Monday, January 26, 2015

Law School Action Comics #8

Lsac8

(Alex Ruskell)

January 26, 2015 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Group Work? More on Sexism and ASP

ASP conferences and presentations frequently extol the virtues of group work. Books and articles suggest that group work would enhance legal education, make students better prepared for law practice, and make law school less isolating. Business schools rely on group projects. Despite the evidence, law schools hew to the familiar, and few 1L courses include group work, although some upper-division seminar and clinical courses include group exercises. For women, there may be some benefit to this arrangement. 

Women are subject to the "secretary effect," where they are the secretary, the recorder, or the stenographer in group projects. The spit-balling, the creative thinking, and the leadership roles are taken by the men of the group. Women are expected to play supporting roles, while men take the lead, when they work in groups. This arrangement extends into adulthood. 

I never liked group work, which is one of the reasons I enjoyed law school. In group projects, I felt like my contributions were never valued, I did more work than other members of the group, and I was stuck in ill-fitting roles where I could not demonstrate my competance. On the rare occasion I had to work in a group during law school, I sought out all-female groups, where I knew I would feel more comfortable. 

Professionally, I see the same pattern. ASP is dominated by women, who rarely rise to leadership roles outside of our small community. ASP is designed to support students, but is frequently expected to support the (predominately) male tenured and tenure-track faculty. ASP, as a field, keeps the students in school, helps them achieve career success through bar support, yet rarely receives the credit for helping law schools  meet accreditation standards. In ASP, we are still the unsung secretaries, the essential member of the group who is undervalued and overlooked. 

(RCF)

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Group Projects and the Secretary Effect

How team assignments in school reinforce traditional gender roles in kids and adults
 
http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/01/group-projects-and-the-secretary-effect/384104/

January 17, 2015 in Academic Support Spotlight, Current Affairs, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Welcome Back!

Kotter2

(Alex Ruskell)

January 6, 2015 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, January 3, 2015

Sexism in ASP

This semester has been eye-opening for me. I haven't spent a lot of time thinking about sexism in ASP. Although I am a dyed-in-the-wool, true-blue feminist, I've been lucky that I haven't faced much individual sexism (as opposed to institutional or systemic sexism, which are think are endemic to the academy). In the past, it's been one-off incidents, nothing that made me really question whether ASP fosters sexism. ASPs are predominantly run by untenured women, teaching in second-class rolls. While more men have joined our ranks, many of the (admittedly talented, committed) men that have been in ASP for more than 5 years have moved into tenured or high-level administrative positions, while I see equally talented, committed women stuck in the same second-class positions, without promotions or recognition, year after year. 

I don't think this is solely due to institutional sexism. Studies have shown that women receive lower course evaluations than men. A tiny, needs-to-be-replicated study out of North Carolina State demonstrated that students will give higher course evaluations if they believe their instructor is a man--whether to not the instructor actually is a man or a woman. (See study here

This semester I co-taught an ASP course with a fantastic, very talented male (tenured) professor. Mid-semester, we asked students to fill out qualitative evals, asking them to tell us what we should do and how to improve. While the majority of the surveys were helpful and fair, a disconcerting minority used the evaluations to make personal, sexist comments that had nothing to do with the substance of the course. Not one evaluation made personal comments about my male co-teacher. 

I spoke with several experienced female professors after I read the evaluations. Everyone had a similar story; students feel it's okay to attack a female professor's attire, posture, hair style, or tone of voice in evaluations meant to measure teaching. 

These attacks on female professors are damaging careers. Students evaluations are regularly used to renew contracts and earn tenure. The best administrators know to ignore these damaging comments in evaluations. But many evaluations are on a 1-5 scale, with female professors losing valuable points for things that have nothing to do with their ability to teach.  And administrators can't distinguish between someone who needs help in the classroom, and someone who is receiving low scores because "their voice hurts my ears" or "their clothes are too bright for my taste." 

ASP is integral to the success of the legal academy. It is time we started looking at the reasons why we are still second-class citizens. 

(RCF)

 

January 3, 2015 in Current Affairs, Diversity Issues, Miscellany, Program Evaluation | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Time to Relax and Re-energize

The semester is over and you've spent the last week either sleeping or catching up on everything you put off during exams. You've still got a few weeks until next semester starts so it is time to find a balance between rest and relaxation, and reenergizing so you can start the new year off right.

The first goal is to stay healthy:

  • Drink plenty of water: we often eat when what our body      really needs is hydration. Drink a glass of water the next time you feel      sluggish or have the munchies. Odds are this will do the trick.
  • Get moving: in addition to physical benefits, regular exercise      gives you more energy, improves your mood and lowers stress.
  • Sleep:

Next, do something each day:

  • Plan your day: even if you are on vacation, identify      two or three things to accomplish each day. This prevents the stress of scrambling      at the last minute.
  • Use your brain: you don’t have to read legal tomes or      memorize statutes but you should learn something new every day. Increasing      your knowledge keeps you inspired and motivated.
  • Reflect daily: end each day with a few minutes of      reflection of what you’ve accomplished (not what you haven’t done).

Last, focus on what makes you happy:

  • Express gratitude: identifying things you are grateful      for promotes happiness and increases self-worth.
  • Clean your desk/room: doing this might not make you      happy but the end result will. A clean space allows you to focus on your      work instead of the clutter.
  • Indulge yourself: set aside time to indulge yourself      (just a little) so that you don’t resent having to work or study.

Too much of any one thing is never good so use these next few weeks to find a balance. It will be both enjoyable and productive and you’ll have a good foundation for next semester.

(KSK)

 

December 23, 2014 in Advice, Encouragement & Inspiration, Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, December 19, 2014

Waiting for Grades

Law students breathe a sigh of relief once all of their exams are over and the last papers turned in.  It is such a good feeling to have the semester over!  No more studying for the time being!

Alas, the relief is short-lived for some students.  They begin almost immediately to worry about the final grades for their courses.  For some students, the worry is caused by being too close to the GPA needed to meet academic standards.  For other students, the worry is caused by wanting a certain GPA for qualifying for a certain law firm's job application cut-off or retaining scholarship aid or achieving some other standard for a law-school honor. 

Whatever the reason for the worry, it can cause sleepless nights and self-doubt until the grades are finally posted.  It is the lack of control over the grades that makes students anxious.  Not only do they need to do their personal best, but they need to achieve a high enough score to "beat the curve" for the class. 

The recommended percentages for each grade bracket of most law schools' curves mean that the overall class performance determines the grades given.  Students know that if everyone in the class knew the material and performed well on the exam then just 2 or 3 points can be the difference between a higher or lower letter grade.  They realize that some folks will get low grades no matter how large the break between the lowest C and the next grouping.  No wonder students sign up for seminars that often do not have to conform to the recommended curve.

It is important to put grades into perspective while waiting for the outcomes:

  • You cannot change anything about the exam that is already completed or the paper that is already turned in.  Stewing about the misread fact pattern, the forgotten rule, the missed issue, the skimpy case analysis, and more will not change anything.  We are not perfect, so it is inevitable in law exams and assignments that perfection will not be reached.  All of us remember "the ones that got away" in our law school experiences.   
  • A final exam grade reflects one's performance on one set of questions on one day at one time.  Any student who was sick, tired, stressed, or unfocused during the exam can know that the grade reflects those less than optimal circumstances and not just knowledge/application.
  • Over the full spectrum of a law degree, students benefit from the curve as often as they get hurt by the curve.  It evens out over time.  The break in the curve gives you a higher grade on one exam but may catch you with a lower grade on another. 
  • A low grade does not mean you are less intelligent, less worthy, or less talented than the day you walked across the threshold of your law school for the first time your 1L year.  It merely means that you need to implement some new strategies and forge ahead.  Do not allow grades to undermine your self-worth.
  • Grades indicate opportunities for improvement rather than just measures of performance.  There are lots of ways to improve on test-taking whether the exams are true-false, multiple choice, short answer, fact-pattern essay, or some other variation.  ASP professionals can assist students in evaluating their problem areas and work on strategies with them.

After the initial angst of grades that are less than you hoped for, pull yourself together.  You can do this with assistance.  Review your exams or papers with your faculty members to get feedback on what you did well and what you need to improve.  Then make an appointment with your academic success professional to implement a plan for that improvement.  (Amy Jarmon)

  

 

December 19, 2014 in Encouragement & Inspiration, Exams - Studying, Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

What Students Talk About When They Talk About Us

Yesterday, my wife and I were having lunch in a restaurant when someone suddenly shouted, "Alex Ruskell!"  The shout wasn't directed at me or anyone else.  I noticed a group of law students sitting a few tables away, and I assumed they were the source.  

I had no idea what the shout meant.  My wife thought the shout's tone sounded a lot like Adventure Time's James Baxter, the horse who repeatedly says his name while balancing on a beachball to make people happy.  In case you haven't seen it:

James Baxter  

I'd like to think my students think of me as a horse who repeatedly says his name while balancing on a beachball to make people happy, but I started worrying that maybe it was somthing negative.

My wife and I spent the majority of the rest of lunch trying to decide what the shout meant.  Was it good?  (my wife).  Was it bad?  (me).  Was it what ladies say when they envision the perfect man?  (my wife).  Were they saying I owed them money?  (me).  Were they just being weird and wanted to see if I would hear them, because people get totally weird in law school?  (my wife).  Were they planning who they would eat first if they were stranded on a deserted island?  (me).  Was it what students say when they need help?  (my wife).  Was it a reference to the fact I didn't introduce myself at my last student presentation until I'd already finished it?  (me).  Clearly, I could've walked over and asked them, but that probably would have been pretty creepy.

The whole experience got me thinking about student evaluations.  I do student evaluations for my tutors, and although they are 99 percent fantastic, there is always some crank with an axe to grind.  This year, one of my female tutors was called a couple names in an evaluation, apparently from a student who was mad she wouldn't give him handouts without his attendance in tutoring (which I tell my tutors to do).  She wasn't upset exactly, but she was worried it had lowered my opinion of her tutoring. 

In my experience, people spend a lot more time worrying about a negative (or seemingly negative) evaluation than they do feeling good about the good evaluations.  But how much value does a negative evaluation really have, and how much weight should be put into them?  Is a "negative" evaluation always negative?  For example, a student called one of my colleagues "feisty" once -- was that an actual bad evaluation, some kind of weird praise, or was it just sexist (we spent some time together trying to figure out that one)?  Are the negative evaluations somehow more "true," while the positive evaluations are merely students being nice?  Are negative evaluations ever about the teaching?  For women, are "negative" evaluations more likely (as recent studies suggest they are)?  For schools that advertise themselves as "student-centered," is this really the best way to decide what the students actually need?  Are evaluations basically a popularity contest?

When someone asks me who my favorite teacher of all time was, I always say one of my junior high teachers -- mainly because he taught us how to do "The Bird" for the Valentine's Dance and referred to me as his "number one jellyhead."  I can't really say whether I learned anything, but I do remember how often he threw me out of class, his sartorial choices, and his claims that certain STDs could be cured with hefty wallops from a rubber hammer.  That kind of stuff is what made him my favorite.  It also led my wife to believe I had made the guy up until she met someone else that had gone to my junior high.

I am sure I didn't like or praise many worthy teachers because they didn't know who Morris Day and the Time were or demonstrated how things would go with the rubber hammer if I wasn't careful.  

I am also sure that my tutor did a great job and that whatever mental real estate she had ceded over to that one poor evaluation was wasted.

But, unfortunately, that seems to be how the mind works, whether justified or not.

(Alex Ruskell)

 

 

 

December 17, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, December 5, 2014

One Marshmallow or Two?

I recently attended a lecture by Dr. Walter Mischel, who is known for administering “The Marshmallow Test” to young children as a researcher at Stanford. As many of you are aware, the test consisted of children sitting in a room with a single marshmallow (or another sweet treat) while being asked to delay eating it. If they delayed their gratification, the child would get a greater reward at a later time (typically two marshmallows). The experiment produced interesting and, at times, comical responses from the children being observed. You can check out some Marshmallow Test videos on YouTube to watch the eye rolling, seat squirming, and general agitation exhibited by the children.

While the underlying experiments were amusing to watch, the conclusions drawn from the initial experiments and the long term studies were quite insightful.  Essentially, by understanding our impulses and how we can retrain ourselves in order to have greater willpower, we can make better choices and be more productive. Many of us believe that human nature rules whether the child would take the marshmallow instead of waiting (or whether the student would study for another 2 hours before watching an episode of their favorite show or checking their Facebook page). While some are more inclined to eat the marshmallow right away, many are able to resist for a limited amount of time.

As Dr. Mischel pointed out, we can all learn how to control our impulses (kids with marshmallows or adults with other enticements). For example, if you know that when you go to holiday parties, you rush the dessert table and do not leave that table until you have sampled two of each type of dessert, you can put a plan in place in order to limit your dessert intake. If you have no plan in place or if you arrive to the party hungry, you are more likely to fall into the dessert vortex. If plan ahead, to first spend some time at the crudité and also allow yourself a bite from three different sweets over the course of the event, you are more likely to be successful in limiting your impulses. Alternatively, if you instead plan to abstain completely from eating dessert at the party, you will likely fail. Thus, deliberate and premeditated change in small increments helps create a new practice that is easier to successfully adopt and sustain.

How does this apply to law students? Law students often succumb to and/or are ambushed by procrastination. It is difficult to delay gratification no matter what age. I learned from the marshmallow studies and from Dr. Michel’s presentation that we can all learn how to control our impulses if we understand what drives our impulses and if we are committed to making one small change at a time. In my example above, an individual knows that they struggle with overindulging in dessert. The willpower is harder to maintain without a clear and doable strategy in place. However, recognizing the temptation, adopting a realistic alternative, and planning ahead create a method for success. If law students try to more fully understand their impulsive triggers, they are better positioned to generate a plan to resist or avoid them.

Thus, law students can follow this strategy to use their time more effectively and more efficiently. Here are a few ideas:

  • They can begin by writing out typical time stealers and creating targeted goals to reduce them. (Examples: When I study in groups, I am easily drawn off topic. When I turn on the television, I end up watching it for longer than I expected. If I turn my phone on while I am studying, my social media becomes a huge distraction.)
  • They can purchase or create calendars in order to plan and track their time. Hard copy calendars visualize their priorities much better than a computer version.
  • They can turn off their electronic devices while they study for a continuous block of time. (Example: I will study Torts for 3 hours in the library and leave my computer and phone in my locker.)
  • They can disable their Wi-Fi while in class or while reviewing notes on their computer.
  • They can establish a reward system that motivates this continued behavior. (Example: If I complete my stated study goal, I will get a night off or an extra hour of sleep, or more time for a special activity.)

Once an effective time management plan is established and the inherent benefits are apparent, students are more apt to fully adopt these new strategies by continuing to buck their impulses. After all, two marshmallows later are better than one marshmallow now.

(Lisa Bove Young)

 

December 5, 2014 in Bar Exam Preparation, Exams - Studying, Miscellany, Science, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Address the Stress with Mindfulness

Lawyers have a higher rate of depression, anxiety, substance-abuse, and suicide than the rest of the population. The practice of law can be stressful but aren’t most jobs?  Why are lawyers having so much trouble dealing with stress? Stress is a mental (and sometimes physical) reaction to a perceived threat or change. In law school, stress manifests early in the 1L year: our past perfection drives our desire to do well and it joins forces with the realization that everyone else is striving for the same level of success. It then crashes into the curved grade system which means that no matter how hard you work, your grade ultimately depends on how well others do. Regardless of the grade, the uncertainty and lack of control lingers throughout your law school career. Then you enter the practice of law and these feelings collide with the emotional intensity of dealing with clients’ problems day after day and working with other lawyers who are often adversarial. It’s a recipe for anxiety, depression, and substance-abuse.

The reality is, life itself is a constant flow of change so we will always have stress. However, stress is not so much the event itself but our perception and reaction to that event. There will always be deadlines and performance expectations. We can’t change that but we can change the way we perceive stress.

Oftentimes, we react to negative situations without thinking. Instead of intentionally focusing on the present moment, we immediately judge it as good/bad, right/wrong, fair/unfair. This habit is not necessarily a positive one because it is reacting without thinking.  It leads to stress, anxiety, depression. Instead, we need to develop a new habit: mindfulness. Mindfulness is a powerful tool for addressing emotional challenges because it helps develop meta-cognition, focuses attention, and strengthens the ability to make deliberate choices. Mindfulness addresses the stress. It allows us to be in control of our own mind instead of our mind controlling us. In practicing mindfulness we learn to become aware of our thoughts, emotions, feelings, and behavior so we can interrupt stress cycles before they take over.

Janice Marturano, author of Finding the Space to Lead, and Executive Director of the Institute for Mindful Leadership recommends something called the Purposeful Pause. The Purposeful Pause is more than just stopping. It is about redirecting and focusing attention so you can make conscious choices. Try incorporating one of these Purposeful Pauses into your day:

  • Choose to start your day rather than letting the day start you. Start the day by just breathing and before getting out of bed, take a few seconds to notice the sensations of your breathing.
  • Use transitions wisely. Pick a day to drive to (or from) work/school without the radio or phone. When you arrive, allow yourself a few moments  to sit in the car, noticing the breath.
  • Just walk between meetings/classes. No emails, texts, or social media. Think about each step you take and the possibility of greeting colleagues you pass rather  than bumping into them while you text!

Mindfulness is an opportunity to create new, healthy habits. Let’s make the intentional choice to be mindful and let’s change those statistics.

KSK

November 5, 2014 in Encouragement & Inspiration, Miscellany, Stress & Anxiety | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The Many Hats of ASP

Due to the nature of our work and the lightning fast pace of the academic year, we are so busy that we often forget the many things that we do and various roles that we play.  When asked about our jobs, it is easy to answer with a title, “I am the Director of the Bar Studies Program,” or “I am an Academic Support Professor.”  Or, to answer with an important aspect of our work, “I help students prepare for the bar exam” or “I provide tools for academic success to 1Ls.”  But, these statements do not nearly cover the many hats that we wear at our law schools. 

Instead, listing the qualities that are fundamental to our work is more apropos.  We educate, we advocate, we counsel, and we empathize.  Interestingly, these attributes are strikingly similar to those of a good lawyer.  We, like lawyers, balance our time listening, thinking and analyzing, instructing, and communicating with and for our clients or students.  In a series of blog posts, I will explore the various responsibilities, tasks, and missions we have as ASP Professionals with the hope that others will better understand the work that we do and the essential needs that we fill.  

  Mortar board

Educator  

Some of us see our main goal in ASP to be that of an educator.  Simply put, we love teaching.  And, as educators, we are constantly honing our craft.  We research new teaching methodologies and strategies.  We implement new techniques in the classroom and monitor student progress and their learning needs.  We reflect on our own work and the impact it has on our students.  We seek out curricular changes that will benefit the student body as a whole.  We provide formative assessments so students can become self-regulated learners and remedy their weak areas.  And, above all, we tirelessly work to help students achieve academic and bar success.

We educate our students in many ways with the work that we do.  In ASP, we teach 1Ls the basics of reading and briefing cases, outlining and exam preparation, and school/life balance.  We help 2Ls fine tune their legal writing, strengthen their legal analysis skills, and help them establish their professional persona.  And, we usher 3Ls into the world of law practice by teaching them the fundamentals necessary to pass the bar examination.  

Webster defines an educator as: “one skilled in teaching” and “a student of the theory and practice of education.”  Academic Support Professionals are truly skilled in teaching and are the epitome of life-long learners.  It is in our roles as educators that we engage students and help them utilize their strengths and improve their weaknesses.   We constantly learn from these interactions with students and from our application of learning theory in our work. In ASP, we wear our "educator hat" most often, but we are also always perpetually being schooled by our students.

 (LBY)

October 30, 2014 in Miscellany, Professionalism | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Prof Looking to Assemble Panel for SEALS conference

Professor Russell L. Weaver at the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law is hoping to put together a panel of Academic Success folks to attend the SEALS conference and address the topic of disabilities and support in law school.  If you are interested, please contact him at russ.weaver@louisville.edu.

 

October 29, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Law School Action Comics #7

Lsac7

(Alex Ruskell)

October 19, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 26, 2014

Working with Each Individual Student's Choices

I really enjoy my students.  It is a privilege to help them reach their academic potential.  With new strategies, encouragement, and regular support many of the students who were struggling can make a major turn-around.  When they stop by or email me to tell me about the high grade on a midterm, a positive critique on a paper, their first B grades in law school, and other triumphs, I share their joy. 

Each student is unique in the combination of learning styles, personal and academic challenges, course difficulties, and more.  Although there are strategies that work for most students, those strategies may not be a match with others. 

I discuss with my students that the materials that I give them will pull together strategies that have worked for many students - strategies that are based on memory and learning theory as well as other research.  I explain the reasons for the strategies and their relevance to grades, future bar passage, and ultimately to practice.  I also encourage them that if the strategies do not work for them as individuals that we need to explore what strategies will work for them.  We can work as a team to modify approaches or brainstorm new approaches that will work.

Most students are eager to become more successful learners.  They readily become part of the team to improve their academics.  They want to learn more deeply, to improve their skills, and to improve their later performance on the bar exam and in practice.  The meetings become a dialogue seeking the strategies that work best for them as individuals.  We discuss, tweak, and brainstorm together.

One challenge to a team effort is that some students are resistant to any change in their study habits even when their grades indicate that their past strategies have not been successful.  Change is frightening when the consequence of not making grades is dismissal from law school.  Change is stressful when they are struggling with the first bad grades in a lifetime and silently question whether  other law students are smarter.  Change is very uncomfortable when old habits feel so safe in comparison to new techniques. 

With these students, I discuss strategies that will move their studies closer to success within their limited comfort with change.  As they see positive results with small steps, they are often willing to try additional small changes.  Unfortunately, because they limit the number and range of strategies, they often also limit their academic improvement compared to other students who are open to change.

Another challenge to a team effort is that some students are not invested in their academics to a level that allows them to live up to their true academic potential.  For a few, the reality is that responsibilities and circumstances outside of law school limit their time for studying.  Examples of these aspects would be care for elderly parents, serious medical illness in the family, personal illness, or financial problems.  For other students, the extra hours that law school requires to get high grades does not seem worth the effort.  They are content with studying enough hours to keep their grades above the academic standards but not more than that amount. 

With these students, I work together to get more results from the time invested.  Where time is being consumed by study methods that get little oomph, it can be boosted by more effective strategies.  Often undergraduate study methods can be modified for law study to get more traction. These students can still improve some - though again the reality is that their improvement is likely to be less than students who have more hours to invest in effective study.

Throughout the process, I try to encourage students, to read between the lines as to what is going on with them, and to be supportive.  Each student has to make a decision as to what strategies are feasible to implement within the personal framework of that student.  The individual's parameters will determine the student's overall success in academics.  I can be a guide and a partner in the process.  The student has to make the final choices as to time and effort.  I have to respect their choices even when I recognize that they will not meet their full academic potential.  (Amy Jarmon)        

 

    

 

September 26, 2014 in Learning Styles, Miscellany, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Quick Web and App Tips from Students

The following web sites and applications have been suggested by law students to help other law students:

  • Flashcard Machine: website and app that allow the making of flashcards, random sort, and temporary removal from the deck (flashcardmachine.com)
  • Quizlet: website and apps for flashcards, fill-in-the-blank, and essay questions; can share with others (quizlet.com)
  • SelfControl: Mac app for blocking websites, e-mail, and internet for set time period (selfcontrolapp.com)
  • Chrome Nanny: a Google Chrome extension to block time-wasting websites
  • Facebook Nanny: another Google Chrome extension to block your Facebook access unless you have a notifications
  • Blotter: app for Mac users for desktop time management schedule

If you have apps and websites that are your favorites, please send me an e-mail with the heading "Apps and Websites" at amy.jarmon@ttu.edu so that I may share them with our readers.  (Amy Jarmon)

 

September 25, 2014 in Exams - Studying, Miscellany, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Reminder: October 1st Deadline for Nominations for the AALS Academic Support Section Award

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR THE AALS SECTION ON ACADEMIC SUPPORT AWARD

The Awards Committee for the AALS Section on Academic Support is soliciting nominations for our section award.  The Association of American Law Schools Section on Academic Support’s Award will be presented at the January 2015 AALS meeting and will be awarded to an outstanding member of the ASP community.  Please review the eligibility and criteria information below and send nominations directly to Awards Committee Chair, Joyce Savio Herleth via email herlethj@slu.edu. The deadline to submit nominations is October 1, 2014 at 5pm PDT.  For a nomination to be considered, it must include (at a minimum) a one to two paragraph explanation of why the nominee is deserving of the award.  Only AALS ASP Section members may make nominations, but all those within the ASP community may be nominated.  Membership in the section is free and can be processed within minutes at AALS Section Membership.  For detailed instructions on how to become a member, please view this page:  https://memberaccess.aals.org/eWeb/DynamicPage.aspx?Site=AALS&WebKey=87e3b982-657e-4a7c-be71-33605903d797

Eligibility and Criteria for Selection.  The eligible nominees for the Award will be Section members and any other individuals who have made significant or long-term contributions to the development of the field of law student academic support.  All legal educators, regardless of the nature or longevity of their appointment or position, who have at some point in their careers worked part-time or full-time in academic support are eligible for the Award.  The Award will be granted to recognize those who have made such contributions through any combination of the following activities:  assumption of leadership roles in the ASP community; support to and mentoring of colleagues; service to institutions, including but not limited to schools, the ASP Section, and to other organizations; expansion of legal opportunities to traditionally underserved segments of society; teaching and presenting; and scholarship, both traditional and creative. 

Law schools, institutions, or organizations cannot receive an award.  Prior year or current year Section officers are excluded from being selected as an award winner.

Joyce Savio Herleth
Director of Academic Support

Saint Louis University School of Law
100 North Tucker Blvd.

St. Louis, MO  63101-1930 
(314) 977-7247
herlethj@slu.edu

September 24, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Are you an ASP professional who wants to become a member of the ASP listserv?

ASP professionals working at law schools can sign up for the academic support listserv.  Members of the listserv can post resources for others and post questions to solicit colleagues' advice.  Thank you to Louis Schulze for sending the instructions to share with those who are not currently on the listserv:

To sign up for the ASP listserv, follow these steps:  

Address email to listproc@chicagokent.kentlaw.edu

No subject

In the body of the message enter:  subscribe list_name your_first_name your_last_name title school_name

where:

list_name is the name of the list you wish to subscribe to,

your_first_name is your first name,

your_last_name is your last name

title and school_name are optional

If this does not result in a subscription email in one week, people should contact Lawrence Adameic at unixmgr@kentlaw.iit.edu.

 

September 18, 2014 in Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Ahh - a Three-Day Weekend

We just finished our second week of classes.  The first-year students are looking a bit shell-shocked.  The upper-division students are commenting on how things are already too fast-paced.  Everyone is looking forward to the long weekend.

Here are some tips for getting the most out of the weekend:

  • Get a good start on next week's class preparation.  Try to complete your Tuesday and Wednesday assignments.  You will feel less stressed as the week begins again.  Then review the material before class (or the night before) so you have seen it twice.
  • Outline for each of your courses.  Using this weekend to get on top of all course outlines, will put you in an advantageous position.  You can then add to your outlines each week and not end up having to find huge blocks of time in future weeks to catch up on outlines.
  • Set up your study space as you will use it for the rest of the semester.  Have all of your school-related items in the same place to save time by not having to hunt for things. 
  • If you have not already made note of all deadlines and due dates for courses (paper draft due, midterm exam, court observation assignment, other projects), mark those dates on a monthly calendar so you will not forget anything.
  • If you are already sleep-derived, catch up on your sleep and establish a routine sleep schedule beginning Sunday night that will give you 7 - 8 hours of sleep during regular bed and wake up times.
  • Plan a few hours for fun: exercise, a BBQ with new friends, a movie, your favorite TV shows.
  • If you have boxes to unpack, errands to run, or other personal items to take care of, try to complete them before classes next week.  You will have less stress if you are more settled into your living space and routine.

Enjoy this slight respite.  Be ready to hit the ground running on Tuesday.  (Amy Jarmon)

August 30, 2014 in Miscellany, Study Tips - General | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 29, 2014

Are you new to Academic Support or Bar Prep work? Have you moved schools?

At the beginning of each academic semester, we like to introduce ASP or bar professionals who are new to their law schools or who have changed locations?  We want to post an academic spotlight about you so that you are introduced to the community of readers if you are new and so readers know your news if you have moved to a different law school.

If you would like for us to post an academic spotlight about you (or a colleague at your school who is too shy to send us something), please send the following information to Amy Jarmon at amy.jarmon@ttu.edu.  I will be doing posts throughout September and early October.

Here is what I need from you for a spotlight post:

  1. A small jpeg photo.
  2. Your full name, title, and law school information.
  3. 100 - 200 words telling us about yourself: when you started your job, what you were doing before your position, your JD school, your legal practice experience/specialties, your interests professionally and personally.
  4. A link to your faculty/staff profile on your law school web pages if one exists.

We look forward to welcoming you to our terrific community of colleagues and updating folks on your careers.  (Amy Jarmon)

August 29, 2014 in Academic Support Spotlight, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Jr. Faculty Scholarship Exchange--Oct. 17, 2014

August 18, 2014

Dear colleagues:

As the summer wanes and we move into the fall semester, the University of Massachusetts – Dartmouth School of Law wishes to invite you to our Second Annual Junior Faculty Scholarship Exchange. This is an opportunity for junior faculty in the New England region to gather together to discuss works in progress, finished papers, research interests, and to network with peers from other institutions. Our hope is to provide a local forum for legal scholars to develop their ideas and scholarship with input and constructive criticism from fellow law teachers. This event is especially aimed at faculty with seven, or fewer, years of law teaching experience.

We are hosting this conference at the UMass Club, located in the heart of Boston’s financial district, on the 33rd floor of 225 Franklin Street. The venue is close to South Station, and the red and orange lines of the MBTA, several parking garages and local hotels. A hot buffet lunch, with morning and afternoon snack services will be provided. For directions, see: http://www.clubcorp.com/Clubs/University-of-Massachusetts-Club/About-the-Club/Directions-Hours.

Please consider joining us for this event by marking your calendar for Friday, October 17th, 2014, from 10 to 4. Seating will be limited. To register for the Junior Faculty Scholarship Exchange, send me an email at sclough@umassd.edu. Kindly include a short abstract of the work you wish to share with our group. We will confirm your registration for the event. Once we achieve capacity, we will need to decline further registrations . As this event is being underwritten by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth School of Law there is no registration fee. Attendees will need to assume responsibility for their personal travel or lodging expenses.

Feel free to forward this invitation to a junior faculty member that you believe may be interested.  If this is information that you would prefer not to receive, please let us know and we will take you off of our list. If you have any immediate questions or concerns please call us at (509)985-1121, and ask to speak with Emma or me. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Spencer E. Clough

Associate Dean/Director of the Law Library

The University of Massachusetts – Dartmouth School of Law


 

August 23, 2014 in Current Affairs, Meetings, Miscellany, News, Writing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Law School Action Comics #5

Lsac5

(Alex Ruskell)

August 17, 2014 in Advice, Miscellany | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)