Thursday, July 3, 2014

Dispatch from LWI

I just returned from the LWI Biennial in Philadelphia. Unfortunately, I was unable to stay the full three days, but I was able to attend the majority of the conference. And it was well worth it. I would strongly suggest Academic Support professionals with the means to attend legal writing conferences to do so. Legal writing and ASP have collaborated for as long as we have been a part of legal education, and our histories are intertwined.  ASP well-represented at LWI, and the sessions gave me much food for thought. An example was the presentation by Jeremy Francis of Michigan State. He presented on a long-term study of writing support. The study was one that could easily be replicated by ASP folks (with the assistance of institutional research or statisticians), and I found his results to be fascinating.  Katie Rose Guest Pryal of UNC Law gave a fascinating presentation on genre theory. For everyone reading this, thinking, "that's so legal writing, and I have nothing to do with legal writing," let me clarify. She presented on how to teach students the basics of all legal documents, but examining the similarities and differences between them. I left her presentation thinking, "WOW! This is a revolution in legal writing, and it has SO much applicability to ASP!" The ASP work being done by Chelsea Baldwin of Oklahoma City Law School has significant overlaps with Dr. Pryal; Chelsea is looking at the difference between doctrinal subject matter, and Dr. Pryal is looking at similarities. Both scholars are examining law in ways that can help our students see the big picture.

I would be remiss if I did not mention the number of ASPers who presented at LWI; Kris Franklin and Paula Manning had an amazing presentation on using visuals to teach students about applying and distinguishing cases, Corie Rosen (formerly of ASP, but still a friend of ASP) presented on positive psychology, Myra Orlen presented on the new normal, and Courtney Lee presented on bar support. I strongly recommend that ASPer's beg, borrow, or steal a copy of Kris and Paula's presentation materials--their material was a game changer. It is a credit to Kris that I have seen a version of her presentation several times, and yet I get something new from it each time. And if I missed anyone, I sincerely apologize, I wasn't able to attend the entire conference.

(RCF)

 

July 3, 2014 in Current Affairs, Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Done is better than perfect

I am in the middle (or actually, the middle of the end) of writing my first law review article in 7 years. It has been a monumental task, starting with the fact that I am terribly out of practice. The Bluebook has changed since the last time I published in a law review (and I wasn't great at Bluebooking to begin with!) I have only had a month of solid writing time, although I have been researching and writing piecemeal for almost a year. To get inspired this morning, because I am so tantalizingly close to the end, but just so burnt out and exhausted, I read an article in the Chronicle of Higher Ed comparing writing to running. I am a long distance runner, primarily at the 10k to half-marathon length, so I thought the article could help inspire me. And she did have some good advice.

Done is better than perfect. As I write, I think about all the connections I should be making. However, I don't have the time to write the article of my dreams, I have to finish. And done is better than perfect. I think this also applies to bar takers. So many high-achieving students get stuck during bar prep because they have trained themselves to be perfect. On law school exams, aiming for perfect is important if you want to be in the top of your class. But for bar prep, just getting the work done is more important than perfect. You can't be perfect when you have so many subjects to cover, and so little time.

Writing and running each require one small step. An article doesn't come out whole in a day or a week. Neither does bar prep. Each are about taking one small step, then another, and so on. Because if you look at the project, the race, or the bar exam, as one giant  monolith, you will never get started. And you have to get started. And you have to keep going when you only have 4 pages of a 30 page article, or you have only read one subject in a 15 subject outline, or you have run one mile, and have 12.1 more to go.

So with that, I need to get back to writing. I am working on one of my last sections, a section that is dear to my heart--ASP. And then I need to write my conclusions. Wish me luck. And to all of you working on the bar exam, good luck to you, too. I hope to see fellow ASPers at LWI next week.

(RCF)

 

 

June 28, 2014 in Advice, Bar Exam Issues, Bar Exam Preparation, Miscellany, Sports, Writing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, June 26, 2014

What Went Well at AASE

The Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE) convened in beautiful Indianapolis for their second annual conference.  What went well at AASE?  Well...the program was packed with creative, informative, and inspirational presentations; all in attendance can attest to knowing how to add multiple choice questions to help students achieve core competencies, recognize the implications FERPA has on Academic Support, and to design effective learning experiences for their students.  Plus, it was 80+ degrees and sunny!

In true ASP fashion, everyone was encouraged to acknowledge "what went well" by expressing their gratitude, thoughts, or observations to each other on index cards.  While this was conceived at the inaugural AASE conference, I am happy to report that it has now become a tradition.  Honoring each other in this manner is such a gift.  Both receiving an index card or giving one provides a great opportunity for us to show our support for each other.

In addition to the amazing presentations, the conference provided the perfect venue to network (and dance) with AASE members and Indianapolis was the perfect backdrop.  A huge thanks to the program and planning committees and to the host school representative Carlotta Toledo for organizing such a wonderful conference.  Next year's AASE conference will be in Chicago, at John Marshall Law School, and our host school representative will be Jamie Kleppetcshe.  

June 26, 2014 in Current Affairs, Meetings, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, May 18, 2014

Please Update your information on the Law School Academic Success Project Website

The following post to the ASP listserv is from O. J. Salinas requesting your help in updating our directory information on the Law School Academic Success Project Website:

Good morning, fellow ASP-ers!  We hope you have had a great semester. 

As the academic year comes to a close, we were hoping to ask for a little favor to assist us in continuing to streamline the Law School Academic Success Project website (http://lawschoolasp.org/index.php). Often times, some of us change schools or our professional titles change.  We would like to make sure that the information that we have listed in our directory is correct.  If your information needs updating or your law school’s information needs updating, please forward that information to O.J. Salinas (osalinas@email.unc.edu).  We will work on making the appropriate corrections.

Here are a few suggestions that can help us update our directory:

1.     For those of you who have access to the website and have your contact information listed in the website directory, please review your information in the directory for any corrections.  If your information needs updating, please forward that information to O.J. Salinas (osalinas@email.unc.edu).

2.     While you are reviewing your information to ensure that it is correct, please also review the information for your law school (you can search the directory by your name or your school).  If the directory lists individuals who are no longer affiliated with your school, please let us know.  When colleagues leave their schools, we often do not get notification.  Likewise, if you have a new ASP colleague who has joined your school (and this colleague wants access to the website), please let us know as well.  You can forward changes to the directory information for your law school to O.J. Salinas (osalinas@email.unc.edu).

3.     Finally, remember that gaining access to the LSASP website does not automatically mean that you will be included in the directory.  Some of you may have access to the website, but your contact information is not listed in the website directory.  If you want to be listed in our directory, please email O.J. Salinas (osalinas@email.unc.edu).  In your email, include what information you want listed with your name for the directory.  Generally, this information includes your law school, your title, and your contact information.  If you want your picture included, please include a headshot photograph as well. 

Thank you all for helping us continue to update the website.  We think that the website has some wonderful resources for the ASP community.  We hope to be able to make further enhancements in the future.  Enjoy the rest of the day, and have a great weekend!

 

- O.J. Salinas

On behalf of the LSASP Website Committee

Oscar J. Salinas, J.D., M.A. (Counseling)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Law
University of North Carolina School of Law
4090 Van Hecke-Wettach Hall
919-962-0279
919-962-1277 (fax)
osalinas@email.unc.edu
http://meetme.so/ojsalinas


 

May 18, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 9, 2014

The Casebook Controversy

For those of you who have been following the casebook controversy about Aspen's Casebook Connect, here is a link to an article today in The Chronicle of Higher Education: Law Professors Defend Students' Right to Sell Used Textbooks.

May 9, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 2, 2014

The Village Green Preservation Society

A few weeks ago, a student approached me regarding a new app for law school.  His idea sounded interesting, and I hope it goes far and makes him enough money to breed rainbow-colored unicorns, but the use of tech in law school has been something I've been unsure about for years.

At heart, I am a Neo Luddist (I unironically own a VCR and a turntable).  I have no data to back myself up, but I am not a fan of tech in law school education for a few reasons:

1.  Tech in general makes research much faster -- consequently, a lot of research is fairly shallow.

2.  Tech in general makes struggling for the answer to something an alien concept.  The answer to any question in the world is sitting in your pocket (unless you left your phone on your dresser).

3.  Tech is widening the divide between haves and have-nots -- at least prior to their entry to law school.

4.  Word processing makes writing voluminous assignments much easier, when brevity is the soul of ..

5.  Got distracted.  Tech is distracting.  Hey, look, a cat wearing a crown!

5.  Spellcheck is the Devil.

6.  Education sometimes seems to praise tech for tech's sake.

7.  For Bar Prep stuff, I think having a live instructer makes students more beholden to the class -- it's a lot harder to walk out on a live person or to blow off lectures that you know you can't watch later.

8.  Tech is ridiculously fun -- students can do a bazillion other things on a laptop rather than listen to a lecture -- 9 times out of 10, they probably are.

9.  Cat wearing pajamas!  Sorry, got distracted again.

10.  Powerpoint trains people to think in Powerpoint.

That being said, tech was invaluable in teaching my class on Art and Copyright because I could immediately play music samples and show paintings to illustrate points.  And clickers and in-class polls are pretty fun (although I don't know if they necessarily teach concepts any better than practice questions on paper).

I continue to struggle with the issue -- and it's clearly the wave of the future (much like kickboxing) -- but sometimes I think it might be something that actually makes current law study harder than it might have been in the past.

Look!  Cat wearing a bathing suit!  (Alex Ruskell)

 

 

May 2, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Enrollments, Profiles, and Projections

I wanted to draw everyone's attention to two postings by Jerry Organ on The Legal Whiteboard.  Rodney Fong at University of San Francisco School of Law brought the first post to my attention, and then I noticed the second post later.  The first post is Thoughts on Fall 2013 Enrollment and Profile Data Among Law Schools.  The second post is Projections for Law School Enrollment for Fall 2014.  This second post is the first installment of what will likely be a two installments, according to the author.  (Amy Jarmon)   

April 15, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 14, 2014

Life Versus Television

The drama!  The tears!  The gnashing of teeth!  Just another day at law school where students are reacting to the latest round of mid-term grades, a last-minute change in a course syllabus, newly scheduled make-up classes, or switched sides for the legal practice appellate brief.  Some law students are beside themselves at the very audacity of it all.

Add to those dramas: gossip about the latest student fashion faux pas, catty remarks about a student's  in-class response to a professor's question, whispered speculation about professors' lives, and wild rumors about the job market.  Mix it all together and what do you get?  Law school's version of Reality TV.

Yes, law school has a fishbowl aspect to it - too many people in one building without any relief.  Yes, it is stressful with exams roughly four weeks away.  Yes, some law students are easy targets for gossip and snide remarks.   Yes, professors have lives outside the classroom.  Yes, there are lots of rumors out there. 

However, law students need to step away from the remote and get some perspective.  Life happens.  It happens everywhere.  In and out of law school.  And many of the things that get blown out of proportion as tragedies in law school are extremely minor compared to the real tragedies in life. 

Being diagnosed with cancer, finding out your relative is seriously ill, having your spouse unexpectedly file for divorce, having your house burn down - those are tragedies.  The little things in life are irritations, inconveniences, disappointments, or annoyances in comparison.  They are not tragedies.

So take ten deep breaths.  Have a reality check.  And turn off the TV until after exams.  (Amy Jarmon) 

April 14, 2014 in Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 10, 2014

College Majors and LSAT Scores and Undergraduate GPAs

Hat tip to Paul Caron on the Tax Prof Blog for a posting about undergraduate majors and LSAT scores and undergraduate GPAs.  The post can be found here: College Majors and LSAT-UGPA.

April 10, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, March 28, 2014

Pictures of Matchstick Men

 

 

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I'm a huge fan of Peter T. Wendel's illustration of the different "planes" of a case (from his book, Deconstructing Legal Analysis).  The idea that there are three discrete levels of thought and analysis involved in cases seems to be helpful and rather mind-blowing for many students.  I've also found it particularly helpful when I am trying to help students categorize and breakdown different rules and ideas (like breaking up the levels of scrutiny in a Con Law question, or splitting apart subject matter and personal jurisdiction on an essay).  So, I drew a picture.

I'm not sure if it exactly inspires confidence, but it gives students something to look at during a lecture besides me.

(Alex Ruskell) 

March 28, 2014 in Advice, Miscellany, Teaching Tips | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 17, 2014

Do you have photos from the January 2014 Academic Support sessions at AALS?

If you have photos that you took in January 2014 at AALS in New York City during the Section on Academic Support business meeting, program, or lunch, please send them to Louis Schulze at Florida International University School of Law for inclusion in our next AALS newsletter.  His e-mail address is lschulze@fiu.edu.  Thank you!

March 17, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 8, 2014

A Dean's LIfe

Our readers may be interested in a recent article published in the Chronicle of Higher Education that discusses being a good dean or a mediocre dean.  Although it is written by a pair of former education deans, it is relevant to the lives of law school deans as well.

I noted the point about how important certain "dispositions" are for a good dean.  Perhaps these dispositions explain in part why some of our own ASP'ers have gone on to being highly successful deans!  The link is here: A Tale of 2 Deans.  (Amy Jarmon) 

March 8, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Listen Like a Lawyer

If you have not discovered it yet, I recommend taking a look at the Listen Like a Lawyer Blog.  Jennifer Murphy Romig from Emory University School of Law has some postings that deal with law students specifically.  Here are several to look at that deal with listening in the law school classroom:

  • September 30, 2013: Listening check-up for first-semester law students
  • October 11, 2013: The listening technique that worked for me in law school
  • February 11, 2014: Listening in law school: second-semester update. 

There are other law school related postings that deal with externships, interviews, and other topics. (Amy Jarmon)

February 26, 2014 in Miscellany, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

"The front lines of student care."

Check out Lisa McElroy's post, which highlights the discrepancies in status and salary that legal writers (and ASPers) face.   http://www.dorfonlaw.org/2014/02/are-legal-writing-professors-like-nurses.html

LBY

February 25, 2014 in Current Affairs, Miscellany, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Can't Hardly Wait

The woman sat on the other side of the desk from me. She looked angry, and I was starting to get sick as I saw all the things within easy arm-reach that she could club or stab me with -- my 1983 Safety Patrol award (marble), my "Bonecrusher" nameplate (sharp-looking wood and brass), two pairs of scissors (why do I have two pairs?), a tape dispenser, and a stapler.

She was mad, she was failing, and she was pretty sure it was her professor's fault. "He doesn't tell us what the law is -- EVER -- we have to figure it out for ourselves! If he's not going to teach us or tell us anything, what is he doing up there?

My initial gut reaction was that the student was simply looking to be spoonfed the information, and that she had to learn that law school was not going to work that way. Part of me (probably my right ankle) started to think that this was due to laziness or a lack of intellectual curiousity or training -- all things I was going to fix with weekly meetings to keep her on track. Probably lots of practice questions. Maybe some multiple choice. Maybe some sample outlines.

But then, another part of me (my index finger on my left hand) began to think that maybe her problem, deep down, is that we live in an amazing world where techology has made everything instantly available. And then another part of me (forehead, just above the bald spot), thought -- SHE MAY NEVER REMEMBER A WORLD ANY DIFFERENT AND THAT MAY HAVE WARPED EVERYTHING.

A few years ago I was teaching a class on copyright (mainly music sampling), and I was sitting in front of the class playing them songs and samples. Someone brought up the mashup artist Girl Talk, and someone brought up Danger Mouse's Grey Album, and then we were off, bouncing around the Internet, finding this song and that sample so we all understood exactly what the cases and parties were talking about, and exactly what artists were trying to create.

And every time it took the three seconds or so to bring up whatever thing we were looking for, you would have thought we were sentenced to 10 years in a penal colony. Eyes rolled up to the ceiling, pencils tapped -- even I, the guy running the show who still remembered "4-6 weeks delivery" for a Boba Fett action figure, was getting frustrated with these minimal holdups.

I think this amazing, techno, jet-pack world we live in is actually doing a number on thinking and education. Students are not getting more needy or less intelligent or less prepared. They just can't wait.

The amazingness of our world makes many of the basic tasks of law school incredibly difficult because those tasks take time -- reading long and dry opinions, sitting in one place, listening to someone in front of you explaining something, looking at a tax code -- when one's mind wants to wander and ...

BING BANG BOOM -- I CAN INSTANT MESSAGE!  WORDS WITH FRIENDS!  A DRONE JUST DELIVERED MY NEW SHOES! I CAN INSTANTLY FIND OUT WHO WAS IN MORRISSEY'S FIRST BAND! I HAVE 400 BIRTHDAY MESSAGES AND 9 FRIEND REQUESTS! MY BEST FRIEND IS LIVE-TWEETING AND INSTAGRAMMING THE BIRTH OF HER FIRST CHILD! THIS CAT CAN JUGGLE FLAMING TORCHES! I CAN SEE AND SPEAK TO THE ENTIRE WORLD, GET ALL THE KNOWLEDGE THAT IS OUT THERE, RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW, QUICKER THAN IMMEDIATELY, FROM THIS VERY SEAT--I DON'T HAVE TO WAIT FOR ANYTHING!  

We ask our students to swim deeply into the law -- we ask them to consider and calculate and ruminate -- all things that they will need in practice, but things they may have never had to practice in their lives.

"What should I do next semester? What do I need to know for the exam? Do you have an outline and practice questions I can do?" asked the woman, her fingers twitching just above Prosser and Keeton on Torts (oh no -- how'd that get there?)

"I think we need to work on waiting -- let's start with your daily schedule," I said, realizing we would need to start at the beginning, slowly. (Alex Ruskell)

January 9, 2014 in Miscellany, Teaching Tips | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, December 23, 2013

Happy Holidays and Best Wishes for 2014

All of us here at the Law School Academic Support Blog hope that you and yours enjoy the holiday season.  The Blog will be taking a vacation while law schools are closed for the semester break.  We will look forward to having our readers back in early January.

December 23, 2013 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, November 3, 2013

More Quick Study Tips

Here are a few more study tips from students and others:

  • Consider putting your outlines on your Kindle for ease in carrying them with you - especially if you are leaving for the Thanksgiving Break.
  • For first-year courses, you might want to consider purchasing the maps at picjur.com: Torts, Contracts, Civil Procedure, and Criminal Law are all available in visual versions.
  • If you rather listen to text rather than read it, you might want to consider two options: Dictation and Speech for Macs reads text that can be converted with iTunes for your iPhone; Outlines Outloud is an app that syncs your computer outlines with your iPhone for listening.
  • Check out the website for the Board of Law Examiners in your state to see if they post old exam questions for your state-specific courses; practice questions are sometimes hard to find for state-specific topics, and old bar questions can be a plus.
  • Remember to check your own law school's exam database for past exams in a course; even if they are for a different professor, the exams may provide good practice questions.
  • Use a table to help you easily see the variations of the same rule (common law, restatement, uniform code, majority jurisdiction, minority jurisdiction, etc.) that you have to learn for an exam.

Exploring solutions that others have already found successful saves you time at a critical point in the semester.  (Amy Jarmon)

November 3, 2013 in Miscellany, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, November 1, 2013

Update on AASE membership

If you are interested in membership in AASE (Association of Academic Support Educators) please note that your inquiries should be directed to aasemembership@gmail.com. You should receive an email with an application within a week of your inquiry. AASE is moving the membership process from UNLV to a more permanent model, with one email address. 

And just a reminder that AASE is planning a FABULOUS conference in Indianapolis, to be held May 30-June 1, 2014. 

For more information about AASE, please see http://www.academicsupporteducators.org 

(RCF)

November 1, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight, Meetings, Miscellany, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 13, 2013

What are you trying to accomplish in law school?

There are many things that we want our students to accomplish in law school.  Each law school has a mission statement and various goals/objectives.  All of us have been in on discussions as to what we want to have happen during three years of law school (or four or two depending on the model). 

I made the following list for my students to ponder because some of them had not really thought about what they wanted to accomplish in law school and how it relates to future practice.  The list is not all-inclusive nor is it in a perfect order.  Instead it is a starting point for my students' reflection.

  • Learn how to solve legal problems.
  • Learn to use a legal vocabulary precisely.
  • Learn the details of our U.S. legal system.
  • Learn basic legal concepts and principles for a variety of courses.
  • Learn how to use legal reasoning strategies to analyze any legal problem.
  • Learn how to argue both sides of any legal problem.
  • Learn how to use policy arguments appropriately.
  • Learn how to research the law.
  • Learn how to write objective and persuasive legal documents.
  • Learn ethical principles that will promote success in practice.
  • Learn professional skills to manage work assignments, time, and stress.
  • Learn legal skills and a foundation in the law to facilitate passing the bar exam on the first attempt.
  • Learn legal skills, a foundation in the law, and ethical behavior to facilitate being a respected lawyer among your colleagues and clients.

If students get too focused on the next reading assignment or the next exam question, they miss why they are here and what they can gain from the experience.  ASPers work with faculty to help our students accomplish these items before they graduate.  It is a team effort.  (Amy Jarmon)  

October 13, 2013 in Miscellany, Professionalism | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 6, 2013

They Do Not Understand

Law students, as well as recent graduates studying for the bar exam, often lament that family and friends do not understand why they are studying all the time and feel unable to participate in social events on a regular basis or spontaneously any more. 

Law students find that others expect them to act the same way they did before law school.  Whether they were in college, employed, or in another graduate program previously, the law student is expected to be ready, willing, and able to go out to dinner and the movies, to spend a weekend out of town, to attend every family event, and so forth. 

Bar studiers have the difficulty of others thinking that now after three years of law school the bar exam should be a breeze.  Their family and friends have waited three long years to have them back to normal!  They did not expect the new graduates to turn around almost immediately and become hermits (in their minds) yet again.

The only people who readily understand the life of law school and bar study are those who have been in the midst of those commitments as law students and bar studiers.  There are two resources for families and friends that may be useful to pass on to help these important people in life to understand:

  1. For law students: The Companion Text to Law School: Understanding and Surviving Life with a Law Student by Andrew J. McClurg (Thomson Reuters 2012).
  2. For bar studiers: "Chapter 4: Preparing Your Significant Others for the Bar Exam" in Pass the Bar! by Denise Riebe and Michael Hunter Schwartz (Carolina Academic Press 2006).

Each law student or bar studier has to determine realistic boundaries on their time - what can I do and what can I not do and still succeed on my goals.  Then a heart-to-heart discussion with family and friends will hopefully help lead to understanding.  Some law students or bar studiers have to rehearse their side of the discussions.  

Ultimately, the law students or bar studiers have to honor their own goals and boundaries.  Giving in or being consumed by guilt will not help.  The best you can do is try to explain diplomatically and use one of the resources listed to provide an outside perspective if you think it will help.  (Amy Jarmon)   

October 6, 2013 in Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)