Adjunct Law Prof Blog

Editor: Mitchell H. Rubinstein
New York Law School

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Monday, January 23, 2012

Lockouts In the News

More Lockouts As Companies Battle Unions is an interesting New York Times article by Steven Greenhouse. It is about increased use of offensive lockouts by employers who then turn around and hire temporary replacement workers. As the article states:

The number of strikes has declined to just one-sixth the annual level of two decades ago. That is largely because labor unions’ ranks have declined and because many workers worry that if they strike they will lose pay and might also lose their jobs to permanent replacement workers.

Lockouts, on the other hand, have grown to represent a record percentage of the nation’s work stoppages, according to Bloomberg BNA, a Bloomberg subsidiary that provides information to lawyers and labor relations experts. Last year, at least 17 employers imposed lockouts, telling their workers not to show up until they were willing to accept management’s contract offer.

Mitchell H. Rubinstein

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/adjunctprofs/2012/01/lockouts-in-the-news.html

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Comments

I am not always impressed by Greenhouse's pieces, but this time the article was quite effective in providinga quality perspective on the matter.

Posted by: Miss Move | Jan 24, 2012 7:38:01 AM

The article quotes a management side lawyer Robert Batterman stating "the pendulum has swung too far to the employees." I respect that he's demonstrating spin, in order to paint a picture favorable to his clients, but it is comical at best, and a WMD fabrication at worst to say the bargaining table favors the employees. What does Mr. Batterman wish to seek for his management clients for a more level playing field, elimination of employer provided health benefits or PTO?

A few minutes before President Obama gives his third State of the Union there is still no movement at all on card-check (even when there was a Democratic House and Senate).

To quote a Monday Night Football segment on ESPN... "Come on man!"

Posted by: Sujan Vasavada | Jan 24, 2012 6:11:10 PM

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