Friday, November 1, 2013

Update on AASE membership

If you are interested in membership in AASE (Association of Academic Support Educators) please note that your inquiries should be directed to aasemembership@gmail.com. You should receive an email with an application within a week of your inquiry. AASE is moving the membership process from UNLV to a more permanent model, with one email address. 

And just a reminder that AASE is planning a FABULOUS conference in Indianapolis, to be held May 30-June 1, 2014. 

For more information about AASE, please see http://www.academicsupporteducators.org 

(RCF)

November 1, 2013 in Academic Support Spotlight, Meetings, Miscellany, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 13, 2013

What are you trying to accomplish in law school?

There are many things that we want our students to accomplish in law school.  Each law school has a mission statement and various goals/objectives.  All of us have been in on discussions as to what we want to have happen during three years of law school (or four or two depending on the model). 

I made the following list for my students to ponder because some of them had not really thought about what they wanted to accomplish in law school and how it relates to future practice.  The list is not all-inclusive nor is it in a perfect order.  Instead it is a starting point for my students' reflection.

  • Learn how to solve legal problems.
  • Learn to use a legal vocabulary precisely.
  • Learn the details of our U.S. legal system.
  • Learn basic legal concepts and principles for a variety of courses.
  • Learn how to use legal reasoning strategies to analyze any legal problem.
  • Learn how to argue both sides of any legal problem.
  • Learn how to use policy arguments appropriately.
  • Learn how to research the law.
  • Learn how to write objective and persuasive legal documents.
  • Learn ethical principles that will promote success in practice.
  • Learn professional skills to manage work assignments, time, and stress.
  • Learn legal skills and a foundation in the law to facilitate passing the bar exam on the first attempt.
  • Learn legal skills, a foundation in the law, and ethical behavior to facilitate being a respected lawyer among your colleagues and clients.

If students get too focused on the next reading assignment or the next exam question, they miss why they are here and what they can gain from the experience.  ASPers work with faculty to help our students accomplish these items before they graduate.  It is a team effort.  (Amy Jarmon)  

October 13, 2013 in Miscellany, Professionalism | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 6, 2013

They Do Not Understand

Law students, as well as recent graduates studying for the bar exam, often lament that family and friends do not understand why they are studying all the time and feel unable to participate in social events on a regular basis or spontaneously any more. 

Law students find that others expect them to act the same way they did before law school.  Whether they were in college, employed, or in another graduate program previously, the law student is expected to be ready, willing, and able to go out to dinner and the movies, to spend a weekend out of town, to attend every family event, and so forth. 

Bar studiers have the difficulty of others thinking that now after three years of law school the bar exam should be a breeze.  Their family and friends have waited three long years to have them back to normal!  They did not expect the new graduates to turn around almost immediately and become hermits (in their minds) yet again.

The only people who readily understand the life of law school and bar study are those who have been in the midst of those commitments as law students and bar studiers.  There are two resources for families and friends that may be useful to pass on to help these important people in life to understand:

  1. For law students: The Companion Text to Law School: Understanding and Surviving Life with a Law Student by Andrew J. McClurg (Thomson Reuters 2012).
  2. For bar studiers: "Chapter 4: Preparing Your Significant Others for the Bar Exam" in Pass the Bar! by Denise Riebe and Michael Hunter Schwartz (Carolina Academic Press 2006).

Each law student or bar studier has to determine realistic boundaries on their time - what can I do and what can I not do and still succeed on my goals.  Then a heart-to-heart discussion with family and friends will hopefully help lead to understanding.  Some law students or bar studiers have to rehearse their side of the discussions.  

Ultimately, the law students or bar studiers have to honor their own goals and boundaries.  Giving in or being consumed by guilt will not help.  The best you can do is try to explain diplomatically and use one of the resources listed to provide an outside perspective if you think it will help.  (Amy Jarmon)   

October 6, 2013 in Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, October 4, 2013

Missing Home and Life

It is the point in the semester that students (especially 1Ls) remark that they are missing family, friends, pets, and other aspects of the environment that they had over the summer.  Their sense of loss seems worse than earlier in the semester because the newness of the semester has worn off and the approach of exams is a reality.  

Some students talk about missing younger siblings, nieces, and nephews.  Some students talk about missing parents, grandparents, and aunts or uncles.  Some students miss their dogs and cats - or horses since this is Texas after all.  For others, it is members of the familiar community that are missed (pastors, staff at a place they volunteered, mentors, colleagues at a summer job).  It may also be certain routines from home: the local basketball league, the local karate studio, the regulars at the coffe shop near home.

It helps if students feel at home in the new community that surrounds their law school.  The temptation is to believe that law school allows no time for life.  Here are some ways for students to feel more connected to the people that matter and were left behind and to build a new sense of community in the new location:

  • Build time into your schedule to connect with friends and family back home by telephone.  Perhaps the telephone call will be at the end of the evening as a reward for staying on track throughout the day.  Or schedule a longer phone call for the weekend as something to look forward to when your time is more flexible. 
  • Schedule a time each week when you will write a letter or postcard (yes, receiving snail mail is special to folks!) to your younger sibling or grandmother or another person you are missing.  You can also send e-mail, but it does not have the same special quality for the receiver.
  • If you are missing being around children, hang out for an afternoon with a law student who has children and enjoy that family's little ones.
  • If you are missing your pet, ask fellow law students if you can play fetch with the family dogs or love up on their cats.
  • Volunteer once a week in your law school community to make a connection in your new town.  You will meet new people and feel that you are contributing to your new environment.
  • Join a church, synagogue, or other religious group in your new community to fill the void you feel because you no longer are near your home group.
  • Set up a routine that mimics your home routine: go to the recreation center at your university, look for a karate studio in your new city, play a pick up basketball game with fellow law students.

You do not want to overextend yourself with too many activities.  However, you also do not want to isolate yourself.  Find ways to have reasonable outlets in your law school environment.

Setting up a routine time management schedule to use your time efficiently and effectively can help you see where you can become involved without feeling guilty.  If you need help with time management, contact the academic success professional at your law school for assistance.  (Amy Jarmon) 

 

 

October 4, 2013 in Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Regret

As I imagine is the case in most law schools, our orientation at South Carolina is absolutely packed. This year, I only had 20 minutes to speak, where in years past I might have had an hour or two. I used to try to cram in as much as I could -- from time management to study groups to stress to exam writing -- but this year there was no way I could do so. Consequently, I took a different approach and focused on the Top Eight Regrets of Students Who Did Poorly in Their First Semester (I am a huge fan of listicles -- I'll read anything if the title has "Top" followed by some number -- considering the success of Buzzfeed and Cracked, I have the feeling many of our students feel the same way).

Over the years, I've asked poor-performing students what they wished they had done differently, and this is the list I got:

1. Didn't attend tutoring or Academic Success Workshops.

2. Didn't have or stick to a strict study schedule (treat law school like a job).

3. Didn't outline until the very end of the semester (or relied on other students' outlines).

4. Didn't meet with their professors.

5. Treated law school like undergrad.

6. Let Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing get away from them.

7. Spent all of their time reading and preparing for class -- did not do practice questions, work on oultines, or meet with study groups.

8. Let law school stress overwhelm them.

I focused on this list in Orientation, and as the semester has progressed, students have repeatedly mentioned one or another of the points (either in tutoring or Workshops or during individual meetings). A presentation structure and focus borne out of basic necessity seems to have lodged itself in the minds of the student body in a way that a broader presentation did not, and I think it has had a direct effect on the large amount of student traffic the Academic Success Program has had. Even though the semester has been going for several weeks now, I'm thinking about sending it around again, just to remind them. (Alex Ruskell)

 

October 1, 2013 in Meetings, Miscellany, Orientation | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

National Punctuation Day

Today is National Punctuation Day!  Any of us who work with students on the legal writing aspects of law school or lawyering skills know that many students struggle with correct punctuation.  Commas show up in all sorts of places they are not needed.  Semicolons are exotic for our students.  Where the punctuation goes in relation to the final quotation mark in a sentence is a mystery for many.  And apostrophes are appearing in amazing locations. 

My praise, empathy, and heartfelt thanks to all ASP'ers and professors who join in the fight to train lawyers who will correctly place the punctuation in their drafted legislation, contracts, legal memoranda, and other documents.  (Amy Jarmon) 

September 24, 2013 in Miscellany, Writing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, September 22, 2013

ABA Draft Report on the Future of Legal Education

Readers might be interested in two links regarding the ABA Draft Report on Legal Education.  The first link is to the draft report itself which is on the ABA website: ABA Draft Report of the Task Force on the Future of Legal Education . The second link is an article in the September 20th Chronicle of Higher Education: Chronicle of Higher Education Aricle . 

September 22, 2013 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Can You Hear Me Now?

In the last few weeks, I have had students commenting in sessions on their inability to hear professors.  It is not because the students are hearing-impaired.  Instead it seems to be from two sources: less than optimal classroom acoustics or professor characteristics.  What has struck me about the problem is that the students (whether 1L or upper-division) are reluctant to mention the problem to the professors.  The students in the back rows prefer to miss out on sections of class rather than take any risk to resolve the problem.

Now I can understand more readily when the hesitation is because of a soft-spoken or mumbling professor.  After all, one wants to be diplomatic and not seem critical.  But when acoustics are involved, there is no "personal failing" on the part of the professor that would make it awkward.

Here are some possible ways for students to handle the situation tactfully:

  • For true  acoustical problems, see if the AV/IT staff can approach the professor about wearing a microphone because they are aware of the poor acoustics and want to remedy the problem.
  • Once a professor is aware of the problem and trying to remedy it, let the professor know if you can't hear: wave from the back of the room as an agreed-upon signal for example.
  • If the problem is hearing fellow students when they are answering/asking questions, perhaps ask the professor to prompt students to speak up or to hand the students a hand-held microphone each time.
  • If the room has other empty seats, move to a spot where it is easier to hear.  If the professor uses a seating chart, ask permission to move to an empty seat before doing so.
  • Blame it on acoustics - perhaps even when it is not the total cause of the problem.  If people in the back two or three rows cannot hear the professor, then indicate that there is a dead spot and would the professor mind using a microphone or speaking louder.
  • Have a group of students approach the faculty member together so that no one person feels embarrassed about bringing it up.  Or write a diplomatically worded group note/e-mail to the professor.
  • If it is a class with a teaching assistant (for example, a first-year doctrinal course), explain the problem to the TA and see if that person is willing to approach the professor so that the information can be passed on anonymously.

Most professors will be very glad to know if there is a problem.  A diplomatic discussion between students and the professor would be ideal.  After all, it shows that the students think what the professor is saying is important and they do not want to miss it!  (Amy Jarmon) 

September 19, 2013 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Fear of Public Speaking

People expect that all lawyers are good public speakers.  Lawyers, and even law students, are frequently asked to be the spokesperson for a group in many different settings on the theory that since they are lawyers, they are quick on their feet.  However, speaking in front of a group can be a very stressful and frightening experience for some people.  Many law schools require students take a course which includes an oral advocacy component.  Other students may choose to take a trial practice course or other class which requires a verbal presentation.  What can a student do to conquer their fears and become an eloquent public speaker?  As we know from the television show, Fear Factor, the best way to overcome a fear is to face it.  The problem becomes finding the best opportunity to practice this skill.  This can be difficult due to the lack of time and resources. Some possible strategies to practice include having a student start an oral argument study group.  Students can gather at regular intervals and practice speaking in front of each other in one of the school’s moot court rooms.  If students are reluctant to practice with each other, encourage a student to attend or start a Toastmasters group at your school. There is an excellent book called The Articulate Attorney by Brian Johnson and Marsha Hunter which breaks down the process of public speaking into the areas of body awareness, mind discipline and control of the voice.  Help students really understand from where their fear arises.  For many, the fear of being “judged” by their peers in class while speaking is the root cause. Students should know that as lawyers, they will be judged daily by clients, opposing counsel and judges.  This is an opportunity for the student to see that practicing the skill of conversation in the form of client counseling, oral argument or giving a public speech is invaluable.  Once the student is comfortable talking in front of a group, transition to the next level by arranging with your media center to record a student’s moot court argument.  Debrief together in person. Examine what is happening on the tape and ask the student what they are thinking and feeling at each moment.  They might  be surprised to find that they do not appear as nervous as they feel.  Finally, help the student to find strategies that make them prepared to speak by taking a written script down to an outline and finally to a memorized list of topics.  Hopefully with time, the student will feel more comfortable speaking in front of a group and maybe even come to enjoy it. (Bonnie Stepleton)

September 18, 2013 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

The Beloit Mindset 2017

For those of us who know it is a new academic year when the Beloit Mindset becomes available, here is the link to the information for the undergraduate Class of 2017: http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2017/.  (Amy Jarmon)

August 20, 2013 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Upcoming 1Ls: Top Ten List

Most law schools will hold orientation for new first-year students within the next couple of weeks.  It is an exciting time - and a bit scary.  Here is my top ten list of things 1L students should think about and do before arriving for the first day of law school:

  • Move in a few days ahead of time to get unpacked and settled.  You will feel less hassled if your apartment is ready, you have explored your new city, and you have taken care of cable, Internet, and errands before orientation begins.
  • Take care of as many school-related tasks as you can beforehand: parking permit, school e-mail account, immunizations, payment of bills, and other items.  Most law schools have ways for you to accomplish many tasks on-line ahead of your arrival.
  • Make a list of the reasons why you want to go to law school and to be a lawyer.  When you get tired during the semester, the list will remind you why all of the hard work is worth it.
  • Make a list of the personal attributes that you have and the values that you hold dear.  These things make you unique and worthwhile as a person.  When you get overwhelmed and begin to wonder who you are, the list will ground you and remind you that you are still that unique and valuable person.
  • Consider what you want to say to introduce yourself to the myriad of new people you will meet.  Everyone who is a new first-year student is outstanding, so bragging and bravado will probably be less successful than you may think.  You want to come across confident and genuine.  Also think about the different audiences that you will be meeting: fellow 1L students; upper-division students; professors; decanal staff. 
  • Spend time with your family and friends now.  You are going to enter a very busy phase in your life.  You will not have the same amount of leisure time as you have been used to previously.  Fill your last summer days with quality time spent with others.
  • Participate in your favorite activities before you leave home. Go to the movies; play pool with friends; go hiking or camping; spend the evenings salsa dancing; read fluff novels.  You can have regular down time in law school if you manage your time well.  However, some activities may need to be saved for special occasions or vacations rather than being weekly events.
  • Prepare your mind set for new experiences, different challenges, and the need to adopt new strategies.  Law school will require new study methods, present new ways of writing, and require acceptance of "it depends" analysis.  You will be less stressed if you can remain flexible and open to new ideas and methods.  Most law students feel uncertain initially until they gain more expertise in this new environment.
  • Get in touch with your spiritual side.  Whatever your belief system is, you will feel less alone and overwhelmed if you are not carrying the weight of the world all by yourself.       
  • Get plenty of sleep and establish a routine now.  For your brain to work well, you need at least 7-8 hours of sleep at regular times each night.  Start going to bed and getting up now to match what your class schedule will be.  If you do not know your classes yet, aim for 11 p.m. bed time and 7 a.m. wake up.

Safe travels to your new law school.  Best wishes for your semester.  (Amy Jarmon)

August 8, 2013 in Advice, Miscellany, Orientation | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

The days are long and the (summer) months are short

Summer is the season that non-bar prep ASPer's decide they are going to get caught up on everything. However, that is rarely the case. Although it can feel like eternity to be stuck in an office when the sun is shining and the beach is beckoning (especially for those of us in New England and the Midwest, where the sun only shines 5-6 months a year), the reality is that the summer flies by. UMass begins orientation next week. Classes start for all students in two weeks. My to-do list is still very long, and I have little time to finish everything that needs to get done. Despite the pit in my stomach when I look at my list, I know everything will get completed. Here are some tips for wrapping up the summer: 

1) Make a two-column list:

In the first column, lists everything that has a concrete due date. In the second column, list all the amorphous, ambitious projects that have no end-date. Start with the projects that have a concrete deadline that is coming up soon, things like a lesson plan for orientation, or finishing a syllabus. At the end of the day, take 20-30 minutes to analyze your date-less projects; are these projects that need to be done? Are these projects actually many mini-projects, that can be tackled by task, over time?

2) If you have big projects on your list, break them down into manageable components:

I read some great advice in an Inc. magazine article; whenever you have a major goal that you can't seem to reach, work backwards. Break down everything that needs to get done, then group the tasks into categories. When you check off a category, you will feel a special excitement--you can see that you are getting closer to your goal.

3) Minimize distractions:

Don't multi-task. You just get a lot of things half-completed, usually poorly. If you need to compulsively read the news (me) or compulsively check email (many people), try one of the free software programs that de-activates you from the internet for a period of time (see Freedom, http://macfreedom.com/). This article gives basic information on ten other programs that help you focus on one project at a time http://99u.com/articles/6969/10-online-tools-for-better-attention-focus.

4) Schedule your projects, and move meetings around to accommodate project completion (not the other way around):

There is an excellent TED talk that discusses why meetings are a waste of time (see here: http://www.ted.com/talks/jason_fried_why_work_doesn_t_happen_at_work.html). Alas, I also find they are a necessary evil. But I find that when I put meetings first, and task-completion second, I never get anything accomplished, but I have acquired a new to-do list from all the meetings I've attended. When you really need to get things done, it's best to switch priorities. I schedule tasks into my calendar, and all meetings have to be scheduled around the tasks.

5) Schedule your email:

In nine years working in academia, if there is no constant refrain, it's that email is a massive time-suck. I've read a thousand different suggestions for minimizing that time-suck, from only reading email three time a day, to answering all emails immediately, first thing in the morning or at the end of the day. None of these worked for me. However, I learned to stop using email as an excuse. I let people know when I will be answering emails immediately, and when they should expect a wait before they receive a response. What I have found is that people respond quite well when I let them know ahead of time that I am in a busy period and they may have to wait for a response. Students, who are known for becoming angry when professors don't respond to their emails immediately, have been amongst the most understanding when I have let them know they may need to wait for a response. Students become angry when they feel like they are being ignored. If you let them know what is on your plate, and promise them a response within a certain time-frame, 95% of them will be great about the delay. When I know I have to get things accomplished, I set an auto-reply on my email that tells people what I am doing and when they should expect to hear from me (usually within two weeks). I also add a message that lets them know who they should contact in case of emergency.

(RCF)

August 6, 2013 in Advice, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Thoughts on starting at a new school

After a 2 month absence, I am back on the blog, and a huge thank you to Amy for covering for me while I was moving!

One of the things I noticed as I was perusing past posts is the number of ASP positions that have opened up recently. Several schools will be hiring new people in the coming months, and here are my preliminary, abbreviated thoughts on starting in a new position in ASP:

1) Figure out the reporting structure:

You need to know who you will report to, and if that is a different person from the one that writes your evaluation. In past positions, I have reported to the head of legal writing, the assistant dean for academic affairs, the dean of students, and the dean of the law school. You need to know if the person who gives you assignments also writes your evaluation.

2) When you know who you report to, make sure you know what their priorities are:

It's great to hit the ground running, but it's not so helpful if you come with a stellar plan for 1L ASP when your supervisor really wants you to focus on bar prep, 2L remediation, or intro to law/orientation programs. Before you start planning, you need to figure out where you should be spending the bulk of your time and energy.

3) Know the evaluation structure:

At some schools, this is anything but transparent. Know who is evaluating you, and how you will be evaluated. Ask a lot of questions if evaluations are a black box of opacity--opacity is not always a bad thing. I've  worked at a school where evaluations were never talked about with supervisors; if there was a problem, they let me know early so I could fix the issue and move on. At that school, evaluations were not the time to discuss performance--performance was an ongoing topic of discussion, because growth was an ongoing project. I've been at (one) other school were opacity was a terrible thing; evaluations were subjective and designed to humiliate, so everyone knew who was "boss" at the law school. The evaluation structure was whatever the evaluator wanted to use, from any period of time.

4) Know what your admin. assistant/secretary can and cannot do for you:

Your admin will be your lifesaver or your worst enemy; try, try, try not to make your admin your worst enemy. Ask colleagues what your admin can and cannot do for you. Some law schools have one faculty secretary, and that person is overworked, yelled at, and stressed out all the time--do not make their life harder than it already is. Other law schools have several admins, and you are expected to delegate many tasks to them. But you cannot assume the latter; ask your colleagues.

5) Know where to get lunch, and if people lunch together (or, get to know the social culture):

The social culture of a school is critical; if you misread the social culture, it can damn you professionally. The social culture at UMass is wonderful--relaxed, and collegial. Uconn-Storrs (distinct from the law school) had a much more formal social culture, but one that was incredibly welcoming, warm and genuine. Uconn-Storrs has a very unique culture; everyone lunches together, everyday, at noon, in a conference room.  Few law schools do this, but it was fantastic. I learned the informal rules of the office that way; I learned who to ask for what, when; and I learned how I could help people. One of the things I will miss most about UConn is lunching with colleagues everyday.

I am sure I will have much more to add about starting at a new school. But for now, I need to get back to writing a new syllabus and reading for my upcoming Property class. (RCF)

 

July 30, 2013 in Advice, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Update on the Law School Academic Success Project Website

The following e-mail from Louis Schulze (Chair) appeared on the Academic Support Section listserv for AALS to update ASP'ers on the status of LSASP and some assistance that is needed to update the website:

Dear Colleagues,

As you may know, the law school academic success project website is maintained by the AALS Section
on Academic Support.  A few weeks ago, some questions arose on the ASP
listserv regarding how to gain access to that website.  After some
troubleshooting, it now appears that those matters have been resolved, and we
are moving forward with continued improvements to the website. 

As Chair of the Section, I’m happy to report that OJ Salinas, of UNC Law, has agreed to serve as Senior Editor of the website and Chair of the Section’s Website committee.  You will be noticing some changes to the website in the near future, and I write today to ask for your assistance with some of these changes: 

(1)  Any person who recently requested access to the website should now have access.  You should have received an email approving your request.  If you recently requested access and have not
been approved, please contact OJ at osalinas@email.unc.edu

(2)  We need assistance with the “Contacts” section of the website.  Could you please check your information and your school’s information for accuracy and report any changes to OJ?  Also, if you were recently granted access to the website and would like to be added to the
contacts section of our website, please forward to OJ at osalinas@email.unc.edu your school;
title; telephone number; and email.  If you have one available, a photograph would be helpful (head shot is best for the website).  If you have an updated photograph that you would like added to the website, please forward it to OJ, as well.

(3)  We would like to update the portion of the website dealing with conferences.  If you know of an upcoming ASP conference, could you please report it to OJ?  If you recently presented at a
conference and would be willing to share your materials, could you email OJ?  We want to continue to use the website as an ASP resource, and conference materials are valuable resources.

Additional changes are on the horizon for the website, and we look forward to rolling those out in the near future.  In the meantime, I’m sure I speak for our community when I thank Jon McClanahan of UNC Law for chairing the website committee for several years now and doing a wonderful
job.  Thanks also go to OJ Salinas for his recent work and for agreeing to chair the committee in the future.  Finally, our entire community owes a huge debt of gratitude to Ruth Ann McKinney for the hours upon hours of work she invested in creating the LSASP website, which is an incredible
resource. 

Best regards,

Louis

Louis N. Schulze, Jr.

Professor of Law & Director of Academic Support

NEW ENGLAND LAW
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
 

 
 BOSTON

 

July 18, 2013 in Miscellany, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Request for Article Submissions to The Learning Curve

Dear ASP colleagues: 

The Learning Curve is the official publication of the AALS Section on Academic Support, showcasing
brief articles treating theoretical or practical ideas related to student support and teaching excellence.  Recently we shifted to a twice-yearly publication structure, and we look forward to sharing our first summer issue next month.  Its articles explore ways to incorporate "Fun and
Games" into your programs. 

We are considering articles for the January 2014 issue now, and we want to hear from you!  We are
particularly interested in submissions concerning professional development in ASP, and encourage both new and seasoned ASP professionals to submit their work.  Can you share some advice regarding scholarship – generating ideas, outlining, navigating the submission process, etc.?  Are you doing
something innovative in your classroom?  Do you have a fresh take on technology or what it means to be “ASPish”?  Can you tell us something about the history of ASP teaching? 

Please ensure that your articles are applicable to our wide readership.  Principles that apply
broadly, i.e. to all teaching or support program environments, are especially
welcome.  While we always want to be supportive of your work, we discourage articles that focus solely on advertising for an individual school’s program.  

Please send your submission to learningcurveasp@gmail.com by no later than August 30, 2013.  Please attach it to your message as a Word file.  Please do not send hard copy manuscripts, and please do not paste a manuscript into the body of your e-mail.  Articles should be 500 to 2,000 words, with light notes, if appropriate.  Please note that Publisher does not support footnotes that run with text. 
Endnotes or references lists will be used in publication and are strongly preferred in manuscript submissions.

For more information, or to inquire about the appropriateness of a topic, contact Jennifer Carr at Jennifer.Carr@unlv.edu. Please include “Learning Curve” in the subject line of your inquiry.

We look forward to reading your work and learning from you! 

 

Sincerely,

The Learning Curve Editors

Jennifer Carr, Heather Harshman, and Courtney Lee

 

July 16, 2013 in Miscellany, Publishing, Writing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Moving

I forgot how emotionally-draining, financially-challenging, and logistically complicated it is to move from one location to another. After four-and-a-half wonderful years, I am getting ready to leave UConn to join the faculty at UMass on July 1. I am very excited about the new job. However, the last two weeks (and the next two weeks) of my life have been consumed with the details of moving my life from CT to MA. These issues led me to reflect on the issues our students face when they start law school.

Many law students move long distances to start law school. For a student who comes from a family with the financial means to hire movers and take look-see trips for apartments, this is an arduous process. Just coordinating dates and times is challenging; apartment complexes either fill up very early (in college towns) or apartment managers do not know vacancies until the last minute (rural and suburban areas, law school detached from larger universities). Apartments that are beautifully photographed can be in terrible neighborhoods, or have serious issues. Look-see trips are very helpful when sorting out these problems. But for our students who have to look for apartments while living far away, and need to move their life in a U-Haul truck, this process is incredibly stressful and emotionally-draining. These students usually can't leave their jobs until the last moment, so they are moving, and starting law school, within a one-to-two week period. It doesn't leave much time to adjust to a new area, or relax before the whirlwind of 1L year.

This is something to think about as ASP professionals plan orientation and the start of school. We may not being seeing the best of our students in those early weeks. We may be seeing students still stressed out, exhausted, and not-yet focused on academics. (RCF)

 

June 20, 2013 in Miscellany, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, May 12, 2013

Batteries Not Included

It is the end of the semester, and I suspect a lot of ASP'ers are looking forward to a lull in the hectic pace of ASP work.  Some folks will have more of a hiatus than others because of low or no summer enrollments.  A few folks are on 9- or 10-month contracts with the summer off.  And those ASP'ers deeply involved with bar studiers will have a short lull.

Whether you are a one-person ASP operation or have a team and whether you have 50 invited ASP students or all law students as your target population, I imagine that you are ready for a change of pace.  The last part of the semester is always fraught with students overwhelmed by exams, students confronted by personal crises, graduates gearing up for the bar exam, and a myriad of important deadlines.  For those of us who teach ASP or other courses, we are/will be inundated with papers/exams to grade. 

I love the lull because I get to do two critical things: complete lots of projects and recharge my batteries.  In the age of portable electronic devices that get recharged nightly, I sometimes wish that I came with a battery as well.  Since I do not come equipped, here is a list of my favorite recharging activities both in and out of the office:

  • Attend a summer conference with other ASP'ers to get new ideas, renew old friendships, meet new ASP'ers, and remind myself how much I love my work - we are so lucky to have AASE at the end of the month!
  • Find a new book by an ASP'er in the publishers' catalogs and delve into new perspectives on student learning, legal reasoning, or other facets of our work.
  • Chat with faculty and other colleagues at my school to find out what they are working on this summer, to brainstorm ideas as to how we might work together next year, and to reconnect after we have all been so busy all year.
  • Revamp at least one aspect of my program for a fresh perspective: a training manual, workshop packets, my ASP group exercises, a selection process for upper-division students who work in ASP, a Power Point presentation.
  • Read through my collection of thank you notes from students to remind myself of the impact that ASP work has.
  • Spend more time with friends and family now that overtime hours and evening events will lessen.
  • Sleep in on some Saturday mornings to recharge quite literally.
  • Indulge in fluff novels that have nothing to do with the law - no John Grisham for me.
  • Catch up on all the movies that I have missed and summer releases.

What are your favorite ways to recharge?  I wish all ASP'ers good ends to the semester and blessed summer months.  (Amy Jarmon) 

 

May 12, 2013 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Academic Advising and Registration

The mandatory meeting for first-year students (optional for upper-division students) to discuss our registration process for next year's classes was held last week.  Registration will start next week.  For first-year students, the process can create a great deal of stress because it is another "unknown" to them.

The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs explained the ins and outs of the curriculum requirements beyond the first-year required classes.  The Registrar explained the actual procedures for registration. 

And then the rumor mill started to make the process even more stressful.  The sources were sometimes upper-division students' comments but often just from imagination: 

  • Horror tales about registration for rising 2L students (computer freezes, no places in popular courses because rising 3Ls will take all the spots, long wait lists, etc.) while ignoring changes in the system and statistical realities. 
  • Rumors that students will fail if they get Professor X while swearing they will get an A with Professor Y - even though course statistics do not reflect these guarantees. 
  • Rumors playing up the fear factor of different professors' exams or teaching styles or course topics and ignore that different students learn and test better in different ways and have different backgrounds and interests. 
  • Moanings about the audacity of the law school's hiring of unknown visitors/new hires/adjuncts who cannot be easily pigeon-holed.

So what is the 1L student to do to survive registration and choosing the best class schedule?  Here are some tips that I give students when they consult with me:

  • Know the requirements for graduation: credit hours, normal course loads, required doctrinal courses, skills development courses, writing courses, certificate programs, dual degree programs.
  • Think ahead beyond the next semester to the full academic year and the next academic year - how will fall 2L courses impact spring 2L courses and how will 2L courses influence the 3L courses. 
  • Consider summer school credits (including study abroad) if the student plans to attend and know the policies that are involved.
  • Have alternate course choices in mind in case a class is closed out entirely or only waiting list spots are open at the time the student registers.
  • Take a balanced course schedule by considering paper versus exam courses, required versus elective courses, large versus seminar courses, difficult topics for the student versus topics that come more easily, hands-on skills courses versus traditional courses, courses that interest the student versus ones that have less appeal, law versus dual degree courses (if applicable), and other factors.
  • Watch out for prerequisites that are needed for later courses or clinics that the student wants to take.
  • Talk to professors about elective courses that sound interesting but are only briefly covered in the course descriptions to find out more about the courses.
  • Talk to professors in specialty areas in which the student may want to practice to get advice on courses that would be beneficial for background.
  • Consider courses that will give background for the bar exam but which may not be required courses for one's law degree. 
  • Talk to multiple students who have taken a course/professor in the past because variety of input will likely highlight pros and cons rather than one-sided feedback.
  • Look at the exam schedule to see what the grouping of exams will be like for particular combinations of courses (available at our school prior to registration).

With careful thought and planning, registration can be a less stressful experience for students.  Faculty, administrators, and others can provide guidance as students weigh the pros and cons of different course choices.  (Amy Jarmon) 

 

April 3, 2013 in Advice, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

The Downward Slope

For most law schools, the semester is on the downward slope to exams - the midpoint for classes has passed.  Students who have been putting things off are waking up to the fact that time is not on their side any longer. 

Many law students whose Spring Breaks are over used the recent time away from class to catch up: outlines were started or completed, paper research was started or completed, and paper drafts were begun.  Law students with Spring Break this week are planning the same machinations.

Here are some tips for getting the most out of the time left in the semester:

  • Add to course outlines weekly so that new material is pulled together while it is still fresh.
  • Write down all of your questions for each course and get them answered now: by classmates, by professors, or through study aids.
  • List all of the topics and subtopics that must be learned for each exam course to get a realistic view of the amount of material.
  • Estimate the amount of time needed to learn each topic already covered in class to the level needed to walk into the exam.
  • Schedule learning that same older material for no more than two-thirds of the remaining class period; reserve the other weeks for learning the new material that has not yet been covered.  For example, if there are six weeks left, try to learn the first eight or nine weeks of material in four weeks and reserve the remaining two weeks to learn brand new material.  During the exam period, focus on the last one to two weeks of new material and review everything else.
  • Do as many practice questions as possible for each exam course.  However, it is ineffective to do practice questions on a topic before you have intensely studied it.  Wait a few days after intensely studying a topic before you do practice questions - you want to see if you retained the information well enough to get the answers correct.
  • Do not skip classes because professors will begin to give information about the final exams and pull material together.
  • Also do not skip classes because the last few weeks are often heavily tested when the course builds over the semester.
  • Expect every step for researching and writing a paper to take longer than you think it will.  Plan your work accordingly.
  • Leave ample time to edit your paper in stages for specific aspects rather than edit for everything at once.  Stages might be for logic, grammar, punctuation, style, accurate quotations, citations, tables/exhibits, or other appropriate categories.

The last part of the semester will be more productive if there is a plan for using the time.  Do not waste time just thinking about study tasks; start studying in earnest.  (Amy Jarmon)

 

March 20, 2013 in Miscellany, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Toxic People

Several law students have recently bemoaned the pettiness and spitefulness of other law students.  It is not uncommon in the midst of the competition and the quest for superiority that some law students denigrate others' intelligence or abilities or accomplishments.  They think the put-downs show their own competence and lessen the other person's worth.  They want to sabotage their competition with mean remarks.

In truth, the inferior ones are the law students who feel compelled to make such remarks, to taunt other law students, and to tout their own superiority.  They are simply not nice people.  And if it were not for the self-contained environment of the law school, everyone could easily avoid them.

Too often law students react to these toxic people in ways that encourage them rather than short-circuit their venom.  Onlookers will snicker to feel accepted by these toxic students or to cover up their own insecurities.  The fawning snickerers should beware; toxic law students don't have loyalty to anyone except themselves.  One slip and the fawner today can be the target next week.

Other law students stand by silently and say nothing even though they know the behavior is unacceptable.  They don't want to get involved.  They don't want to tell the toxic law student to apologize or to leave the other person alone.  They could counter the snide remark with a positive one to the student who has just been put down.  Or they could even befriend the student who is the target.  

How sad that the people who are some day going to be officers of the court and supposedly uphold justice and protect the vulnerable are so unwilling to act professionally during law school.  The toxic ones will probably turn into the arrogant partners who bully new associates and paralegals.  The fawners will continue to be spineless ingratiators in practice.  The silent onlookers will continue to not take a stand once they are admitted to the bar.

Fortunately, there are some law students who know the difference between right and wrong and will come to the defense of others.  Instead of fuming later, they will intervene at the time.  They will be polite, even diplomatic, but stand up for what is appropriate behavior among professionals. 

Some law students will likely comment that nothing can be done and that it is just the way law school is.  However, each law student's individual actions can impact the atmosphere of a law school.  If each person who does not like the toxic behavior that develops in law schools were to oppose that behavior, law schools would be less stressful places for everyone.  (Amy Jarmon)    

  

March 19, 2013 in Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)