Law School Academic Support Blog

Editor: Amy Jarmon
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Big Brother, Bar Exam Edition

This past week, I uncharacteristically watched a lot of reality television show competitions—mostly, Big Brother and Project Runway. Somewhere around hour six of my binge, I had a revelation. Bar exam studiers could learn a few things from the contestants on reality TV game shows.  Both reality TV competitions and the bar exam studiers cram a lot of learning and formative assessment opportunities into a very short period of time.  Those who learn and adjust succeed. 

  1. Figure out which character you are.

Many reality TV contestants fit one of a few well-defined molds.  For example, there is:

  • The Leader – This person believes in themselves, even when others do not.  They possess a confidence that is objectively justified.  In Big Brother terms, this is called “The Rachel.”  Everyone loves (and loves to hate) Rachel.  This person will go quite far in the game.  
  • The Crier – This person cries, a lot. But have no fear.  They will make it to the final found.  They possess the substantive skills to succeed, and will succeed so long as they can focus on the task at hand.
  • The Floater – This person fails to commit to any particular side. When presented with a hypothetical, they waffle.  But, as Rachel Reilly of Big Brother’s Season 12 famously said “Floaters, you better grab a life vest.”  If these folks pick a horse, then they undoubtedly survive another week.
  • The Fainter – This person doesn’t take care of themselves. This person fails to get good sleep, eat well, or manage their stress.  They will eventually faint due to exhaustion.  This person can be successful if they regroup and care for themselves, properly.
  • The Middle - This person is typically forgettable on reality TV.  They don't win challenges, and they don't come in last place either.  They don't cause drama; instead they just put their head down and play the game.  This person will do just fine--even if no one is watching.  
  • The Weak Link – This person fails to win any challenges. This person is constantly placed “on the chopping block” because of their sub-par performances.  This person is legitimately at-risk.

Bar exam studiers are no different.  The key to success is to recognize the role you are playing and adjust accordingly.  Just like on Big Brother, leaders, criers, floaters, middlers, and even fainters can succeed with the proper planning.  Simply be self-aware and thoughtful about how you want the season to progress.    

  1. Learn to cut off the outside world.

Everyone on reality competitions is isolated from the outside world.  The competitors do not have access to social media or the internet.  They rarely speak to loved ones.  They live in a bubble.  While I do not recommend such an existence for most people, most days.  For law students studying for the bar exam, it is a potentially glorious plan.  For optimal success, most studiers should stay singularly focused on their task – the bar exam.  Forget about Facebook, Google, and Big Brother.  I promise you, the internet will still exist in August.  So, until then, just put up an “out of office” message and get studying!

  1. Develop a “showmance.”

On reality competitions, “showmances” and “bromances” are common.  Showmances are formed when two contestants bond together—sometimes romantically—during the show’s short production.  Two challengers lend support to one another for the purposes of mutual success in the competition.  While showmances are sometimes mocked by the viewing audience, they do offer numerous strategical benefits to the competitors.  Similarly, when studying for the bar exam, forming a deep, mutually beneficial relationship with another bar studier is advisable.  The two studiers can help keep each other on task, and offer a sounding board for test-taking ideas and substantive rules.  In short, look for a friend or significant other with which to commiserate and cerebrate. 

Best of luck competitors! (Kirsha Trychta)

July 17, 2018 in Bar Exam Preparation, Bar Exams, Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

What do a Master Sommelier, an Olympian, & a Lawyer All Have in Common?

Grit: a noun, meaning courage and resolve; strength of character. 

Numerous law review articles and research studies have discussed the importance of "grit" in law school success.  But grit isn't unique to academia; rather grit is essential for success in virtually any intense, high-stakes environment, including the Master Sommelier's exam and the Olympics.  Don't believe me?  Watch SOMM and WINNING to see just what I mean.  These two documentary movies (both currently available on Netflix) highlight the importance of grit, and help remind law students that:

1. You typically learn more from your failures than you do from your successes.  

2. Getting back up and trying again, especially when you're exhausted, is essential.

3. You should strive for perfection, so that if you fall a bit short, you'll still be successful.

4. You should want to succeed for yourself, not to please someone else; internal motivation is key.

SOMM "takes the viewer on a humorous, emotional and illuminating look into a mysterious world—the Court of Master Sommeliers and the massively intimidating Master Sommelier Exam. The Court of Master Sommeliers is one of the world's most prestigious, secretive, and exclusive organizations. Since its inception almost 40 years ago, less than 200 candidates have reached the exalted Master level. The exam covers literally every nuance of the world of wine, spirits and cigars. Those who have passed have put at risk their personal lives, their well-being, and often their sanity to pull it off. Shrouded in secrecy, access to the Court Of Master Sommeliers has always been strictly regulated, and cameras have never been allowed anywhere near the exam, until now." 

SOMM puts the effort needed to pass the bar exam into crisp perspective.  Law students will undoubtedly identify with one, or several, of the study strategies employed by the sommelier hopefuls.  Students may also appreciate the various outsiders' viewpoints offered by each test-taker's significant other. 

WINNING is one film about "five legendary athletes.  The compelling and inspiring story of the journeys of tennis champion Martina Navratilova, golf great Jack Nicklaus, Olympic gymnast Nadia Comaneci, track and field star Edwin Moses, and Dutch Paralympian Esther Vergeer. Through candid interviews and footage of their most exciting championship moments, WINNING reveals their dreams, challenges and triumphs and explores why some athletes achieve greatness."

WINNING highlights how impactful external pressures to succeed can be on one's psyche.  Those who succeeded in the athletic arena did so because they personally wanted to win.  Viewers takeaway a real appreciation for the concept that a genuine desire to prove to yourself that you can achieve your own goals will motivate you to wake-up early and stay late each day.  In addition, WINNING teaches the importance of striving for perfection while also maintaining realistic goals and expectations.  Students of the law, just like Olympians, are benefitted when they remain vigilant about identifying their personal weaknesses and looking for ways to improve upon those skills.  (Kirsha Trychta) 

 

 

 

February 6, 2018 in Encouragement & Inspiration, Film, Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Surveying the Room of Requirement

During the first week of class I asked my students if they had any lingering questions that weren't resolved during Orientation. Several students inquired, "Where is the student lounge?" Admittedly our student lounge is somewhat difficult to find, with the entrance tucked between two vending machine on the second floor. I gave them directions and then jokingly described the student lounge as a place that only appears to those law students who already know of its whereabouts—which incidentally helps keep the room secreted from non-law students looking for a cool new spot to relax. Students aptly pointed out that I had also inadvertently described a key aspect of the Room of Requirement, a magical all-purpose space that featured prominently in the latter-half of the Harry Potter series.  

[Sidenote: For those non-magical folk who aren’t familiar with Harry Potter, the Room of Requirement “only appears when a person has real need of it – and always comes equipped for the seeker's purpose. Any purpose.” For example, the Room of Requirement took the form of a bathroom for the headmaster when he was most in need, a training facility for Harry and the other members of his Army, and a storage room for many other students wishing to hide certain nefarious objects.]

The Potterheads were right, but if I had to pick the real Room of Requirement within the law school, it would undoubtedly be the Academic Excellence Center, especially in October. We never know who is going to walk through our door or what issue, question, or request they might bring with them. Just last week we fielded questions about academic advising, studying for midterm exams, debriefing after midterm exams, outlining, time management, moot court, legal writing, seminar papers, mental health resources, financial aid, new attorney swearing-in ceremonies, and summer employment, just to name a few.

I believe that my colleagues, while supportive of the Center, really don’t comprehend the varied roles that academic support professors play in the law school at any one time. To better capture the ever evolving list of activities within the Center, we recently installed a Survey Kiosk. The kiosk is actually an i-pad mounted on a chest-high stand near the door to the Center.  The i-pad is locked using Apple’s Guided Access feature so that visitors can only access one webpage, namely a survey link.

Survey wideways 2

We then created a 15-second survey that heavily relies on the use of skip logic. We now ask everyone to complete the survey following their visit to the Center.  We also posted the survey link to our Facebook page, just in case someone forgets to complete the questionnaire before leaving the Center.  The survey allows us to quickly capture the following information about each visit:

  • Visitor’s class year (prospective student, 1L, 2L, 3L, or graduate)
  • Who they visited within the Center
  • Whether the meeting was a walk-in or by appointment
  • Nature of the visit, i.e. the topic that was discussed
  • Overall usefulness of the meeting, rated on a Likert Scale; and
  • Any additional comments 

In just two months, we have received roughly 200 real-time responses. This data has already allowed us to track which days of the week and weeks within the semester generate increased foot traffic, how well the Dean’s Fellows and Peer Writing Consultants are connecting with their classmates, and the types of services being most utilized. Unsurprisingly, 1Ls continue to make-up the bulk of our client base. But, we anticipate a sharp increase in 3L foot traffic in the spring semester, when the 3Ls turn their attention to applying for and sitting for the bar exam.

This real-time kiosk system will replace our end-of-the-semester evaluation, which historically has suffered from low response rates.  The data should also be immensely helpful when we are tasked with completing annual Faculty Activity Reports and Performance Reviews next summer. Previously, we relied on a much less empirical system, consisting primarily of fuzzy memories, email inbox search results, and painstaking calendar reviews.

All-in-all, the Survey Kiosk has been a successful experiment, thus far.  If you’re interested in doing something similar at your institution, you can purchase a basic i-pad and stand for under $1,000.00—making this an ideal project to submit for a technology grant, especially in light of its relatively low cost and easy implementation. Finally, we are also happy to share our survey setup with you; just ask.  Unfortunately, we can't post the survey link here for you to view, because all of your curiosity clicks will create false responses in the data.  (Kirsha Trychta)

October 17, 2017 in Program Evaluation, Television, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Supermarket Sweep

Do you remember the game show “Supermarket Sweep”? (If not, click here for a short video.) The concept was simple: contestants had a short period of time to spend as much money as possible in a grocery store. The team with the highest total at the cash register won. Although the contestants were permitted to navigate the aisles in any manner they wished, the winning teams all tended to follow a predictable pattern to success. To win, contestants had to (1) pick-up numerous big ticket items, (2) grab a few specialty items, and (3) use their time efficiently. 

Bar studiers can follow a similar strategy for success in July. 

  1. Big Ticket Items

Whole hams, check. Super-sized tubs of condiments, check. Putting the “heavy lifting” items in the game show cart typically resulted in a good total at the cash register—but maybe not enough to win. Rather the contestants needed these big ticket items just to stay competitive. Likewise, bar studiers have to master certain subtopics, if they want to be competitive on game day. What’s the bar exam equivalent of a half-dozen fifty-pound bags of dog food? Answer: civil procedure jurisdiction, individual constitutional rights, contract formation, criminal homicide, evidentiary relevance, hearsay, and tortious negligence. According to the NCBE’s Subject Matter Outline, these big ticket items account for roughly one-quarter of the 200 MBE questions. Therefore, bar studiers are wise to pick-up these topics before moving on to the more nuanced specialty items. 

  1. Specialty Items

If you watched the video link, you might have asked yourself: “Why is everyone buying bottles of Lysol cleaner?” After all, Lysol retails for less than $10.00. Well, on that particular episode, Lysol was a specialty bonus item—an item that could result in a larger than expected payoff at the cash register (provided the contestant could find the small bottle in the vast store).  The bar exam is full of specialty items too.  Bar studiers must identify select, discrete subrules and exceptions that they can master very quickly, resulting in a positive return-on-investment.  A bar studier is not going to be able to acquire every  unique subrule or exception. Rather the bar studier must be strategic about spotting those particular rules that they can “put in their shopping cart” with just a small amount of targeted effort. For example, spending an hour to learn the difference between spousal immunity and confidential marital communication is time well spent. Conversely, spending three days spinning your wheels on that same question is not. After all, the clock is ticking. 

  1. Time Management

With only a few minutes to shop, contestants must use their time wisely. Similarly, bar studiers have to maximize their study time in July. Developing a detailed plan of attack for July tends to be the step most bar studiers skip; bar studiers mistakenly believe that all study hours are created equal. To ensure maximum time efficiency, bar studiers should use the results of their midterm exam to develop a day-by-day plan of attack for July. Bar studiers should start by deciding which topics will be tackled each day by identifying which topics will result in the biggest gains. A solid plan will surely include sufficient time to acquire any big tickets items that are not already in the bar studier’s cart and also include time to not only identify, but also learn select specialty rules. The plan should also incorporate a mix of non-negotiable language (“No matter what, I am going to …”) and some contingencies (“If time permits, I will…” or “I need X or Y, but would love both.”). I’ve attached a Download Calendar - Bar Exam July 2017 to help the bar studier start crafting his/her individualized plan for success. Once the plan is complete, the only thing left to do is execute with game-show-winning precision.

P.S. Happy Fourth of July! (Kirsha Trychta)

July 4, 2017 in Bar Exam Preparation, Study Tips - General, Television | Permalink | Comments (0)