Adjunct Law Prof Blog

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Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Attorneys and Depression

Brian Clarke (Charlotte) has written an extremely important and ultimately courageous post, "Law Professors, Law Students and Depression . . . A Story of Coming Out (Part 1)" at The Faculty Lounge on depression and anxiety's alarming incidence among attorneys.  Clarke relates some truly disturbing statistics on depression and suicide in the legal profession (emphasis in original):

Lawyers, as a group, are 3.6 times more likely to suffer from depression than the average person. Of 104 occupations, lawyers were the most likely to suffer depression.  (Both of these statistics are from a Johns Hopkins University study to which I cannot find a link). 

Further, according to a two-year study completed in 1997, suicide accounted for 10.8% of all deaths among lawyers in the United States and Canada and was the third leading cause of death.  Of more importance was the suicide rate among lawyers, which was 69.3 suicide deaths per 100,000 individuals, as compared to 10 to 14 suicide deaths per 100,000 individuals in the general population.  In short, the rate of death by suicide for lawyers was nearly six times the suicide rate in the general population. 

Clarke continues along this vein and introduces his own story fighting mental illness in this first in a three-part series on the subject. 

Some states have added a mental health component to the continuing legal education requirements, and many state bar associations have established hotlines and resources for attorneys battling mental illness.  The Texas Lawyers Assistance Program serves this latter function in Texas -- the Program's 24-hour hotline number is 1-800-343-8527. 

Craig Estlinbaum

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/adjunctprofs/2014/04/attorneys-and-depression.html

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