 

Further, according to a two-year study completed in 1997, suicide accounted for 10.8% of all deaths among lawyers in the United States and Canada and was the third leading cause of death.  Of more importance was the suicide rate among lawyers, which was 69.3 suicide deaths per 100,000 individuals, as compared to 10 to 14 suicide deaths per 100,000 individuals in the general population.  In short, the rate of death by suicide for lawyers was nearly six times the suicide rate in the general population. 

Clarke continues along this vein and introduces his own story fighting mental illness in this first in a three-part series on the subject. 

Some states have added a mental health component to the continuing legal education requirements, and many state bar associations have established hotlines and resources for attorneys battling mental illness.  The Texas Lawyers Assistance Program serves this latter function in Texas -- the Program's 24-hour hotline number is 1-800-343-8527. 

Craig Estlinbaum

April 1, 2014 in Blogs, Faculty, Ethics, Law Schools, Law Students, Lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Cleveland-Marshall: Master of Legal Studies Degree

Karen Sloan, National Law Journal, reports that Cleveland-Marshall will, "allow students who complete one year of studies but don't want to continue their l.egal educations to receive a master of legal studies degree." HT: Above the Law.

Craig Estlinbaum

March 19, 2014 in Law Schools, Law Schools, News, Law Students | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Charleston Law School Sale Under Legislative Scruitiny

A proposed sale of the Charleston (SC) Law School to a Florida-based company has captured the state legislature's attention, and it appears some there may have other plans for the stand alone law school. 

Some powerful S.C. lawmakers are trying to stop the sale of the Charleston School of Law to a Florida-based company to clear the way for it to merge with a state-supported school, a move that would give South Carolina two publicly funded law schools.

But other lawmakers say South Carolina already struggles to sustain the state’s 33 publicly funded colleges, universities and technical schools, adding the state should not interfere with private business transactions.

Here is the full story from Adam Beam of thestate.com.  According to the story, some legislators proposed to merge the law school with the College of Charleston, a public university located in downtown Charleston. 

Craig Estlinbaum


Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2014/02/01/3240651/some-sc-lawmakers-trying-to-stop.html#storylink=cpy

February 12, 2014 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Law School Name Change in Fort Worth

The former Texas Wesleyan School of Law opened this Fall semester as the Texas A&M University School of Law.  Earlier this year, the Texas A&M System purchased the Texas Wesleyan School of Law for $73 million.  Clay Falls at KBTX.com has a story with video on the transition.

Craig Estlinbaum

September 24, 2013 in Law Schools, Misc., Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 22, 2013

New York State’s Student Internship Program Offers Hundreds Of Internships

Source: New York State Department of Civil Service
Civil Service Commissioner Jerry Boone recently announced that New York State has hundreds of internships available, and reminded college students to apply for Fall semester internships before the application deadline on September 3, 2013.
New York State created a one-stop website athttp://nysinternships.com/nnyl/ that allows students to view and apply for internship opportunities across an array of state agencies both downstate and upstate.
The website is one component of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’sNew New York Leaders initiative, which is focused on attracting new talent to state government through both a fellowship program and an internship program.  With the internship website, applicants can view job descriptions, create profiles, specify interests, and upload resumes, writing samples and letters of recommendation.  Students can apply for multiple internships at the same time.
“The internship program is designed to attract and mentor a new generation of talented leaders for New York State,” said Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.  “I continue to encourage talented college students to consider devoting time to public service while acquiring valuable skills and marketable work experience.”
“New York State continues to offer a wide variety of opportunities across numerous professional occupations,” said Civil Service Commissioner Jerry Boone.  “Governor Cuomo’s internship program offers opportunities for hands on experience in finance, engineering, public relations, information technology and health care, as well as a host of other professional disciplines.”
The program is open to resident graduate and undergraduate students as well as students who attend schools in other states, but reside in New York.  Opportunities include both paid and unpaid positions.  Internships may include academic credit depending on the policy of the educational institution.
Reprinted with permission New York Public Personnel Law
Mitchell H. Rubinstein

August 22, 2013 in Colleges, Law Schools, Law Students | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, July 19, 2013

ABA Committee Proposes Change To Student-to-Faculty Ratio

The National Law Journal (Karen Sloan) reports the "ABA committee reviewing the organization’s accreditation standards has voted to do away with the rule establishing a minimum student-to-faculty ratio."  Current standards require a 30-1 ratio while stating a 20-1 ratio is ideal.  The article also addresses other proposals before the committee, including proposals to change current tenure practices and to require law schools to meet higher bar passage rates.

Craig Estlinbaum

July 19, 2013 in Bar Association Matters, Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Class Size Reduction at McGeorge

The Sacramento Bee (Mark Glover) reports this morning that the University of Pacific McGeorge School of Law will cut its enrollment from over 1,000 students in Fall 2010 to 600 students over the next three years in response to declines in applications.  The story is here.

Craig Estlinbaum

July 10, 2013 in Law Schools, News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 10, 2013

"An Existential Threat"

Rutgers-Camden School of Law enrolled 282 first-year students in 2011.  In 2012, the school only enrolled 116.  A recession in the legal employment market and a failed merger receives the blame.  The Philadelphia Business Journal's Jeff Blumenthal has the full story.

Craig Estlinbaum

June 10, 2013 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Seto on JD Job Prospects, etc.

Theodore P. Seto (Loyola-L.A.) has a blog post at TaxProf Blog on job prospects for near-term J.D. graduates and Dan Filler at The Faculty Lounge added comments of his own.

Craig Estlinbaum

June 5, 2013 in Blogs, Faculty, Law Schools, Lawyer Employment | Permalink | Comments (0)

Best and Worst Places to Look For A Law Job

Jordan Weissmann at The Atlantic has posted an article that purports to reveal the best and place regions and states to look for a law job, measured by law graduates per job opening.  According to the study, the best region to look for a law job is the Rocky Mountain states; the worst is New England, followed closely by the Great Lakes region.  The worst state to look for a job is Mississippi, with over 10 graduates per opening.  The best? -- Alaska, the only state with no law school.

Craig Estlinbaum

June 5, 2013 in Current Affairs, Law Schools, Lawyer Employment | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 3, 2013

Law School Applications Decline Again

From Catherine Ho, Washington Post:

The number of people applying to U.S. law schools dropped nationwide for the third year in a row, prompting some law schools to slash the size of their entering classes.

As of May 17, about 55,760 people had applied to American Bar Association-accredited law schools for the 2013-14 school year — down 13.4 percent from 2012, according to data compiled by the Law School Admission Council.

The story goes on to describe cuts in applications or enrollment at Georgetown, George Washington and other schools.

Craig Estlinbaum

June 3, 2013 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 31, 2013

New Law School In the Works for Tacoma

According to this Tacoma-Seattle report by Kathleen Cooper, a "12-person steering committee working on [a] plan" to bring a new law school to Tacoma, Washington, some 20 years after the University of Puget Sound sold its law school to Seattle University.  The committee is in its earliest "due diligence" stages according to the report and their are some substantial hurdles to admitting the first student, as the report explains.

Craig Estlinbaum


Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2013/05/25/2612035/group-hopes-to-bring-law-school.html#storylink=cpy"

May 31, 2013 in Law Schools, News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Bond Rating at Albany, Building for Sale at Louisiana College

From Scott Waldman, Albany Times-Union last week:

Colleges and universities spend a lot of resources ensuring enrollment does one of two things: stabilize or increase.

Albany Law School is headed in the wrong direction. The school's enrollment has dropped 14 percent in just two years.

The school now enrolls 617 students, down from 720 in the 2010-2011 academic year. That loss has caught the attention of the Standard & Poor's bond rating agency, which downgraded the school's outlook from positive to stable. Standard & Poor's said the situation at Albany Law reflected a national trend of law schools losing students and tuition income...  Full Story Here.

The article concludes by suggesting a "day of reckoning" may be at hand for an industry that has been focused on "relentless expansion." Well, that day of reckoning may already be visiting the Louisiana College's proposed Judge Paul Pressler School of Law that was announced in 2007 but has yet to admit a student.  Alexandria's Thetowntalk.com, a Gannett Co., reports today that the school has put the building it purchased to house the law school up for sale:

The Shreveport building Louisiana College purchased to be its law school in 2011 is now for sale.The former Joe D. Waggonner Federal Building, which was intended to house LC’s Judge Paul Pressler School of Law, is listed with Sealy Real Estate Services LLC in Shreveport.

The story does not address the proposed law school's future plans.  If opened, the law school would be the fifth in Louisiana, joining Tulane and Loyola in New Orleans and also LSU and Southern in Baton Rouge.  There is no law school in Lousiana's northern half.

Craig Estlinbaum

April 13, 2013 in Colleges, Law Schools, Law Schools, News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Rutgers Law Schools To Merge

For as long as anyone can remember, Rutgers has been operating 2 law schools. One in Newark and one in Camden. They are about to merge into one, details here

Query as to why Rutgers is doing this? Is it about money? U.S. News and World Reports rankings? or both?

Mitchell H. Rubinstein

 

April 9, 2013 in Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, April 7, 2013

St. John's Labor and Employment Law Blog

SJ_Logo
SJU Center for Labor

For readers who do not know, St. John's Law School has a very comprehensive labor and employment law program. The program is run by Professor David Gregory. The faculty and the program are outstanding. The program is student centered and the focus is on learning practical skills. The students have formed a blog which focuses on labor and employment law and it is quite good. I recommend that you check it out, here.

Mitchell H. Rubinstein

April 7, 2013 in Law Schools, Law Students | Permalink | Comments (0)