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Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Supreme Court Takes Government Prayer Case

Thirty years ago in Marsh v. Chambers, 463 U.S. 783 (1983), the Supreme Court held in a divided opinion that opening legislative sessions with prayer did not violate the Establishment Clause.  But can the government open such legislative sessions with prayers exclusively with one faith?  The Supreme Court will decide this question next term in Town of Greece v. Galloway.  Last May, the Second Circuit held in the case that the town's practice to begin council sessions with prayer exclusively of the Christian faith violated the Establishment Clause.  Lyle Denniston at SCOTUSblog described the key holding in the circuit court's decision to be:

The Circuit Court stressed that it was not ruling that a local government could never open its meetings with prayers or a religious invocation, nor was it adopting a specific test that would allow prayer in theory but make it impossible in reality.

What it did rule, the Circuit Court said, was that “a legislative prayer practice that, however well-intentioned, conveys to a reasonable objective observer under the totality of the circumstances an official affiliation with a particular religion, violates the clear command of the [First Amendment's] Establishment Clause.”

It emphasized that, in the situation in Greece, New York, the overall impression of the practice was that it was dominated by Christian clergy and specific expressions of Christian beliefs, and that the town officials took no steps to try to dispel that impression.

Since the Court announced the decision to grant certiorari earlier today, the case has generated substantial buzz in the press, print and online, and promises to a significant and closely watched decision in the October 2013 term.

Craig Estlinbaum

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/adjunctprofs/2013/05/supreme-court-takes-government-prayer-case.html

Constitutional Law, First Amendment, Interesting Cases, Religion, Supreme Court | Permalink

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